January 17, 2016: Margaret Frantz Memorial

A memorial for Marge Frantz (1922-2015) a Hist Con graduate (1984) and longtime colleague at UC Santa Cruz in Women’s Studies and American Studies will be held on Sunday, January 17th from 2-5pm.

Refreshments & reception following the program.

Ample and free parking is available. Enter UCSC at the WEST entrance. Three stop signs and turn right and proceed to the end of the road. Recital Hall is in front of you.

Contributions in Marge’s memory are welcomed by Aptheker/Frantz Women’s Studies Endowment at UCSC, American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California, and Alzheimer’s Association, Northern California and Northern Nevada Chapter.

“An inspiring and beloved teacher, skilled activist and generous friend, Marge Frantz died in Santa Cruz on October 16 at the age of 93. Passionately committed to social justice, she identified strongly with the three great social movements of her time: socialism, civil rights and feminism. They shaped her as an organizer, intellectual, and teacher who refused hierarchies while embracing and delighting in differences. She crossed boundaries wherever she encountered them—between teachers and students, academics and activists, young and old, rich and poor, gay and straight, black and white. Her emphasis on commonalities was crucial to the success of the progressive communities she created and sustained throughout her life…” Read more..

Read Frantz’ obituary in the Santa Cruz Sentinel here.

2016 Cultural Studies Association Annual Meeting CFP

CSA2016

Submissions Due: February 1, 2016

 

2016 Cultural Studies Association (CSA) Conference
Fourteenth Annual Meeting of the Cultural Studies Association (US)
Villanova University, Villanova, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
2-5 June, 2016

“The theme, Policing Crises Now, is prompted by and departs from the rich and diverse innovations and provocations of ‘Policing the Crisis’ (1978), a groundbreaking work generated by a collective of scholars, including and facilitated by Stuart Hall. Those innovations and provocations include the collective nature of the research, the conjunctural/structural mode of analysis, the attention given to race, gender and sexuality in political-economic dynamics, as well as the analysis of intertwined statistical representations, media representations, legal proceedings and, of course, policing by police, as a response to a “crisis of hegemony.

Taking up Policing Crises Now, in the current conjuncture, requires fresh theorization both of policing, in light, especially, of the potential elasticity of the metaphor, and of crisis in light of its diverse deployments in critical analysis, dominant political-economic practice, and popular culture. By pluralizing crises, we aim to open the scope of inquiry at this conference to include the full range of social, cultural, natural, political, and economic phenomena to which the term crisis has been attached. We also aim, under this rubric, to develop conversations engaged during our last conference about the structure of university work and employment, the ways knowledge production is constrained and enabled by austerity politics, neoliberal entrepreneurialism, the prominence of debt and risk, and the university as a site of policing of thought and political activism. It is our hope that this conference both builds from and enables collective knowledge production and research practices.” Read more…

Of Interest Events for the Week of May 18, 2015

 

Monday, May 18 / POLITICS SPEAKER SERIES / Andrew March / “The Problem of Sovereignty in Modern Islamic Political Thought” / 3:30 – 5:00 / Charles E. Merrill Lounge

Monday, May 18 / CENTER FOR JEWISH STUDIES / Maurice Samuels / “French Universalism and the Jews: Anti-Antisemitism and the Right to Difference” / 4:00-6:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

Monday, May 18 / FILM + DIGITAL MEDIA ARTIST SPEAKERS SERIES / Kevin Jerome Everson / Screening of “Erie” and Artist Q&A / 7:00pm / Communications 150 (Studio C)

Tuesday, May 19 / HISTORY DEPARTMENT / David Brundage / “Remembering 1916 in America: The Easter Rising’s Many Faces, 1919-1962″ / 2:00-3:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 520

Tuesday, May 19 / CRISIS IN THE CULTURES OF CAPITALISM RESEARCH CLUSTER / Neferti Tadiar / “Next to Nothing” / 4:00-6:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

Tuesday, May 19 / INSTITUTE FOR THE ARTS AND SCIENCES / Last LASER (Leonardo Art/Science Evening Rendezvous) of the Year / 6:30-8:00pm / Digital Arts Research Center (DARC) Dark Lab, Room 108

Wednesday, May 20 / SCIENCE & JUSTICE / Kim TallBear / “Crossing Cultures of Expertise and Tradition: Opportunities and Challenges in Cultivating Indigenous Scientists” / 4:00-6:00pm / Engineering 2, Room 599

Wednesday, May 20 / DEPARTMENT OF LANGUAGES AND APPLIED LINGUISTICS / Kimberly Adilia Helmer / “Learning Spanish is a Waste of Time: Understanding Heritage Learner Resistance in a Southwest Charter High School” / 5:00-7:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

Thursday, May 21 / CRITICAL RACE & ETHNIC STUDIES / Lisa Lowe, Jack Halberstam & Chandan Reddy / “Perverse Modernities: Conversations in Critical Race and Ethnic Studies” / 3:00-7:00pm / Humanities 2, Room 259

Thursday, May 21 / LIVING WRITER SERIES / Eleni Sikelianos & Josef Sikelianos / 6:00-7:45pm / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

Friday, May 22 / CENTER FOR GAMES & PLAYABLE MEDIA / “Natives in Game Dev Gathering” / 10:00am-5:00pm / UCSC Extension Silicon Valley Building

Friday, May 22 / FRIDAY FORUM FOR GRADUATE RESEARCH / Muiris Macgiollabhui / “Carrying The Green Bough: An Atlantic History of the United Irishmen, 1791-1830″ / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

Friday, May 22 / UCSC BIOS RESEARCH CLUSTER / Mark Andrejevic / “Drone Theory: Automated Data Collection and Processing and the Always-On War” / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

 

* To advertise your unit or department’s event in the “Of Interest” section of this weekly bulletin, please e-mail complete event information in text format (no PDFs) to cult@ucsc.edu no later than noon on Friday of the prior week.

* Additional information and regular updates on “Of Interest” events can be found on the IHR website and on the Cultural Studies website.
 


 
OF-INTEREST EVENT DESCRIPTIONS:
 

Monday, May 18 / POLITICS SPEAKER SERIES / Andrew March / “The Problem of Sovereignty in Modern Islamic Political Thought” / 3:30 – 5:00 / Charles E. Merrill Lounge

Andrew March will be speaking about his on-going book project, which is an analytic history of modern Islamic thought on political sovereignty and the foundations of government. Its main focus is on a tradition of thinking on sovereignty that has developed since the late 19th and early 20th century, associated originally with Islamic Modernism and more recently with the thought of Tunisian Islamist Rashid al-Ghannushi and many other thinkers within the broad orbit of the Islamist movement. A central idea advanced in this discourse is that all mankind (following certain verses of the Qur’an) have inherited the vicegerency (caliphate) of God. This doctrine, along with very popular views on the meaning of God’s law which stress the centrality of public welfare and God’s purposes (maqasid) in creating the law, pave the way for a more popular, but still constrained, conception of sovereignty. God remains the ultimate legislator, and the author of man’s rights, but mankind at large (primarily, although not always exclusively, Muslims) is authorized collectively to establish government, constitute itself as a political entity and define in its broad and narrow particulars what it means to apply God’s law. His study is aimed at mapping out these various genealogies of sovereignty, exploring the various paradoxes and ambiguities in trying to reconcile ideals of divine and popular sovereignty in Islamic political theology, and elaborating their most recent doctrinal manifestations and developments since 2011.

Andrew F. March is Associate Professor of Political Science, Yale University. His research interests are in the areas of Islamic law and political thought, contemporary political theory, the history of political thought and religion and politics.
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Monday, May 18 / CENTER FOR JEWISH STUDIES / Maurice Samuels / “French Universalism and the Jews: Anti-Antisemitism and the Right to Difference” / 4:00-6:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

In conflicts over the veil or the return of antisemitism in France today, minority difference is often seen as a threat not only to public order but to the Republic itself. Long on the defensive, universalism has now staged a comeback in current discourse that seeks to guard against excessive communitarianism or the fantasized demon of American-style multi-culturalism. However, the universal and the particular were not always as opposed as today seems to be the case. In this paper, I look back at the history of the way the universal was theorized in relation to France’s paradigmatic minority—the Jews—from the Revolution through the nineteenth century. My goal is to show that prior to the hardening of positions during the Dreyfus Affair, French universalism was far more welcoming to minority difference than is ordinarily assumed today. Recovering this history, I suggest, might offer ways around France’s current ethnic and religious dilemmas.

Maurice Samuels is Betty Jane Anlyan Professor of French at Yale, where he also directs the Yale Program for the Study of Antisemitism. He’s is the author of “The Spectacular Past: Popular History and the Novel in Nineteenth-Century France,” published by Cornell University Press in 2004, and of “Inventing the Israelite: Jewish Fiction in Nineteenth-Century France,” published by Stanford University Press in 2010, which won the Scaglione Prize given by the MLA for the best book in French Studies. He also co-edited “Nineteenth-Century Jewish Literature: A Reader,” published by Stanford in 2013.
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Monday, May 18 / FILM + DIGITAL MEDIA ARTIST SPEAKERS SERIES / Kevin Jerome Everson / Screening of “Erie” and Artist Q&A / 7:00pm / Communications 150 (Studio C)

Erie consists of entrancing single-take, 16mm black-and-white sequences filmed in and around the communities surrounding Lake Erie. Scenes explore African American migration from the South to the North, contemporary conditions, everyday tasks and labors, theater, and famous art objects. Erie has been described as “a revelation… full of images of pure poetry” on Turner Classic Movies’ blog and has been seen and honored at film festival awards around the world.

Ohio native Kevin Jerome Everson, who has made six feature films and over ninety shorts, is one of the most prolific and remarkable independent filmmakers working today. His work has been exhibited internationally at festivals, museums, cinemas and galleries, including the 2008 and 2012 Whitney Biennials. A solo exhibition of his short films, More Than That: The films of Kevin Jerome Everson was held at the Whitney in 2011. He has been the subject of career retrospectives at the Centre Pompidou, Paris and Visions du Reel, Nyon. He is the recepient of the 2012 Alpert Award in the Arts for Film/Video.

With a sense of place and historical research, Kevin Jerome Everson’s films combine scripted and documentary moments with rich elements of formalism. The subject matter is the gestures or tasks caused by certain conditions in the lives of working class African Americans and other people of African descent. The conditions are usually physical, social-economic circumstances or weather. Instead of standard realism he favors a strategy that abstracts everyday actions and statements into theatrical gestures, in which archival footage is re-edited or re-staged, real people perform fictional scenarios based on their own lives and historical observations intermesh with contemporary narratives. The films suggest the relentlessness of everyday life—along with its beauty—but also present oblique metaphors for art-making.
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Tuesday, May 19 / HISTORY DEPARTMENT / David Brundage / “Remembering 1916 in America: The Easter Rising’s Many Faces, 1919-1962″ / 2:00-3:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 520

David Brundage is Professor of history and the History Graduate Program Director.

The talk will draw on an essay-in-progress for a collection entitled Remembering 1916: The Easter Rising, the Somme and the Politics of Memory, ed. Richard S. Grayson and Fearghal McGarry. Brundage focuses his attention on a period that has been relatively neglected in the history of the Irish in America, the 1920s through the early 1960s. How (and by whom) was the 1916 Rising remembered in this period? Providing some answers to this question can tell us a great deal about the striking diversity of memory practices, while also shedding light on important aspects of Irish American (and American) life in these decades.

A once powerful Irish American nationalist movement shrank dramatically in this period. Nonetheless, the Rising continued to be remembered (differently) by Catholic churchmen, Irish American labor leaders, African American nationalists, and Hollywood. The telling of the Easter Rising story, Brundage argues, had a kind of modular character. That is, narratives of 1916, frequently marked by stirring examples of idealism, courage, and sacrifice, could be lifted out of their specifically Irish context and used to legitimize or inspire other sorts of movements and agendas—or simply to entertain. Remembering 1916 in America involved a diverse array of people, practices, and motives, and its analysis has the potential to shed light on important mid-twentieth century topics ranging from African American nationalism to representations of Ireland and the Irish in American popular culture.
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Tuesday, May 19 / CRISIS IN THE CULTURES OF CAPITALISM RESEARCH CLUSTER / Neferti Tadiar / “Next to Nothing” / 4:00-6:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

This talk is a meditation on remaindered life, the unsubsumable, indivisible yet every-diminishing leftover of life-making practice for those who live in proximity to a social state of utter valuelessness. Drawing on diverse yet connected social contexts of redundant or superfluous populations, including undocumented immigrants, refugees, guest workers, and criminalized black and brown men and women, in a global, post-Fordist economy where all life bears the potential to serve as a direct means and source for the extraction of capitalist value, the talk explores the significance of lives lived on the perpetual verge of being nothing not only to offer an alternative account of the current globopolitical order. Tracing the constitutive elements of slavery and colonialism in this global present, the talk also reflects on the petty social currencies of small-time living as a speculative exercise on what is to be done next.
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Tuesday, May 19 / INSTITUTE FOR THE ARTS AND SCIENCES / Last LASER (Leonardo Art/Science Evening Rendezvous) of the Year / 6:30-8:00pm / Digital Arts Research Center (DARC) Dark Lab, Room 108

Join us for refreshments at 6:30 p.m. followed at 7 p.m. with presentations by:

Daniel Press is the Olga T. Griswold Professor of Environmental Studies and Executive Director of the Center for Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems at UC Santa Cruz. His research interests include environmental politics and policy, land preservation, water quality regulation and management, industrial ecology, and policy analysis. He is the author of Democratic Dilemmas in the Age of Ecology: Trees and Toxics in the American West (Duke University Press, 1994), Saving Open Space: The Politics of Local Preservation in California (UC Press, 2002), and American Environmental Policy: The Failures of Compliance, Abatement and Mitigation (Edward Elgar, 2015).

Roger Linington is Associate Professor of Biochemistry at UC Santa Cruz. His research centers on marine natural products used in biomedical science. Linington’s research has two major focuses: drug discovery for neglected infectious diseases including malaria, TB and dengue fever, and the use of natural products as probes for biological systems.

Anita Chang is an independent filmmaker, educator and writer. She is also currently a PhD Candidate in Film and Digital Media, UC Santa Cruz. Chang’s films are engaged in discourses on (post)colonialism, ethnography, diaspora and cross-cultural representation. Chang has taught film in numerous community and academic settings in San Francisco, Nepal and Taiwan. Honors include grant awards from Creative Capital, Fulbright Foundation, San Francisco Arts Commission, National Geographic and KQED Peter J. Owens Filmmaker program. Her essays have appeared in positions: asia critique, Concentric: Literary and Cultural Studies and Taiwan Journal of Indigenous Studies.

Kim Abeles is an activist and artist whose installations and community projects cross disciplines and media to explore biography, geography and environment. The work merges hand-crafted materials with digital representations. Abeles received the 2013 Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship, and is a recipient of fellowships from J. Paul Getty Trust Fund for the Visual Arts, California Community Foundation and Pollock-Krasner Foundation. She is a 2014/15 Lucas Visual Arts Fellow at the Montalvo Arts Center. She has exhibited in 22 countries, frequently creating artworks site specific to the location, including large-scale installations for exhibitions in Vietnam, Thailand, Czech Republic, England, China, and South Korea.
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Wednesday, May 20 / SCIENCE & JUSTICE / Kim TallBear / “Crossing Cultures of Expertise and Tradition: Opportunities and Challenges in Cultivating Indigenous Scientists” / 4:00-6:00pm / Engineering 2, Room 599

Kim TallBear (University of Texas, Austin) will join us to discuss how genomics forms along with notions of race and indigeneity (the topic of her 2013 monograph, Native American DNA) and the novel roles that Native geneticists are playing in intervening in these processes to create a more just and democratic approach to genomics.
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Wednesday, May 20 / DEPARTMENT OF LANGUAGES AND APPLIED LINGUISTICS / Kimberly Adilia Helmer / “Learning Spanish is a Waste of Time: Understanding Heritage Learner Resistance in a Southwest Charter High School” / 5:00-7:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

Through the lens of “resistance,” the current critical ethnography examines some causes of “strike-like” behavior observed in a Spanish heritage language class in a US southwest charter high school. Fundamental to student resistance was the lack of meaningful activity and authentic materials that connected curriculum to students’ linguistic strengths, target-culture knowledge, and the communities from which they came.

The native Spanish-speaking teacher taught the course as if the Mexican-origin students were foreign language learners without certain native-like language proficiencies and insider cultural knowledge gained from actual experience.

In turn, the instructor did not fully access his own linguistic and cultural repertoire, but instead relied on published foreign language materials that failed to engage students and constructed them as linguistic and cultural outsiders. A pueblo-based pedagogical framework is proposed to make curriculum more culturally relevant, authentic, and engaging.
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Thursday, May 21 / CRITICAL RACE & ETHNIC STUDIES / Lisa Lowe, Jack Halberstam & Chandan Reddy / “Perverse Modernities: Conversations in Critical Race and Ethnic Studies” / 3:00-7:00pm / Humanities 2, Room 259

Perverse Modernities transgresses modern divisions of knowledge that have historically separated the consideration of sexuality, and its concern with desire, gender, bodies, and performance, on the one hand, from the consideration of race, colonialism, and political economy, on the other, in order to explore how the mutual implication of race, colonialism, and sexuality has been rendered perverse and unintelligible within the logics of modernity.

Books in the series have elaborated such perversities in the challenge to modern assumptions about historical narrative and the nation-state, the epistemology of the human sciences, the continuities of the citizen-subject and civil society, the distinction between health and morbidity, and the rational organization of that society into separate spheres. Perverse modernities, in this sense, have included queer of color and queer anticolonial subcultures, racialized sexualized laborers migrating from the global south to the metropolis, nonwestern desires and bodies and their incommensurability with the gendered, national or communal meanings attributed to them, and analyses of the refusals of normative domestic “healthy” life narratives by subjects who inhabit and perform sexual risk, different embodiments, and alternative conceptions of life and death. The project also highlights intellectual “perversities” from disciplinary infidelities and epistemological promiscuity, to theoretical irreverence and heterotopic imaginings.
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Thursday, May 21 / LIVING WRITER SERIES / Eleni Sikelianos & Josef Sikelianos / 6:00-7:45pm / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

Eleni Sikelianos believes in redistributing wealth (top to bottom) and in the overturning of Citizens United. She is the author of seven books of poetry, most recently The Loving Detail of the Living & the Dead (Coffee House, 2013), and two hybrid memoirs (The Book of Jon, City Lights, and You Animal Machine, Coffee House). Sikelianos has been the happy recipient of various awards for her poetry, nonfiction, and translations, including two National Endowment for the Arts Awards, a NYFA, NYSCA, and the National Poetry Series. Her work has been translated into over a dozen languages, and is widely anthologized. She has taught poetry in public schools, homeless shelters, and prisons, and collaborated with musicians, filmmakers, and visual artists. She is on guest faculty for the Naropa Summer Writing Program, and for L’Ecole de Littérature in France and Morocco; she teaches at the University of Denver, where she runs the Writers in the Schools program. She can be found online at: http://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poet/eleni-sik%C3%A9lian%C3%B2s

Josef Sikelianos is a songwriter and musician living in Berkeley CA. He heads the indie folk band Baby Teeth, who are releasing their first full length album this spring. After exploring many disciplines with some thoroughness, Sikelianos graduated cum laude from San Francisco State University with a degree in fine art. Sikelianos put himself through school doing tree work and is now also the owner of a professional tree service company, The Urban Arborist, working in the San Francisco Bay area. Sikelianos notes that “the greatest luxury is the exploration of aesthetics without premeditation or agenda, and the appreciation of beauty is in every endeavor I undertake.” In his spare time Sikelianos reads his sister’s books. He can be found online at: https://www.linkedin.com/pub/josef-sikelianos/2b/427/545
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Friday, May 22 / CENTER FOR GAMES & PLAYABLE MEDIA / “Natives in Game Dev Gathering” / 10:00am-5:00pm / UCSC Extension Silicon Valley Building

Speakers:

Ishmael Angaluuk Hope (Never Alone)
Allen Turner (Stubbs the Zombie, Ehdrigohr: The Roleplaying Game, Hail to the Chimp, Disney Guilty Party, Marvel XP)
John Romero (Wolfenstein 3D, DOOM, Quake)
Jason Edward Lewis (Initiative for Indigenous Futures, Aboriginal Territories in Cyberspace, Skins Video Game Workshops)
Elizabeth LaPensée (Survivance, The Gift of Food, Animism, Singuistics: Anishinaabemowin)
Darrick Baxter (Rez Bomb, Ojibway)
Manuel Marcano (Max Payne 3, BioShock, The Darkness, Treachery in Beatdown City)
Renee Nejo (Ever, Jane, Gravity Ghost, Blood Quantum)

For more details, including the schedule, please see:

UC Santa Cruz to host Natives in Game Dev Gathering


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Friday, May 22 / FRIDAY FORUM FOR GRADUATE RESEARCH / Muiris Macgiollabhui / “Carrying The Green Bough: An Atlantic History of the United Irishmen, 1791-1830″ / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:00 to 1:30PM and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. Light refreshments will be available.

For more info, or to inquire about joining the roster of presenters for the 2015-16 academic year, contact: fridayforum.ucsc@gmail.com
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Friday, May 22 / UCSC BIOS RESEARCH CLUSTER / Mark Andrejevic / “Drone Theory: Automated Data Collection and Processing and the Always-On War” / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

This presentation is not about drones per se – or even war per se; but rather about the deployment of ubiquitous, always-on, networked sensors for the purposes of automated data collection, processing, and response. It is also about the ways in which the logic of drone warfare: prediction and pre-emption, come to characterize a wide realm of social practices: marketing, job screening, health care, romance, and more. The presentation considers the ways in which some contemporary strands of critical theory replicate and rehearse the logics of data-driven droning: the advent of drone theory.

Mark Andrejevic is an Associate Professor of Media Studies at Pomona College. He researches the relationship between popular culture, interactive media, and surveillance. His books include, Reality TV: The Work of Being Watched (2004), iSpy: Surveillance and Power in the Interactive Era (2007), and Infoglut: How Too Much Information is Changing The Way We Think and Know (2013). He examines the social and cultural implications of data mining, predictive analytics, and other forms of surveillance that have become integral to how subjects interact with digital media and popular culture.
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Of Interest Events for the Week of May 11, 2015

Monday, May 11 / SIKH & PUNJABI STUDIES / Dr. Jasjit Singh / “Diasporic Religious Identity in Emerging Adulthood: The Case of British Sikhs” / 12:00-2:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

Monday, May 11 / DIRECTIONS IN DIGITAL HUMANITIES / Fabiola Hanna / “Digital Humanities Working Group / Work-in-Progress Conversation Aesthetics: Imagining Histories of Modern Lebanon, Fabiola Hanna” / 12:15-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

Monday, May 11 / FILM + DIGITAL MEDIA / Public Screening of “One Summer” / 7:00pm / Communications 150, Studio C

Wednesday, May 13 / ANTHROPOLOGY COLLOQUIA / Dr. Alexander S. Dent / 3:15-5:00pm / Social Sciences 1, Room 261

Thursday, May 14 / LIVING WRITER SERIES / Dawn Lundy Martin / 6:00-7:45pm / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

Thursday-Sunday, May 14-17 / LANGUAGES & APPLIED LINGUISTICS / “15th Annual Miriam Ellis International Playhouse” / 8:00-10:00pm / Stevenson Event Center

Friday, May 15 / FRIDAY FORUM FOR GRADUATE RESEARCH / Keegan Cook Finberg / “Reading Poetry of the 1960s: The Fluxus Event Score as Multimedia Encounter” / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

Friday – Sunday, May 15-17 / FILM + DIGITAL MEDIA / Symposium: Poetics and Politics of Documentary Research / Digital Arts Research Center, Room 108

* To advertise your unit or department’s event in the “Of Interest” section of this weekly bulletin, please e-mail complete event information in text format (no PDFs) to cult@ucsc.edu no later than noon on Friday of the prior week.

* Additional information and regular updates on “Of Interest” events can be found on the IHR website and on the Cultural Studies website.


OF-INTEREST EVENT DESCRIPTIONS:


Monday, May 11 / SIKH & PUNJABI STUDIES / Dr. Jasjit Singh / “Diasporic Religious Identity in Emerging Adulthood: The Case of British Sikhs” / 12:00-2:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

This talk examines processes of religious transmission among members of minority diasporic religious communities, with a focus on British Sikhs. Using ethnographic methods including the first ever large scale online survey of British Sikhs, this paper explores the shift which has occurred for many young South Asians in Diaspora who now identify more closely with a religious as opposed to an ethnic identity. Focusing on a number of different arenas of religious transmission including families, religious institutions and the internet, this paper examines how processes of religious socialisation and familial nurture impact on identity, in particular among young people entering the phase of ‘Emerging Adulthood’ (Arnett 2004).

Dr Jasjit Singh is a research fellow at the University of Leeds based in the School of Philosophy, Religion and the History of Science. His research examines the religious lives of South Asians with a particular focus on understanding processes of religious and cultural transmission among Sikhs in diaspora and the different arenas in which this transmission occurs. To date he has examined the relationship between traditional arenas of religious learning (including the family environment and religious institutions) and newer arenas of transmission including camps, University faith societies and the Internet. He has recently undertaken a project examining the cultural value of South Asian arts and has a growing interest in the role of religious media.
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Monday, May 11 / DIRECTIONS IN DIGITAL HUMANITIES / Fabiola Hanna / “Digital Humanities Working Group / Work-in-Progress Conversation Aesthetics: Imagining Histories of Modern Lebanon, Fabiola Hanna” / 12:15-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

Hanna will present her recent work, We are History: A People’s History of Lebanon, a digital interface that collects varied oral histories of a people and presents them in a disruptive but dialogical manner. Using contemporary oral histories about the 1981 siege of Zahle, Lebanon, the software is given the goal of generating a narrative from the transcripts of said oral histories.

Fabiola Hanna is a new media artist, software designer and activist currently using her skills to address historical amnesia in Lebanon. She is a PhD candidate at the University of California, Santa Cruz, where she also gained her MFA in Digital Arts and New Media. Her research lies in software studies, new media art activism, and archives and memory. Her work has been exhibited at the Museum of Art and History in Santa Cruz, the New Children’s Museum in San Diego, the SubZero Festival in San Jose, the Digital Arts Research Center in Santa Cruz and the MakerFaire in San Mateo.
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Monday, May 11 / FILM + DIGITAL MEDIA / Public Screening of “One Summer” / 7:00pm / Communications 150, Studio C

The screening will be followed by Q & A with Director Yang Yishu and her daughter who played the daughter in the film.

“One Summer” is Director Yang Yishu’s first fiction feature. In tracing a woman’s efforts to find her husband and to understand why the police took him away without explanation, the film portrays the sentiment of perpetual anxiety, uncertainty and vulnerability that prevails contemporary China.

The film was selected for the 19th Busan International Film Festival (Korea, October 2014 ) and the 21th Vesoul International Film Festival (France, February 2015), and was awarded the Jury’s Prize.

“One Summer” follows Director Yang’s two documentaries, “Who is Haoran?” (2006), and “On the Road” (2010). “Who is Haoran?” was selected for the 59th Locarno International Film Festival, and the 31th Hong Kong International Film Festival. It has been collected by Songzhuang Art Center (a major base of Chinese independent cinema) and released by Lixianting Film fund.

“On the Road” was selected for the 7th China Documentary Film festival, the 7th China Independent Film Festival, and 2011 Seoul Independent Documentary Film & Video Festival.

Director Yang Yishu represents an important voice in contemporary independent Chinese cinema. In addition to making films, she also teaches as Associate Professor and serves as Associate Director of Film and Video Production Center in the Department of Drama, Film & TV, in the School of Liberal Arts at Nanjing University, China.
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Wednesday, May 13 / ANTHROPOLOGY COLLOQUIA / Dr. Alexander S. Dent / 3:15-5:00pm / Social Sciences 1, Room 261

Alexander Dent’s work uses notions of performativity to analyze mediation, language, policy, piracy, Intellectual Property (IP), and music. This essay uses confidence as a metric for contemporary capitalism, which relies upon aggressively propertizing, individuating, and consumption-oriented epistemologies. His argument is that market based logics often involve: a) unitary and materialistic theories of economic actors, goods, and services on the one hand; and b) the notion that these actors, goods, and services are not only highly symbolic, but also deeply multivalent on the other.

His first book, River of Tears: Country Music, Memory, and Modernity (Duke, 2009) explored the dialogic relationship between traditional and commercial forms of Brazilian `country` as a way of getting at late capitalist rurality. More current work investigates the ways in which IP policing seeks to control the unruly materializations at work in digital reproduction, as well as the ways in which the United States Trade Representative’s practices delimit the “publics” in “public interest.” Dent received his PhD from the University of Chicago (2003). He lives in Washington DC, where he is a practicing musician.
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Thursday, May 14 / LIVING WRITER SERIES / Dawn Lundy Martin / 6:00-7:45pm / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

Dawn Lundy Martin is co-founder of the Third Wave Foundation in New York, a national grant making organization led by young women and transgender youth, which focuses on social justice activism. She is also a member of the Black Took Collective, a group of experimental black poets embracing critical theory about gender, race, and sexuality. She has been the recipient of two poetry grants from the Massachusetts Cultural Council and was awarded the 2008 Academy of American Arts and Sciences May Sarton Prize for Poetry. She has taught at Montclair State University, The New School, and the Institute for Writing and Thinking at Bard College. She is currently an assistant professor in the Writing Program at the University of Pittsburgh. She can be found online at: http://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poet/dawn-lundy-martin
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Thursday-Sunday, May 14-17 / LANGUAGES & APPLIED LINGUISTICS / “15th Annual Miriam Ellis International Playhouse” / 8:00-10:00pm / Stevenson Event Center

This year’s works include: (in French) THE GAP, by Ionesco, and a scene from THE WOULD-BE GENTLEMAN by Molière, directed by Miriam Ellis; (in Italian) BROTHER ATM and SERENDIPITY, by Benni, directed by Giulia Centineo; (in Japanese) SWEET POISON, traditional, directed by Sakae Fujita; (in Russian) THE PATIENT, by Dovlatov, directed by Natalya Samokhina; (in Spanish) MISERY, by Güiraldes, directed by Marta Navarro. The pieces range in time from medieval and classical periods to modern-day theater, with emphasis on their comic elements.

Over the years, the IP presentations have represented an important annual event for UCSC and have attracted a loyal following. In addition to those on campus, many community members, as well as faculty and students from high schools and Cabrillo College, attend regularly. The English titles make the material easily accessible to audiences, who are afforded a rare multicultural experience by the diversity of the programs.

For further information, please contact lmhunter@ucsc.edu or ellisan@ucsc.edu.
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Friday, May 15 / FRIDAY FORUM FOR GRADUATE RESEARCH / Keegan Cook Finberg / “Reading Poetry of the 1960s: The Fluxus Event Score as Multimedia Encounter” / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:00 to 1:30PM and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. Light refreshments will be available.

For more info, or to inquire about joining the roster of presenters for the 2015-16 academic year, contact: fridayforum.ucsc@gmail.com
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Friday – Sunday, May 15-17 / FILM + DIGITAL MEDIA / Symposium: Poetics and Politics of Documentary Research / Digital Arts Research Center, Room 108

This 3-day symposium will reflect a variety of approaches to documentary from a range of fields including film, video, new media, art practice, media and visual culture studies, visual anthropology, and ethnography.

Keynote speaker: Kevin Jerome Everson (University of Virginia) who represents disparate yet interconnected approaches to documentary practice as research.

Innovative panels will bring scholar-practitioners into conversation about making as thinking.

Specific program, times, and locations to be announced.

Free and open to the public.
Parking $3 ($4 if attendants are present)
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May 8, 2015: “In Loving Memory of Christopher Chitty”

We mourn the loss of a friend and vibrant member of our academic community. However, his work is not lost and will continue to act on this world. Friday Forum for Graduate Research would like to invite everyone to join us for a reading and celebration of Chris’s academic writing in place of the presentation that he would have given on this day. This is an invitation to get to know Chris through his work or get to know him better. Everyone should feel welcome and encouraged to attend. There will be light refreshments and space for discussion after the readings.

The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:00 to 1:30PM and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. Light refreshments will be available.

For more info, or to inquire about joining the roster of presenters for the 2015-16 academic year, contact: fridayforum.ucsc@gmail.com

Thursday, May 8, 2015
Humanities 1, Room 202
12:00-1:30

Of Interest Events for Week of May 4, 2015

 

Monday, May 4 / CENTER FOR LABOR STUDIES / Sanchita Saxena / “Made in Bangladesh, Cambodia, and Sri Lanka: The Labor Behind the Global Garments and Textiles Industries” / 12:00-1:30pm / College 8, Room 201

Monday, May 4 / ANTHROPOLOGY COLLOQUIA / Dr. Tsim D. Schneider / “Indigenous Hinterlands in Colonial San Francisco Bay Area, California” / 3:15-5:00pm / Social Sciences, Room 261

Wednesday, May 6 / SCIENCE & JUSTICE / Ruha Benjamin & Charis Thompson / “Good Science/People’s Science: An Exploration of Science and Justice” / 1:00-4:00pm / University Center, Alumni Room

Wednesday, May 6 / VISUAL & MEDIA CULTURES COLLOQUIA / Pamela M. Lee / “Pattern Recognition, c. 1947” / 4:00-6:00pm / Porter College, Room D245

Wednesday, May 6 / DIRECTIONS IN DIGITAL HUMANITIES / Patrick Murray-John / “Latent Data: How, Where, And Why (Digital) Humanists Discover Data Hidden In Plain Sight” / 5:00-7:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

Thursday, May 7 / LIVING WRITER SERIES / Jared Harvey, Gabriela Ramirez-Chavez, Whitney De Vos, Nicholas James Whittington, Eric Sneathen / 6:00-7:45pm / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

Thursday, May 7 / CENTER FOR LABOR STUDIES / “Working for Dignity: The Santa Cruz County Low-Wage Worker Study, Photo Exhibit, and Community Dialog” / 7:00-9:00pm / Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History

 

* To advertise your unit or department’s event in the “Of Interest” section of this weekly bulletin, please e-mail complete event information in text format (no PDFs) to cult@ucsc.edu no later than noon on Friday of the prior week.

* Additional information and regular updates on “Of Interest” events can be found on the IHR website.

 


OF-INTEREST EVENT DESCRIPTIONS:

Monday, May 4 / CENTER FOR LABOR STUDIES / Sanchita Saxena / “Made in Bangladesh, Cambodia, and Sri Lanka: The Labor Behind the Global Garments and Textiles Industries” / 12:00-1:30pm / College 8, Room 201

Join Sanchita Saxena as she discusses her new book, Made in Bangladesh, Cambodia, and Sri Lanka: The Labor Behind the Global Garments and Textiles Industries, which earned rave reviews from leading experts. It is essential reading for students and researchers in policy studies, labor studies, South and Southeast Asian studies, international trade, and political science, as well as those engaged in program design and evaluation of projects focused on labor rights. This study is critical for non-governmental organizations with a thematic focus on the garments and textiles industry, labor rights, human rights, and international trade policy, as well as for private sector organizations focused on improving labor conditions around the world.

Prior to joining the Institute for South Asia Studies (ISAS) at UC Berkeley, Sanchita Banerjee Saxena was the assistant director of Economic Programs at the Asia Foundation, where she coauthored The Phase-Out of the Multi-Fiber Arrangement: Policy Options and Opportunities for Asia, served as a consultant to the Asia Foundation on various economic projects, and was a Public Policy Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington D.C. Saxena holds a PhD in political science from UCLA.

Co-Sponsored by the Anthropology and Economics Departments along with the Center for Labor Studies and the Interdisciplinary Development Working Group
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Monday, May 4 / ANTHROPOLOGY COLLOQUIA / Dr. Tsim D. Schneider / “Indigenous Hinterlands in Colonial San Francisco Bay Area, California” / 3:15-5:00pm / Social Sciences, Room 261

From 1776 to the 1830s, Native people throughout California entered or resisted Spanish missions. For the San Francisco Bay area, resistance often involved running away, approved furloughs administered by some padres, and other thoughtful departures that reactivated threatened places and practices. Following the mission period, Native people continued to meaningfully construct places while also contributing to new economic opportunities emerging across a shifting colonial landscape. This talk presents ongoing archaeological, historical, and collections-based research directed at identifying and investigating such places and practices, including sites of refuge and the opportunities that emerged along coastal Marin County during the 1840s and afterward.
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Wednesday, May 6 / SCIENCE & JUSTICE / Ruha Benjamin & Charis Thompson / “Good Science/People’s Science: An Exploration of Science and Justice” / 1:00-4:00pm / University Center, Alumni Room

As part of the Science and Justice Research Center’s efforts to develop analytics for understanding and enacting ‘science and justice,’ we will be hosting a half-day long symposium that features the work of Charis Thompson (Chancellor’s Professor and Chair of Gender & Women’s Studies, UC Berkeley) and Ruha Benjamin (Assistant Professor in the Center for African American Studies, Princeton University). In their respective works, Good Science: The Ethical Choreography of Stem Cell Science; People’s Science: Bodies and Rights on the Stem Cell Frontier,Thompson and Benjamin provide us with a good starting point for our collective efforts to conceptualize and enact ‘science and justice.’ Join us in the discussion with a response from Julie Harris-Wai (Assistant Professor, UC San Francisco and Associate Director of CT2G).

Please register for the event on the S&J website.
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Wednesday, May 6 / VISUAL & MEDIA CULTURES COLLOQUIA / Pamela M. Lee / “Pattern Recognition, c. 1947” / 4:00-6:00pm / Porter College, Room D245

Pamela M. Lee is professor of Art History at Stanford University. Lee received her B.A from Yale University and her Ph.D in the Department of Fine Arts from Harvard University. She also studied at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program. Her area is the art, theory and criticism of late modernism and contemporary art. Among other journals, her work has appeared in October, Artforum, Assemblage, Res: Anthropology and Aesthetics, Les Cahiers du Musee national d’arte moderne, Grey Room, Parkett and Texte zur Kunst. Lee has published four books in addition to journal articles, reviews and catalogue essays. Three books have appeared with the MIT Press: Object to be Destroyed: The Work of Gordon Matta-Clark (Cambridge: The MIT Press, 2000); Chronophobia: On Time in the Art of the 1960s (Cambridge: The MIT Press, 2004) and Forgetting the Art World (Cambridge: The MIT Press, 2012) Another book New Games: Postmodernism after Contemporary Art was published by Routledge in 2012. Lee is currently working on a book called Think Tank Aesthetics: Mid-Century Modernism, The Cold War and the Rise of Visual Culture.
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Wednesday, May 6 / DIRECTIONS IN DIGITAL HUMANITIES / Patrick Murray-John / “Latent Data: How, Where, And Why (Digital) Humanists Discover Data Hidden In Plain Sight” / 5:00-7:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

In this talk, Murray-John will argue that data and the humanities have long held a close and fruitful interrelationship. Data in humanities research is not new; it is the capacity of new technology to do more with data that creates a sense of difference, possibility, and even anxiety. This talk will begin by looking at centuries-old treatment of data in the humanities, and explore how humanists are rediscovering the data in their corporations.
Dr. Patrick Murray-John is a Research Assistant Professor and Omeka Developer Manager at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University. He has a B.S. in Mathematics from Iowa State University, and an M.A. in English Literature and Ph.D. in Anglo-Saxon Literature from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Besides helping to develop Omeka, he uses it and other tools to experiment with making data part of public humanities projects. A recent project of his, the US Museums Explorer, an Omeka site built on data released by the Institute for Museum and Library Services, was recently cited as an example of using open data in the Center For the Future of Museums’ “Trends Watch 2015″.
This event is targeted to tool developers, researchers, librarians, archivists, instructors, and graduate students from across the UC system. The event is open to all interested and will be especially of interest to those already working in Omeka to develop digital asset libraries, curate research material, teach visual arts, or cultivate digital literacies.
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Thursday, May 7 / LIVING WRITER SERIES / Jared Harvey, Gabriela Ramirez-Chavez, Whitney De Vos, Nicholas James Whittington, Eric Sneathen / 6:00-7:45pm / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

Jared Harvey is a an author of several chapbooks, including Commuting: Have Gone to Ithaca. – Frank Quitely, Hosni Mubarak, Mammal, and his most recent chapbook Here You Are (co-authored with Sara Peck.

Gabriela Ramirez-Chavez is a Guatemalan-American poet originally from Los Angeles, California. Gaby’s work has appeared in Plath Profiles, Kweli, and The Acentos Review. Her graduate research at UCSC is focused on literature by Central Americans and US Central Americans about the state violence and forced disappearances in the isthmus in the 1970s and 1980s, and the ongoing struggle for justice.

Whitney De Vos has been recognized for her poetry with numerous honors, and is a PhD student at UC Santa Cruz concentrating on 20th and 21st century American poetry, poetics, and politics.

Nicholas James Whittington was born and raised in the City of San Francisco. He is currently a PhD student at UCSC and the editor at AMERARCANA: The Bird & Beckett Review, a serial publication of poetry, creative & critical prose, other words & works of art.

Eric Sneathen lives in Santa Cruz, California, where he is studying for his PhD in Literature. His reviews have been published by Small Press Distribution and Tripwire, and his poetry has been published by Mondo Bummer, The Equalizer, and Faggot Journal.
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Thursday, May 7 / CENTER FOR LABOR STUDIES / “Working for Dignity: The Santa Cruz County Low-Wage Worker Study, Photo Exhibit, and Community Dialog” / 7:00-9:00pm / Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History

This campus-community event will showcase the findings of a year-long research and multi-media project on workers and working conditions in low-wage jobs in Santa Cruz County. We will unveil a new public digital exhibit and website featuring stories told by local workers, as well as the results of the large-scale survey and interview project carried out by UC Santa Cruz students. Workers and students will also share their stories and art work. The event will conclude with an open community dialog on issues facing low-wage workers in our County and possible steps forward.

Sponsored by the UCSC Center for Labor Studies, Chicano Latino Research Center, Everett Program, Institute for Humanities Research, Division of Social Sciences, UC Humanities Research Institute, California Rural Legal Assistance, Santa Cruz Day Worker Center, and the Museum of Art and History.

Refreshments will be served. This event is free and open to the public.

For more information click here or contact Alina Fernandez (aifernan@ucsc.edu) and Steve McKay (smckay@ucsc.edu)
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Of Interest Events for the Week of April 27, 2015

 

Wednesday, April 29 / HISTORY OF ART & VISUAL CULTURE / Sylvester Ogbechie / “Transcultural Interpretation and the Production of Alterity: Photography, Materiality, and Mediation in the Making of ‘African Art’” / 4:00-5:00pm / Porter College, Room D245

Thursday, April 30 / PHILOSOPHY COLLOQUIA / Shelly Wilcox / “Immigration Justice in Nonideal Circumstances” / 4:15-5:45pm / Humanities 2, Room 259

Thursday, April 30 / LIVING WRITER SERIES / Marilyn Chin / 6:00-7:45pm / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

Friday, May 1 / FRIDAY FORUM FOR GRADUATE RESEARCH / Kali Rubaii / “Writing the Future with a Cement Pen: How to Concretize Displacement” / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

Friday, May 1 / POETRY & POLITICS RESEARCH CLUSTER / James Beneda, Whitney DeVos, Ariane Helou, Katie Lally, Kenan Sharpe, Eric Sneathen, & Melissa Yinger / “Counteractions: A Symposium of Creative & Critical Inquiries” / 9:30am-5:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

 

* To advertise your unit or department’s event in the “Of Interest” section of this weekly bulletin, please e-mail complete event information in text format (no PDFs) to cult@ucsc.edu no later than noon on Friday of the prior week.

* Additional information and regular updates on “Of Interest” events can be found on the IHR website.

 


OF-INTEREST EVENT DESCRIPTIONS:

Wednesday, April 29 / HISTORY OF ART & VISUAL CULTURE / Sylvester Ogbechie / “Transcultural Interpretation and the Production of Alterity: Photography, Materiality, and Mediation in the Making of ‘African Art’” / 4:00-5:00pm / Porter College, Room D245

Sylvester Okwunodu Ogbechie (Ph.D. Northwestern University, 2000) is Professor of Art History and Visual Culture of Global Africa at the University of California Santa Barbara. He is the author of Ben Enwonwu: The Making of an African Modernist (University of Rochester Press, 2008: winner of the 2009 Herskovits Prize of the African Studies Association for best scholarly publication in African studies), Making History: The Femi Akinsanya African Art Collection (Milan: 5 Continents Editions, 2011), and editor of Artists of Nigeria (Milan: 5 Continents Editions, 2012). Ogbechie is also the founder and editor of Critical Interventions: Journal of African Art History and Visual Culture. He organized and coordinated the First International Nollywood Convention and Symposium (Los Angeles, June 2005) and subsequently founded in 2006 the Nollywood Foundation, which produced annual African film conventions in Los Angeles. Ogbechie has received prestigious fellowships, grants and awards for his research from the American Academy in Berlin, Getty Research Institute, Rockefeller Foundation, Institute for International Education, Smithsonian Institution and the Ford Foundation. His current research focuses on the role of cultural informatics and new media in analysis of the art and cultural patrimony of Africa and its Diaspora in the age of globalization.

Refreshments will be available before the talk.
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Thursday, April 30 / PHILOSOPHY COLLOQUIA / Shelly Wilcox / “Immigration Justice in Nonideal Circumstances” / 4:15-5:45pm / Humanities 2, Room 259

In recent years, political philosophers have begun to interrogate the methodology they use to construct normative principles. Some have voiced the concern that prevailing liberal egalitarian principles are constructed under idealized assumptions and thus are ill-suited to real-world circumstances where such assumptions do not apply. Specifically, critics have raised three related objections to so-called ideal theory: (1) ideal theory cannot help us understand current injustices in the actual, nonideal world; (2) ideal principles are not sufficiently action-guiding; and (3) ideal theory is counterproductive or even dangerous because it tends to reflect and perpetuate illicit group privilege.

This paper explores recent work on the ethics of immigration in light of these methodological criticisms, focusing on the open borders debate. The central question in this debate is whether liberal states have a moral right to restrict immigration. I argue that prominent arguments on both sides of this issue are subject to the standard criticisms of ideal theory, and thus that a nonideal normative approach to immigration in urgently needed. I then develop several methodological desiderata for such an approach and draw upon these criteria to outline the broad contours of an adequate nonideal theory of justice in immigration.

Shelley Wilcox is Professor of Philosophy at San Francisco State University. She works in the areas of social and political philosophy, feminist philosophy, and applied ethics, with a special interest in immigration, global justice, and urban environmental issues. She has published articles on the ethics of immigration and globalization in Philosophical Studies, Social Theory and Practice, Journal of Social Philosophy, Philosophy Compass, and The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, as well as in numerous anthologies. She is currently working on a book manuscript on urban environmental ethics and serving as Book Review Editor of Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy.
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Thursday, April 30 / LIVING WRITER SERIES / Marilyn Chin / 6:00-7:45pm / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

Marilyn Chin is an award-winning poet and the author of Revenge of the Mooncake Vixen, Rhapsody in Plain Yellow, The Phoenix Gone, the Terrace Empty and Dwarf Bamboo. Her writing has appeared in The Norton Anthology of Modern and Contemporary Poetry.

She was born in Hong Kong and raised in Portland, Oregon. Her books have become Asian American classics and are taught in classrooms internationally. Marilyn Chin has read her poetry at the Library of Congress. She was interviewed by Bill Moyers’ and featured in his PBS series The Language of Life and in PBS Poetry Everywhere. She can be found online at: http://www.marilynchin.org/
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Friday, May 1 / FRIDAY FORUM FOR GRADUATE RESEARCH / Kali Rubaii / “Writing the Future with a Cement Pen: How to Concretize Displacement” / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:00 to 1:30PM and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. Light refreshments will be available.
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Friday, May 1 / POETRY & POLITICS RESEARCH CLUSTER / James Beneda, Whitney DeVos, Ariane Helou, Katie Lally, Kenan Sharpe, Eric Sneathen, & Melissa Yinger / “Counteractions: A Symposium of Creative & Critical Inquiries” / 9:30am-5:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

The Poetry & Politics Research Collective present “Counteractions: A Symposium of Creative & Critical Inquiries”. The event will feature papers from UCSC graduate students: James Beneda, Whitney DeVos, Ariane Helou, Katie Lally, Kenan Sharpe, Eric Sneathen, & Melissa Yinger. Roundtable conversations will be lead by Christopher Chen, Kendra Dority, Johanna Isaacson, Kyle Lane-McKinley, Brian Malone, Tsering Wangmo, Tim Willcutts, & others. Please also join us the previous evening, April 30, for a poetry reading in downtown Santa Cruz. For more information, including a full schedule, please see our website: http://www.ucscpoetrypolitics.com
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Of Interest Events for the Week of April 20, 2015

 

Tuesday, April 21 / HISTORY DEPARTMENT / Ernesto Chávez / “My Dear Noël”: Ramón Novarro, Noël Sullivan, and the Negotiation of a Catholic/Mexican/Queer Identity” / 2:00-3:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 520

Wednesday, April 22 / SCIENCE AND JUSTICE / “Fixing the Pathological Body” / 4:00-6:00pm / Engineering 2, Room 399

Thursday, April 23 / SOCIOLOGY COLLOQUIA / Bron Taylor / “Spirituality After Darwin: ‘Dark Green’ Nature Religion and the Future of Religion and Nature” / 12:00-1:45pm / College 8, Room 201

Thursday, April 23 / LIVING WRITER SERIES / Terri Witek & Jai Arun Ravine / 6:00-7:45pm / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

Friday, April 24 / FRIDAY FORUM FOR GRADUATE RESEARCH / Rose Grose / “A Sexual Empowerment Process for Heterosexual and Sexual Minority Women” / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

Friday, April 24 / SESNON GALLERY / “An Uncommon Place: Shaping the UC Santa Cruz Campus / 4:00-6:00pm / Sesnon Art Gallery

Saturday, April 25 / LITERATURE DEPARTMENT – ALUMNI WEEKEND / “Celebrating 50 Years of Literature” / 11:00am-1:00pm / Kresge College, Room 327

Saturday, April 25 / HISTORY DEPARTMENT – ALUMNI WEEKEND / “Tales as Tall as the Redwoods: Reflections on UCSC’s Founding Years” / 2:00-3:30pm / Stevenson Fireside Lounge

Saturday, April 25 / UC PRESIDENTIAL CHAIR IN FEMINIST CRITICAL RACE AND ETHNIC STUDIES– ALUMNI WEEKEND / “Teach In: Bettina Aptheker” / 2:30-4:00pm / Stevenson, Room 150

Saturday, April 25 / DIGITAL ARTS & NEW MEDIA / Digital Arts MFA Exhibition & 10th Anniversary / All Day / DARC

 

* To advertise your unit or department’s event in the “Of Interest” section of this weekly bulletin, please e-mail complete event information in text format (no PDFs) to cult@ucsc.edu no later than noon on Friday of the prior week.

* Additional information and regular updates on “Of Interest” events can be found on the IHR website and on the Cultural Studies website.

 


OF-INTEREST EVENT DESCRIPTIONS:

Tuesday, April 21 / HISTORY DEPARTMENT / Ernesto Chávez / “My Dear Noël”: Ramón Novarro, Noël Sullivan, and the Negotiation of a Catholic/Mexican/Queer Identity” / 2:00-3:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 520

Ernesto Chávez, Associate Professor of History at the University of Texas, El Paso, and Visiting Researcher at the UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center, reads expressions of devout Catholicism and queer codes in the early- and mid-twentieth-century letters of silent screen actor, Ramón Novarro, and arts philanthropist Noël Sullivan.
In this presentation, Ernesto Chávez offers preliminary thoughts on materials pertaining to Ramón Novarro, the Mexican-born, gay, silent screen actor and devout Roman Catholic. Novarro, the subject of Professor Chávez’s current book project, was perhaps best known for playing the title role in the 1925 version of Ben-Hur, which propelled him to stardom. The bulk of his career occurred at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and after his stardom waned, he continued to act in movies and television until his violent murder at the hands of a hustler in 1968. The manner of his death ensured that he was outed posthumously. Yet, if one reads interviews with him and letters that he wrote to friends, queer codes that deflected his homosexuality emerge. Such is the case with the 102 letters that he wrote to Bay Area arts philanthropist Noël Sullivan. The letters, which are housed at UC Berkeley’s Bancroft Library, are the basis of this talk. In these missives, Novarro expressed his devout Catholicism to Sullivan, who was both gay and Catholic. The letters provide insight into a platonic relationship between two gay men in the early to mid-twentieth century and allow us to glimpse an intimacy that was mitigated by religiosity, but that nonetheless had at its core a common homosexuality.

Ernesto Chávez, Associate Professor of History at the University of Texas, El Paso, is currently a Visiting Researcher at the UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center and Institute of American Cultures. His work intersects Chicano/a, Latino/a, and Borderlands History and examines the history of the American Southwest, focusing on the matrix of race, class, and sexuality throughout the ethnic Mexican and Latino American past. In 2014, he received the American Historical Association’s Equity Award.
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Wednesday, April 22 / SCIENCE AND JUSTICE / “Fixing the Pathological Body” / 4:00-6:00pm / Engineering 2, Room 399

The medical industry leans heavily upon a distinction between the “normal” and the “pathological.” Panelists Janette Dinishak (Assistant Professor of Philosophy, UCSC) Kelly Ormond (Professor of Genetics, Stanford School of Medicine) and Matthew Wolf-Meyer (Associate Professor of Anthropology, UCSC) will discuss how we continue to define pathology, and what work this sort of categorization produces. We will discuss alternative ways to organize and understand the lived experiences of human bodies and/or minds.
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Thursday, April 23 / SOCIOLOGY COLLOQUIA / Bron Taylor / “Spirituality After Darwin: ‘Dark Green’ Nature Religion and the Future of Religion and Nature” / 12:00-1:45pm / College 8, Room 201

New Religions come and go but some persist and become major global forces. In this presentation Professor Taylor presents evidence that, especially since Charles Darwin published On the Origin of Species in 1859, a new, global, earth religion has been rapidly spreading around the world. Whether it involves conventional religious beliefs in non- material divine beings, or is entirely naturalistic and involves no such beliefs, it considers nature to be sacred, imbued with intrinsic value, and worthy of reverent care. Those having affinity with such spirituality generally have strong feelings of belonging to nature, express kinship with non-human organisms, and understand the world to be deeply interconnected. In a recent book Taylor labeled such phenomena ‘dark green religion’, noting that its central ethical priority is to defend the earth’s biocultural diversity. Taylor provides a wide variety of examples of new forms of religious (and religion-resembling) cultural innovation among those promoting such nature spirituality, from individuals (including artists, scientists, filmmakers, photographers, surfers, and environmental activists), to institutions (including museums, schools, and the United Nations). By tracking these, Taylor provides an opportunity to consider what such spirituality may portend for the religious and planetary future.

Bron Taylor is Professor of Religion, Nature, and Environmental Ethics at the University of Florida, and a Carson Fellow of the Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society in Munich Germany.
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Thursday, April 23 / LIVING WRITER SERIES / Terri Witek & Jai Arun Ravine / 6:00-7:45pm / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

Terri Witek is the author of Exit Island, The Shipwreck Dress (both Florida Book Award medalists), Carnal World, Fools and Crows, Courting Couples (Winner of the 2000 Center for Book Arts Contest), First Shot at Fort Sumter/ Possum (a poetry/comics chapzine) and Robert Lowell and LIFE STUDIES: Revising the Self. A new chapbook, On Gavdos Ferry, and a new book of poems, Body Swap are forthcoming.

A professor of English at Stetson University, where she directs the creative writing program, her summer faculty positions have included the Prague Summer Literary Program, the West Chester Poetry Conference, Poetry by the Sea, and the DisQuiet International program in Lisbon, where she and Cyriaco Lopes run “The Fernando Pessoa Game.” They will be core faculty in Poetry in an Expanded Field in Stetson University’s new low-residency MFA program.

Jai Arun Ravine is a writer, dancer and graphic designer. They are the author of แล้ว AND THEN ENTWINE: LESSON PLANS, POEMS, KNOTS; IS THIS JANUARY; THE SPIDERBOI FILES; and the director of the short film “TOM/TRANS/THAI”, which has screened in Bangkok, Berlin, Los Angeles and San Francisco, among others. They hold an MFA in Writing & Poetics from Naropa University’s Jack Kerouac School. Creative and critical writing appears most recently in Transgender Studies Quarterly, Tarpaulin Sky Literary Journal, Eleven Eleven, EOAGH and TENDE RLOIN. A recipient of fellowships from ComPeung, Djerassi and Kundiman, they are a former Staff Writer for Lantern Review.
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Friday, April 24 / FRIDAY FORUM FOR GRADUATE RESEARCH / Rose Grose / “A Sexual Empowerment Process for Heterosexual and Sexual Minority Women” / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:00 to 1:30PM and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. Light refreshments will be available.
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Friday, April 24 / SESNON GALLERY / “An Uncommon Place: Shaping the UC Santa Cruz Campus / 4:00-6:00pm / Sesnon Art Gallery

Sesnon Reception at Porter koi pond and Curators’ walkthrough:
April 24, 4-6PM

Alumni Weekend campus walk with curators:
April 25, 2:15 PM, (meet at Cowell College)

Everyone agrees that the UC Santa Cruz campus is breathtaking. How was it created? An Uncommon Place traces decisive moments in the site’s early development. Here an innovative educational project engaged with a beautiful and challenging environment. The university took shape among steep ravines and dramatic trees in a way that respected as it transformed the landscape. Using architectural plans, photographs, and oral histories, the exhibition illustrates paths taken and not taken-decisions, constraints, and hopes. It celebrates the achievement of UCSC’s founding planners while analyzing the tensions and contradictions that were built into their project. Through its many subsequent transformations, the UC Santa Cruz campus remains an extraordinary work of environmental art.

Remembering these formative years can perhaps help us renew a powerful utopian experiment. At UC Santa Cruz, architecture and environment still conspire to create an uncommon place, a setting for teaching, research and imagination outside the bounds of the ordinary.

Sponsored by UCSC Alumni Association; Divisions of the Arts, Humanities, Physical and Biological Sciences, Social Sciences; Colleges: Cowell, Eight, Kresge, Oakes, Porter, and Stevenson; McHenry Library Special Collections & Archives; and University Relations.

In conjunction with An Uncommon Place exhibition, the Sesnon Gallery also presents, Rhythms of Place: Photographic Explorations of the UCSC Campus.
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Saturday, April 25 / LITERATURE DEPARTMENT – ALUMNI WEEKEND / “Celebrating 50 Years of Literature” / 11:00am-1:00pm / Kresge College, Room 327

In order to celebrate our tradition of working and teaching across national, linguistic, and disciplinary divides, the UCSC Literature Department is pleased host “50 Years of Literature at UCSC”, an event commemorating the achievement of Literature alumni and faculty. This special anniversary event will feature discussions with emeritus and current faculty, and UCSC alumni. It will take place at beautiful Kresge College, a perfect venue for lively, engaging conversation.

Schedule of the Day’s Events
Welcome: Professor Carla Freccero, Literature Department Chair
Panel One: Literature at UCSC: Then and Now: with Professor Emeritus Harry Berger, Jr., and Professors Vilashini Cooppan and H. Marshall (Marsh) Leicester, Jr.
Panel Two: The Literature Difference: A Student-Faculty Dialogue, with Professor and UCSC alumna Karen Bassi, Professor Susan Gillman, and Alumnus Stephen Richter
Reception and Light Lunch: Alumni, Literature faculty and staff
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Saturday, April 25 / HISTORY DEPARTMENT – ALUMNI WEEKEND / “Tales as Tall as the Redwoods: Reflections on UCSC’s Founding Years” / 2:00-3:30pm / Stevenson Fireside Lounge

To commemorate UC Santa Cruz’s 50th Anniversary, the Department of History has invited a few distinguished faculty emeriti and alumni to share stories about their experiences at UC Santa Cruz during its early years. This is a rare opportunity to hear the oral histories of the individuals who helped shape the future of our beloved campus.

Our engaging list of panelists includes: Peter Kenez (Professor Emeritus), David Thomas (Professor Emeritus), Gregg Herken (Stevenson ’69), Linda Peterson (Stevenson ’70), and Gail Hershatter – Moderator.
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Saturday, April 25 / UC PRESIDENTIAL CHAIR IN FEMINIST CRITICAL RACE AND ETHNIC STUDIES– ALUMNI WEEKEND / “Teach In: Bettina Aptheker” / 2:30-4:00pm / Stevenson, Room 150

Attend a lecture entitled “Feminism & Social Justice” from faculty professor of feminist studies Bettina Aptheker.

Join fellow alums for a lively look at current movements in social justice and the ways in which gender, race, class, and sexuality interconnect with each other.

From birth matters to thinking about prisons, from queer stakes to transgender identities, from immigrant lives to environmental justice in scores of communities across the country, these issues animate and agitate. Join in debate, dialogue and discussion.
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Saturday, April 25 / DIGITAL ARTS & NEW MEDIA / Digital Arts MFA Exhibition & 10th Anniversary / All Day / DARC

New Alchemy, 2015 MFA Exhibition: 10am – 8pm, DARC
Alumni Tour: 2pm – 3pm
Curator & Director’s Remarks, 5pm
Reception, 5pm – 8pm
Faire of Making and Lab Open House: 10am – 4pm, DARC Patio
Alumni PechaKucha: 10am – 1pm, DARC Room 230
Masquerade Ball: 8pm – 10pm, DARC Patio

In honor of the golden anniversary of UC Santa Cruz and the tenth anniversary of the DANM program, twelve emerging artists have come together to present NEW ALCHEMY, a group exhibition exploring various processes of transformation. This year’s works include sculptural installations, interactive documentary, playable digital media experiences, and even the re-creation of a 1940s shantyboat. Curated by Jaime Austin.

Of Interest Events for the Week of April 13, 2015

 

Wednesday, April 15 / ANTHROPOLOGY COLOQUIA / Juned Shaikh / “Revolutionary Desires, Spatial Entanglements: Dalit Literature and Bombay City, 1950-1982” / 3:15-5:00pm / Social Sciences 1, Room 261

Wednesday, April 15 / VISUAL AND MEDIA CULTURES COLLOQUIA / Thomas Poell / “Social Media Mechanisms” / 4:00-6:00pm / Porter College, Room D245

Thursday, April 16 / LIVING WRITER SERIES / Janice Lee / 6:00-7:45pm / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

Thursday, April 16 / FILM + DIGITAL MEDIA / Screening: “The Overnighters” / 7:00pm / Communications 150 (Studio C)

Thursday, April 16 / CENTER FOR EMERGING WORLDS / Dr. Amina Wadud” / “Muslim Women: Equality and Justice Movements Globally / 7:00-9:00pm / Kresge Town Hall

Friday, April 17 / FRIDAY FORUM FOR GRADUATE RESEARCH / Evan Grupsmith / “Revolutionary Movement: Class Based Inclusion and Exclusion in the Cultural Revolution Chuanlian Movement” / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

 

* To advertise your unit or department’s event in the “Of Interest” section of this weekly bulletin, please e-mail complete event information in text format (no PDFs) to cult@ucsc.edu no later than noon on Friday of the prior week.

* Additional information and regular updates on many “Of Interest” events can be found on the IHR website.
 

OF-INTEREST EVENT DESCRIPTIONS:

Wednesday, April 15 / ANTHROPOLOGY COLOQUIA / Juned Shaikh / “Revolutionary Desires, Spatial Entanglements: Dalit Literature and Bombay City, 1950-1982” / 3:15-5:00pm / Social Sciences 1, Room 261

Marathi Dalit literature produced a Dalit public and articulated a Dalit identity in the 1960s and 70s. By the end of the 1970s, Dalit literature was recognized as a distinctive category of Marathi literature; newspapers and magazines devoted special supplements to discuss it and the Marathi literature Department of Bombay University hired faculty teaching Dalit literature. Three recurring themes of Marathi Dalit literature suggest the spatial entanglements that produced it: a) the revolutionary transformation of the self and society, a theme that borrowed from and resonated with the desire for revolutionary change across the world in the 1960s and 70s b) the depiction of housing as a symbol of Dalit marginality which this paper puts in the context of the urban transformation of Bombay city in which slums were an eyesore, but a political-economic necessity c) the representation of villages and Dalits in villages as the subject of backwardness that needed to be transformed with the raising of political consciousness. The themes of revolution, urban built environment, and rural/agrarian transformation also reflect the entanglements of spatial scales – global, regional/national, and urban/rural that shaped Dalit lives in Bombay city. In other words, the paper argues that the social space of Dalit literature in this period was shaped by events and processes that had different temporalities that were articulated in the city at the time of significant projects of urban transformation and regional and global political-economic change. I elucidate this point through the study of literature, housing reports, newspapers, and pamphlets.
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Wednesday, April 15 / VISUAL AND MEDIA CULTURES COLLOQUIA / Thomas Poell / “Social Media Mechanisms” / 4:00-6:00pm / Porter College, Room D245

Thomas Poell is Assistant Professor of New Media and Digital Culture at the University of Amsterdam. His research is focused on social media and public communication around the globe. Together with professor José van Dijck, he leads the KNAW-‘Over Grenzen’ research program on ‘Social Media and the Transformation of Public Space’ (June 2013 until August 2015). The program investigates how public space is reconfigured in the new emerging ecosystem of social media and conventional mass media. http://home.medewerker.uva.nl/t.poell/
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Thursday, April 16 / LIVING WRITER SERIES / Janice Lee / 6:00-7:45pm / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

Janice Lee is a writer, artist, editor, designer, curator, instructor, and scholar. She is the author of KEROTAKIS (Dog Horn Press, 2010), Daughter (Jaded Ibis, 2011), and Damnation (Penny-Ante Editions, 2013). She also has several chapbooks, most recently a poetic collaboration with Will Alexander, The Transparent As Witness (Solar Luxuriance, 2013). She is currently working on several collaborations: a critical book on Bela Tarr’s Satantango with Jared Woodland and an ekphrastic project about decapitations in films with Michael du Plessis. The Sky Isn’t Blue: The Poetics of Spaces, a book of essays, is forthcoming from Civil Coping Mechanisms in 2016. She is Co-Editor of [out of nothing], Editor of the new #RECURRENT Novel Series for Jaded Ibis Press, Assistant Editor at Fanzine, Executive Editor at Entropy, and Founder/CEO of POTG Design. She currently lives in Los Angeles where she is a Co-Founder of Code Talk, a new initiative to teach web development to low-income women, and where she teaches Graphic Texts & Interface Culture at CalArts. She can be found online at http://janicel.com
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Thursday, April 16 / FILM + DIGITAL MEDIA / Screening: “The Overnighters” / 7:00pm / Communications 150 (Studio C)

Screening and Q&A with Director Jesse Moss. Short-listed for the 2015 Documentary Feature Oscar, THE OVERNIGHTERS (2014, 100 minutes) is a modern-day “Grapes of Wrath” in the form of a beautifully shot and paced verite film.

Filmed over a year by director and cinematographer Jesse Moss, the film is a deep exploration of what happens when a small, conservative community is confronted by a mighty river of desperate, job-seeking strangers.

Sponsored by the Arts Dean’s Fund of Excellence and the Department of Film and Digital Media. Co-Sponsored by the Department of Sociology.
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Thursday, April 16 / CENTER FOR EMERGING WORLDS / Dr. Amina Wadud” / “Muslim Women: Equality and Justice Movements Globally / 7:00-9:00pm / Kresge Town Hall

Muslim women are actively engaged–at every level and in every kind of community–to address the problems of obvious inequalities on the basis of gender. Still, while it is a cliche to say that Muslim women are not a monolith, there is a tendency for many outside of Muslim contexts to seek a single solution to address this inequality.

This presentation will give a critical reading of Muslim women’s reform movements with emphasis on the historical evolution and epistemological distinctions of three major perspectives: secular Muslim women, Islamist women and the rise of Islamic feminists. While this could be seen as a dynamic history it is relatively short history and still unfolding. Islamic feminism is a pro-faith/pro-feminist movement to construct knowledge about Islamic thought and to use that construction to challenge patriarchal authority. This knowledge construction challenges policies that oppress women in the name of Islam and hopes to transform Muslim cultures from inequality to justice and reciprocity. In particular, this presentation will discuss Dr. Wadud’s experiences as a resource scholar with Musawah, a global movement for reform in Muslim family law.

Dr. Amina Wadud is an African American scholar of gender and Islam with a focus on Qur’an exegesis. She has taught at the Islamic University of Malaysia, the Virginia Commonwealth University, and the Gadjah Mada University of Indonesia. Her first book, Qur’an and Woman: Rereading the Sacred Text from a Woman’s Perspective (1999), contributes a gender-inclusive reading to one of the most fundamental disciplines in Islamic thought, Qu’ranic exegesis. Her latest book, Inside the Gender Jihad: Women’s Reform in Islam (2006) continues her Qur’anic analysis but also provides extensive details about her experiences as a Muslim, wife, mother, sister, scholar, and activist.
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Friday, April 17 / FRIDAY FORUM FOR GRADUATE RESEARCH / Evan Grupsmith / “Revolutionary Movement: Class Based Inclusion and Exclusion in the Cultural Revolution Chuanlian Movement” / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

In late 1966, young people started to traverse the People’s Republic of China (PRC) to exchange revolutionary experiences. To encourage and direct Red Guard travel, the Cultural Revolution Small Group (the highest governmental authority during this time period) decreed that all “revolutionary students and teachers and Red Guards” would be able to travel for free in the PRC. Millions of people jumped at this opportunity and traveled all over the country. This movement was dubbed chuanlian (串连). Chuanlian was one of the dominant political activities for urban youth in the PRC. Grupsmith’s research shows, through looking at both state and first-person accounts, that the chuanlian movement was driven by interactions of autonomous Red Guards and the state (exemplified by state media and the Cultural Revolution Small Group). Chuanlian activities were initiated by autonomously acting Red Guards. The state reacted by encouraging the movement and channeling it through propaganda and provision of free travel and lodging, while simultaneously attempting to exclude those that had “bad” class backgrounds. State encouragement caused a drastic increase in Red Guard chuanlian activity. Red Guards largely rejected these class based exclusionary policies, and the movement was characterized by widespread cross-class participation.

The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:00 to 1:30PM and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. Light refreshments will be available.
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Of Interest Events for the Week of April 6, 2015

 

Monday, April 6 / DIRECTIONS IN DIGITAL HUMANITIES / Lisa Snyder / “The Devil is in the Detective Work: Researching and Reconstructing Cultural Heritage Sites with Special Emphasis on The World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893” / 12:15-2:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

Monday, April 6 / FILM + DIGITAL MEDIA ARTIST SERIES / Deborah Stratman / “Considered Intervals” / 7:00pm / Communications 150 (Studio C)

Tuesday, April 7 / CLASSICAL STUDIES / Adrienne Mayor / “The Warrior’s Husband: Theseus, Antiope, and the Amazons” / 5:00-6:30pm / Cowell Provost House

Wednesday, April 8 / SIKH AND PUNJABI STUDIES / Prakarsh Singh / “Gender-Differential Effects of Terrorism on Education: The Case of the Punjab Insurgency 1981-1993” / 3:30-5:00pm / Economics 2, Room 499

Wednesday, April 8 / VISUAL AND MEDIA CULTURES COLLOQUIA / Anne Cheng / “Ornamentalism and Aesthetic Being” / 4:00-6:00pm / Porter College, Room D245

Wednesday, April 8 / Public Reception / “An Uncommon Place: Shaping the UC Santa Cruz Campus” / 5:00-7:00pm / Sesnon Art Gallery

Thursday, April 9 / ANCIENT STUDIES / Yannis Galanakis / “The Diplomat, the Dealer and the Digger: Writing the History of the Antiquities Trade in 19th century Greece” / 4:30-7:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

Friday, April 10 / DEPARTMENT OF LANGUAGES AND APPLIED LINGUISTICS / “An Evening of Futuristic Musical Poetry with Luciano Chessa” / 5:00-6:00pm / Humanities 2, Room 259

Friday, April 10 / FRIDAY FORUM FOR GRADUATE RESEARCH / Jess Whatcott / “Abolition Feminism Against Eugenics in California Prisons” / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

Friday and Saturday, April 10-11 / UC PRESIDENTIAL CHAIR IN FEMINIST CRITICAL RACE AND ETHNIC STUDIES / “The Feminist Architecture of Gloria Anzaldúa: New Translations, Crossings and Pedagogies in Anzaldúan Thought” / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

 

* To advertise your unit or department’s event in the “Of Interest” section of this weekly bulletin, please e-mail complete event information in text format (no PDFs) to cult@ucsc.edu no later than noon on Friday of the prior week.

* Additional information and regular updates on many “Of Interest” events can be found on the IHR website.
 

OF-INTEREST EVENT DESCRIPTIONS:

Monday, April 6 / DIRECTIONS IN DIGITAL HUMANITIES / Lisa Snyder / “The Devil is in the Detective Work: Researching and Reconstructing Cultural Heritage Sites with Special Emphasis on The World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893” / 12:15-2:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

One might argue that the creation of a computer reconstruction of a cultural heritage site requires a curious mix of academic training, detective work, and obsession. Unlike automated or algorithmic technologies that record extant sites and artifacts, building a three-dimensional computer model of an ephemeral or long-demolished environment combines traditional historical methods with new technologies and results in an entirely new form of scholarly publication. Rather than a printed monograph, the hours spent in search of obscure details buried in primary source materials or pouring over archival manuscripts and photographs are transformed into an interactive learning environment for interrogation by students and secondary scholars. Using her computer reconstruction of the World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893 as a case study, Snyder will address the process of researching and reconstructing historic urban environments, the challenges of translating multi-media research materials into a cohesive computer model, and the opportunities for teaching and learning afforded by this new form of scholarship. (And, yes, obsession will be discussed.)

Lisa M. Snyder (Ph.D. UCLA) is an architectural historian and research scholar with UCLA’s Institute for Digital Research and Education (IDRE) and is an Associate Editor of Digital Studies / Le Champ Numérique.
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Monday, April 6 / FILM + DIGITAL MEDIA ARTIST SERIES / Deborah Stratman / “Considered Intervals” / 7:00pm / Communications 150 (Studio C)

Chicago-based artist and filmmaker Deborah Stratman makes work that investigates issues of power, control and belief, exploring how places, ideas, and society are intertwined. She has exhibited widely at venues including MoMA NY, Centre Pompidou, Hammer Museum, Mercer Union, Witte de With, the Whitney Biennial and festivals including Sundance, Viennale, CPH/DOX, Oberhausen, Ann Arbor, Full Frame and Rotterdam. Stratman is the recipient of Fulbright and Guggenheim fellowships, a Creative Capital grant and an Alpert Award. She teaches at the University of Illinois at Chicago.
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Tuesday, April 7 / CLASSICAL STUDIES / “The Warrior’s Husband: Theseus, Antiope, and the Amazons” / 5:00-6:30pm / Cowell Provost House

Fierce Amazons are at the center of some of the most famous Greek myths. Every great hero, from Heracles to Achilles, tangled with warrior queens, and Theseus captured and married the Amazon Antiope. Were Amazons mere figments of the Greek imagination? Combining classical myth and art, nomad traditions, and scientific archaeology, this lecture reveals intimate, surprising details and original insights about the fighting women known as Amazons, with a special focus on Antiope.

Adrienne Mayor’s most recent book is The Amazons: Lives and Legends of Warrior Women Across the Ancient World (Princeton 2014). She is also the author of numerous publications; other books include a biography of Mithradates, The Poison King, a nonfiction finalist for the 2009 National Book Award, and The First Fossil Hunters (2000). A research scholar in Classics and History of Science at Stanford, Mayor’s work is often featured on the BBC, The History Channel, National Geographic, History Today, and other media.
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Wednesday, April 8 / SIKH AND PUNJABI STUDIES / Prakarsh Singh / “Gender-Differential Effects of Terrorism on Education: The Case of the Punjab Insurgency 1981-1993” / 3:30-5:00pm / Economics 2, Room 499

This study explores the long-run effect of the 1981-1993 Punjab Insurgency on the educational attainment of adults who were between ages 6-16 years at the time of the insurgency. To examine the long-term effect of the insurgency on education, we use a large scale cross-sectional dataset – the 2005 India Human Development Survey. To explore the channels through which the conflict affected education, we use a unique historical dataset on the annual expenditure decisions by farmers (farm account surveys) for Punjab during 1978-1989. We combine both datasets with the annual district level data on major terrorist incidents from the South Asia Terrorism Portal (SATP). We find a substantial and statistically significant effect of terrorism on educational attainment by girls who were of school age during the conflict. We also identify the impact of terrorism at the household level. Households that had high ratios of girls to boys and who resided in the districts that experienced terrorist events, had reduced the amount of educational expenditures. This finding suggests that this reduction was one of the channels through which conflict affected education.

Prakarsh Singh is Assistant Professor of Economics at Amherst College, Massachusetts. A sampling of his recent work can be found at https://sites.google.com/site/prakarshsinghac/research.
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Wednesday, April 8 / VISUAL AND MEDIA CULTURES COLLOQUIA / Anne Cheng / “Ornamentalism and Aesthetic Being” / 4:00-6:00pm / Porter College, Room D245

What is the relationship between ornament and law? In what ways can the law be said to decorate a body, and what does it mean to recognize legal personhood as being indebted to a sartorial imagination? This talk juxtaposes a significant but little known nineteenth-century immigration case and a much more celebrated nineteenth-century photo archive as two “primal” moments in the collusion between law, visuality, race, and gender and argues that the juridical making of the raced body is also the moment in which that body disappears. This is, in short, a story about the critical shift in law and in visual culture from racialized visibility to racialized visuality, a turn that takes place as early as the nineteenth century and continues to impact how we think about race and visuality today.
Anne Anlin Cheng is Professor of English and the Center for African American Studies and Director for the Program in American Studies at Princeton University. She is the author of The Melancholy of Race: Assimilation, Psychoanalysis, and Hidden Grief (Oxford University Press) and Second Skin: Josephine Baker and the Modern Surface (Oxford University).
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Wednesday, April 8 / Public Reception / An Uncommon Place: Shaping the UC Santa Cruz Campus / 5:00-7:00pm / Sesnon Art Gallery

Curated by Emeriti Professors James Clifford, Michael Cowan, Virginia Jansen, and Emeritus Campus Architect Frank Zwar

Everyone agrees that the UC Santa Cruz campus is breathtaking. How was it created? An Uncommon Place traces decisive moments in the site’s early development. Here an innovative educational project engaged with a beautiful and challenging environment. The university took shape among steep ravines and dramatic trees in a way that respected as it transformed the landscape. Using architectural plans, photographs, and oral histories, the exhibition illustrates paths taken and not taken-decisions, constraints, and hopes. It celebrates the achievement of UCSC’s founding planners while analyzing the tensions and contradictions that were built into their project. Through its many subsequent transformations, the UC Santa Cruz campus remains an extraordinary work of environmental art.

Remembering these formative years can perhaps help us renew a powerful utopian experiment. At UC Santa Cruz, architecture and environment still conspire to create an uncommon place, a setting for teaching, research and imagination outside the bounds of the ordinary.

Exhibition Dates: Wednesday, April 8, 2015 – Saturday, May 9, 2015
Alumni Weekend: Sesnon Reception at Porter koi pond and Curators’ walkthrough, April 24, 4-6PM
Alumni Weekend campus walk with curators: April 25, 2:15 PM, meet at Cowell College

Sponsored by UCSC Alumni Association; Divisions of the Arts, Humanities, Physical and Biological Sciences, Social Sciences; Colleges: Cowell, Eight, Kresge, Oakes, Porter, and Stevenson; McHenry Library Special Collections & Archives; and University Relations.

In conjunction with An Uncommon Place exhibition, The Sesnon Gallery also presents, Rhythms of Place: Photographic Explorations of the UCSC Campus.
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Thursday, April 9 / ANCIENT STUDIES / Yannis Galanakis / “The Diplomat, the Dealer and the Digger: Writing the History of the Antiquities Trade in 19th century Greece” / 4:30-7:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

During the 19th century in Europe, new states were founded and nationalism and colonialism were strengthened; while some Empires disintegrated, others managed to maintain or even increase their power. At the same time, archaeology was transformed into a structured discipline and large-scale excavation projects commenced across the Mediterranean. The stories of the people behind the antiquities trade in Greece during the 19th century—the diplomats stationed in Athens, the local art dealers and the private diggers—help us write an important chapter in the social, economic, and cultural history of Europe and of Mediterranean archaeology as a whole. This lecture explores how the commodification of the past became interwoven with power politics and gave rise both to different attitudes toward collecting and to debates on cultural property, ownership and the value of things in our modern world.

Yannis Galanakis is Lecturer in Classics (Greek Prehistory), Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge Fellow and Director of Studies in Classics, Sidney Sussex College.

For more information, please contact hedrick@ucsc.edu
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Friday, April 10 / DEPARTMENT OF LANGUAGES AND APPLIED LINGUISTICS / “An Evening of Futuristic Musical Poetry with Luciano Chessa” / 5:00-6:00pm / Humanities 2, Room 259
An evening with Italian composer, performer, and musicologist Luciano Chessa. Chessa will perform Piedigrotta (a Futurist musical poem). Chessa is the author of Luigi Russolo, Futurist: Noise, Visual Arts, and the Occult (UC, 2012), the first English-language monograph dedicated to Russolo and the art of Noise. He has been performing futurist sound poetry for well over 10 years. He has been active in Europe, the U.S., Australia, and South America as a practitioner of world avantgarde music; his scholarly areas include both 20th-century and late-14th-century music. Compositions include a piano and percussion duet after Pier Paolo Pasoliniʼs “Petrolio.”

Reception to follow.
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Friday, April 10 / FRIDAY FORUM FOR GRADUATE RESEARCH / Jess Whatcott / “Abolition Feminism Against Eugenics in California Prisons” / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

Jess Whatcott is a graduate student in Politics. The presentation will address a 2013 report by Justice Now documenting hundreds of cases of illegal sterilizations of prisoners since the 1990’s. Using the frameworks of abolition feminism, reproductive justice, and queer of color critique Jess will theorize how gendered, racialized, and disabled prisoners are rendered precarious to reproductive abuse. Finally, the presentation examines the practice of abolition feminism and reproductive justice by Justice Now, as a radical intervention into hegemonic carceral feminisms and the on-going feminist and maternalist engagement with eugenics.

The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:00 to 1:30PM and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. Light refreshments will be available.
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Friday and Saturday, April 10-11 / UC PRESIDENTIAL CHAIR IN FEMINIST CRITICAL RACE AND ETHNIC STUDIES / “The Feminist Architecture of Gloria Anzaldúa: New Translations, Crossings and Pedagogies in Anzaldúan Thought” / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

Beginning with her co-editorship of This Bridge Called My Back: Writing by Radical Women of Color (1981) to the foundational Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza (1987) to the anthologies Making Face, Making Soul/Haciendo Caras (1990) and This Bridge We Call Home: Radical Visions for Transformation (2002), the collection of engagements in Interviews/Entrevistas (2000), The Gloria Anzaldúa Reader (2009) and her children’s books, the work of Gloria Evangelina Anzaldúa has greatly influenced critical race, feminist, queer and decolonizing theories of an active subjectivity and agency. Her worldview as intellectual, lesbian of color, poet, teacher privileges the knowledge that comes from experiencing life in-between spaces—the border dweller, the queer, the colored, and the mestiza. Embracing ambiguity, liminality and border thinking, Anzaldúa affirms life from within these spaces. Her call for women of color, particularly lesbians of color, to write, engage and interrogate the world, challenges the hegemony of knowledge production and categorical logic. The movement of U.S. third world feminists that Anzaldúa initiates centers coalitional politics and intersectional analysis of the lived experiences of women of color, yet there continues to be a problem of legibility, a misrecognition and appropriation of the theoretical contributions of these writers (Perez, 2010). The issue of legibility deflects scholars’ attention from engaging Anzaldúan thought in the critical ways that it deserves.
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