May 4, 2016 – Donna Haraway: “Manifestly Haraway”

Haraway Wolfe Poster image

Manifestly Haraway brings together Donna Haraway’s seminal “Cyborg Manifesto” and “Companion Species Manifesto.” Manifestly Haraway also includes a wide-ranging conversation between Haraway and Cary Wolfe on the history and meaning of the manifestos in the context of biopolitics, feminism, Marxism, human-nonhuman relationships, making kin, material semiotics, the negative way of knowing, secular Catholicism, and more.

Donna J. Haraway is distinguished professor emerita in the History of Consciousness Department at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She is the author of, among other works, “Primate Visions,” “Modest_Witness@Second_Millenium,” and “When Species Meet.”

Cary Wolfe is Bruce and Elizabeth Dunlevie Professor of English at Rice University, where he is also founding director of 3CT (Center for Critical and Cultural Theory). He is the author of “Zoontologies: The Question of the Animal and What Is Posthumanism?”

Date/Time
May 4, 2016 | 6:00-8:00 PM
Free and open to the public

]Venue
Humanities 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

April 6, 2016 – Sherene Seikaly: “Men of Capital: Scarcity and Economy in Mandate Palestine”

SEIKALY Poster

Men of Capital examines British-ruled Palestine in the 1930s and 1940s through a focus on economy. In a departure from the expected histories of Palestine, this book illuminates dynamic class constructions that aimed to shape a pan-Arab utopia in terms of free trade, profit accumulation, and private property. And in so doing, it positions Palestine and Palestinians in the larger world of Arab thought and social life, moving attention away from the limiting debates of Zionist-Palestinian conflict.

Professor Sherene Seikaly is a historian of capitalism, consumption, and development in the modern Middle East. She is Assistant Professor of History at UC Santa Barbara. She previously taught at the American University in Cairo. She is Co-founder and Co-editor of the important journal Jadaliyaa.

UC Santa Cruz’s Center for Emerging Worlds and the Center for Cultural Studies present this new series, Book Talks, which invites authors to read from their books and engage in discussion. Please visit the Center for Emerging Worlds’ website for more information on their work.

Date/Time
April 6, 2016 | 6:00-7:30 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue
Humanities Building 2, Room 259
University of California, Santa Cruz

March 9, 2016 – Anna Tsing: “The Mushroom at the End of the World: On the Possibility of Life in Capitalist Ruins”

TSING PosterA tale of diversity within our damaged landscapes, The Mushroom at the end of the World follows one of the strangest commodity chains of our times to explore the unexpected corners of capitalism. In all its contradictions, the matsutake mushroom offers insights into areas far beyond just mushrooms and addresses a crucial question: what manages to live in the ruins we have made? By investigating one of the world’s most sought-after fungi, The Mushroom at the End of the World presents an original examination in to the relation between capitalist destruction and collaborative survival within multispecies landscapes, the prerequisite for continuing life on earth.

Anna Tsing is Professor of Anthropology at UCSC and a Neils Bohr Professor at Aarhus University in Denmark, where she codirects Aarhus University Research on the Anthropocene (AURA). She is author of “Friction” and “In the Realm of the Diamond Queen.”

UC Santa Cruz’s Center for Emerging Worlds and the Center for Cultural Studies present this new series, Book Talks, which invites authors to read from their books and engage in discussion. Please visit the Center for Emerging Worlds’ website for more information on their work.

Date/Time
March 9, 2016 | 6:00-7:30 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue
Humanities Building 2, Room 259
University of California, Santa Cruz

February 24, 2016 – Gil Anidjar: “Blood: A Critique of Christianity”

ANIDJAR poster revised

 

Blood, according to Gil Anidjar, maps the singular history of Christianity. As a category for historical analysis, blood can be seen through its literal and metaphorical uses as determining, sometimes even defining Western Culture, politics, and social practice and their wide-ranging incarnations in nationalism, capitalism, and the law. Flowing across multiple boundaries, infusing them with violent precepts that we must address, blood undoes the presumed oppositions between religion and politics, economy and theology, and kinship and race.

Dr. Anidjar is professor of Religion, Comparative Literature, and Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies at Columbia University. His books include The Jew, The Arab: A History of the Enemy and Semites: Race, Religion, Literature.

UC Santa Cruz’s Center for Emerging Worlds and the Center for Cultural Studies present this new series, Book Talks, which invites authors to read from their books and engage in discussion. Please visit the Center for Emerging Worlds’ website for more information on their work.

Date/Time
February 24, 2016 | 6:00-7:30 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue
Humanities Building 2, Room 359
University of California, Santa Cruz