A photo of Dr. Julie Livingston with a bookshelf in the background.

November 14, 2018 – Julie Livingston: “Self-Devouring Growth: A Planetary Parable”

This talk, like the book from which it is drawn, calls into question the imperative of economic growth, tracing the unintended consequences of escalating consumption. Using a series of linked cases of successful economic growth (water, roads, and cattle in Botswana), it shows how insatiable growth, predicated on consumption, will inevitably overwhelm, a process Livingston terms self-devouring growth.

Julie Livingston is Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis and History at New York University. She is the author of the forthcoming Self-devouring growth: a planetary parable told from Southern Africa (Duke University Press), Improvising Medicine: An African Oncology Ward in an Emerging Cancer Epidemic (Duke University Press), Debility and the Moral Imagination in Botswana (Indiana University Press), and numerous articles and essays and edited volumes and special journal issues. Livingston is the recipient of the Victor Turner Prize for Ethnographic Writing, the Royal Anthropological Institute’s Wellcome Medal, and the American Association for the History of Medicine’s William Welch Medal. In 2013 she was named a MacArthur fellow.

Date/Time

November 14, 2018 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

 

A photo of Dr. Peter Limbrick

November 28, 2018 – Peter Limbrick: “For a New Nahda: Moumen Smihi, World Cinema, and Arab Modernism”

Dr. Limbrick’s forthcoming book on Moumen Smihi connects the Moroccan filmmaker’s modernism to the Nahda or “Arab Renaissance” of the 19th-20th century, which re-energized Arab culture in dialogue with other languages and discourses. Offering new ways to think about world cinema and modernism in the region, Limbrick argues that Smihi’s radically beautiful films take up the Nahda’s challenge for a new age.

Peter Limbrick is Associate Professor of Film and Digital Media at UC-Santa Cruz. He is the author of Making Settler Cinemas: Film and Colonial Encounters in the United States, Australia, and New Zealand (Palgrave 2010) and has published on transnational cinema and postcolonial culture in Cinema Journal, Camera Obscura, Third Text, Framework, Visual Anthropology and other journals. He has received fellowships from National Endowment for the Humanities and the UC President’s Research program and is currently finishing a book about Moroccan filmmaker Moumen Smihi, a key figure in the “new Arab cinema” that emerged in the late 1960s across North Africa and the Middle East. In 2013, he curated a major retrospective of Smihi’s work that has screened at the Pacific Film Archive in Berkeley, Block Cinema, in Chicago, and Tate Modern, in London.

Date/Time

November 28, 2018 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

 

A black and white photo of men transporting goods in a shipping yard. A cargo ship is in the background.

December 5, 2018 – Muriam H. Davis: “Colonial Genealogies of Racial Neoliberalism: Governing for the Market in Algeria, 1958-1965”

Prof. Davis’s current work studies how French attempts to introduce a market economy during the Algerian War of Independence transformed the prevailing understandings of racial difference organized around Islam. It highlights the continuities with the post-colonial period, when Algerian socialism introduced new economic practices that were a locus for expressing revolutionary values and national identity.

Muriam Haleh Davis is an Assistant Professor of History at the University of California Santa Cruz. Her research interests focus on questions of political economy, racial classification, and post-colonial studies in Algeria. She recently co-edited an edited volume entitled North Africa and the Making of Europe: Governance, Institutions and Culture (Bloomsbury Press, 2018). Her recent articles have appeared in the Journal of European Integration History and Journal of Contemporary History.

Date/Time

December 5, 2018 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

A map of Latin America, with pins, in it, is shown at a close angle.

April 11, 2018 – Amanda Smith: “Cartographic Delusion: When Maps Lie & People Believe Them”

Amanda M. Smith approaches literary expression as a point of entry into spatialities effaced from other official records. She proposes a reading practice of rigorous intertextuality to recover geographic textures smoothed by homogenizing processes of spatial integration. In this talk, she addresses the stakes of such a spatial reading by exploring the legacy of misreading in contemporary Amazonia.

Smith is Assistant Professor of Latin American Literature in the Department of Literature at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She specializes in 20th and 21st-century Latin American literatures and cultures, working across the fields of Indigenous studies and the spatial humanities, with emphasis on the Andean and Amazonian regions. Her current project, tentatively titled Novel Maps, examines how literature and cartography have both overlapped and clashed in transforming Amazonia into a landscape of extraction.

Date/Time

April 11, 2018 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

A woman smiling, against a tin wall.

April 18, 2018 – Mayanthi Fernando: “SuperNatureCulture: Human/Nonhuman Entanglements Beyond the Secular”

Mayanthi Fernando works on Islam, secularism, and the politics of difference in the North Atlantic. Her current project tracks the secular genealogies of the recent posthumanist turn. Reading this scholarship alongside other traditions of nonhuman ontologies, including Islamic sciences of the unseen, she asks whether we might rethink “natureculture” as “supernatureculture.”

Mayanthi Fernando is an associate professor of Anthropology at UCSC, and the director of the Center For Emerging Worlds. Her current project attends to the nexus of sex and religion in the articulation of modern secularity, analyzing how the secular state’s project of regulating and transforming religious life is interwoven with its project of sexual normalization, i.e. the production of secular, sexually “normal” citizens. She is interested in how proper religion and proper sexuality are mutually constituted (often in opposition to each other) by secular rule.

Date/Time

April 18, 2018 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

A man is shown from the waist up, pointing to a sign with Greek lettering.

April 25, 2018 – Yiannis Papadakis: “Here/There: Immigrants, Comparison & Critique”

Yiannis Papadakis published work on Cyprus has focused on ethnic conflict, borders, nationalism, memory, museums, historiography, history education and cinema. His recent work explores issues of migration and social democracy in Denmark, based on fieldwork with Greek and Greek Cypriot immigrants in Copenhagen.

Papadakis holds an appointment in the Department of Social and Political Sciences at the University of Cyprus, and is a visiting scholar at UCSC.

Date/Time

April 25, 2018 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

An illustration of female reproductive organs

May 2, 2018 – Kyla Schuller: “The Biopolitics of Feeling: Race, Sex, & Science in the Nineteenth Century”

Kyla Schuller investigates the intersections between race, gender, sexuality, and the sciences in U.S. culture, and is particularly interested in ideas about how the body interacts with its environment from the periods both before and after classical genetics, i.e. the 19th century and the present. Overall, she examines how science and culture function as systems of knowledge that share methods and sources in common, even as they rhetorically claim distinct spheres.

Schuller is an Assistant Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies at Rutgers University, New Brunswick and an External Faculty Fellow at the Stanford Humanities Center (2017-2018). She has previously held fellowships from ACLS and the UC Humanities Research Institute and a visiting scholar position at UC Berkeley.

Date/Time

May 2, 2018 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

A woman stands with her arms crossed against a hedgerow

May 16, 2018 – Jennifer Doyle: “Harassment & the Unravelling of the Queer Commons”

This talk will attempt to speak to the difficulty of this moment for queer/feminist theorists—for teachers, students and staff who live and work with harassment, with forms of misogyny that are so embedded in professional life as, in some ways, to feel synonymous with it. This work is a return to a scene many of us have never left, but which critical formations tend to represent as having passed: super-sexual political writing calling for openness against an intolerable future.

Jennifer Doyle is a Professor of English at UC Riverside.

Date/Time

May 16, 2018 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

Two seated people are shown at a table, with a brick background.

May 23, 2018 – Saein Park: “Dancing Waste of History: Lumpen in Heine, Marx, & Benjamin”

Saein Park’s current project argues that the discourses of Lumpen record the changing demarcations of disposable lives during the emergence of European industrial modernity. She researches 19th- and early-20th-century German-language literature, political philosophy, and critical theory, focusing on translation and reception studies, theories of waste, and plant studies.

Saein Park is a Visiting Assistant Professor at UC Santa Cruz.

Date/Time

May 23, 2018 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

A woman, resting her hand on her chin, is sown from the neck up.

May 30, 2018 – Robin Coste Lewis: “Voyage of the Sable Venus: Bodies, Art, Race, & Poetry”

Robin Coste Lewis is the author of Voyage of the Sable Venus (2015), which won the National Book Award for Poetry. Her work has appeared in various journals and anthologies, including The Massachusetts ReviewCallalooThe Harvard Gay & Lesbian ReviewTransition, and VIDA.

Date/Time

May 30, 2018 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz