A woman, wearing glasses, stands against a wall.

January 24, 2018 – Megan Moodie: “Emerging Genres: What Lies between Fiction and Ethnography”

Megan Moodie’s work focuses on feminist political and legal anthropology and experimental ethnographic writing in India, East Europe, and the U.S. Moodie will read from her full-length novel-in-progress, The Wishful, based in part on fieldwork in Rajasthan, India, and discuss the relationship between aesthetics and analytics in ethnographic practice and textual production.

Megan Moodie is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at UC Santa Cruz.

Date/Time

January 24, 2018 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

January 31, 2018 – Derek Murray: “On Post-Blackness: Queer Satire in Contemporary African-American Art”

Derek Conrad Murray is an interdisciplinary theorist specializing in the history, theory and criticism of contemporary art, visual culture and cultural studies. Author of Queering Post-Black Art: Artists Transforming African-American Identity After Civil Rights, Murray is completing two additional book manuscripts, Regarding Difference: Contemporary African-American Art and the Politics of Recognition and Mapplethorpe and the Flower: Radical Sexuality and the Limits of Control.

Derek Murray is an Associate Professor in the Department of History of Art and Visual Culture at UC Santa Cruz.

Date/Time

January 31, 2018 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

A man is shown from the chest up in front of a wooden office door

February 7, 2018 – Roddey Reid: “Confronting Political Intimidation and Public Bullying: Affect and Activism in the Trump Era and Beyond”

Roddey Reid is Professor Emeritus of French Studies and Cultural Studies at the University of California, San Diego. Reid is the author three books including most recently of Confronting Political Intimidation and Public Bullying: A Citizen’s Guide for the Trump Era and Beyond; of Families in Jeopardy: Regulating the Social Body in France, 1750-1910; co-editor with Sharon Traweek of Doing Science + Culture; and author of Globalizing Tobacco Control: Anti-Smoking Campaigns in California, France, and Japan. His latest writing has been on trauma, daily life, and the culture of intimidation and bullying in the U.S. and Europe.

Date/Time

February 7, 2018 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

Need Ahuja holds a paper in front of a screen, on the right

February 14, 2018 – Neel Ahuja, “Reversible Human: Rectal Feeding, Gut Plasticity, and Racial Control in US Carceral Warfare”

Neel Ahuja’s research explores the relationship of the body to forms of imperial warfare and security. Focusing on the association of rectal feeding, used as a form of medical rape in CIA prisons, and bodily plasticity, the presentation argues that the terrorist body is not only a useful discursive figure in the current wars, but also an experimental material that can be used to modulate time, sensation, and resistance toward forms of racial control.

Neel Ahuja teaches in the interdisciplinary humanities programs at UC Santa Cruz.

Date/Time

February 14, 2018 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

Jodi Byrd looks down at notes

February 21, 2018 – Jodi Byrd, “Fire and Flood: Settler Colonialism and Pessimistic Indigenous Futurisms”

Caught within the both/and of dystopic collapse, the colonial fantasies of American futurities often reproduce themselves through nineteenth-century signs of the struggle for colonial dominance. This talk close reads HBO’s Westworld alongside LeAnne Howe’s Indian Radio Days to consider how procedural elements of technological play produce dystopic visions of American collapse as the failure of indigenous futures.

Jodi Byrd is Associate Professor of English and Gender Studies at the University of Illinois.

Date/Time

February 21, 2018 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

A portrait of Christina Gerhardt

February 28, 2018 – Christina Gerhardt, “The Legacy of 1968 & Global Cinema”

Christina Gerhardt is the author of Screening the Red Army Faction: Historical and Cultural Memory, and co-editor of 1968 and Global Cinema and Celluloid Revolt: German Screen Cultures and the Long Sixties. Currently, she is working on a new book project, 1968 and West German Cinemas, which examines the cinemas of West Germany’s long sixties that have long stood in the shadow of New German Cinema.

Christina Gerhardt is a Visiting Scholar at the UC Berkeley Institute of European Studies and the Harvard University Center for European Studies.

Date/Time

February 28, 2018 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

March 7, 2018 – Ben Breen, “Unknown Pleasures: Intoxication and Globalization in the Eighteenth Century”

Benjamin Breen’s current project is Age of Intoxication: The Origins of the Global Drug Trade, which examines the trade in medicinal drugs, poisons, and intoxicants in the Portuguese and British empires, circa 1640 to 1800. The book argues that the formation of ‘drugs’ as an epistemological, legal, and commercial category grew out of early modern colonialism.

Ben Breen is an Assistant Professor of History at UC Santa Cruz.

Date/Time

March 7, 2018 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

Brihony Doyle stands in front of a fence.

October 5, 2017 – Briohny Doyle, “Postapocalypse Now”

Briohny Doyle’s research positions the postapocalyptic imagination as a reply to apocalyptic forms that obliterate & totalize. Her work considers postapocalyptic literary & theoretical texts that move beyond revelation to consider the various breakdowns of capitalism through potent figures like the ruin, the virus, & the nomad. ​

Briohny Doyle is a Melbourne-based writer and academic. Her debut novel, The Island Will Sink, is the critically acclaimed first book published by The Lifted Brow. Her first book of nonfiction Adult Fantasy is out through Scribe in 2017.

Date/Time

October 5, 2017 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

A portrait of Carrie Smith is shown against a grey backdrop

October 11, 2017 – Carrie Smith, “Digital Feminist Futures: Creative Resistance, Art Activism, & the Affects of Political Practice”

Carrie Smith-Prei’s research examines how the digital restructures cultures of feminism, including creative materializations & world-making practices. It asks after the future of feminist craft & activism in the digital sphere & the meaning (and limits) of global feminist solidarity, intersectional community-building, & transnational collaboration in developing just futures on & offline.

Smith-Prei Associate Professor of of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies at the University of Alberta.

Date/Time

October 11, 2017 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

Judith Butler and María Inés La Greca are shown seated at a conference table.

October 18, 2017 – María Inés La Greca, “The Collective Shout of ‘Ni una menos’ (‘Not one less’) in the Streets, the Media & the University: Feminists & Women’s Movement Against Gender Violence in Argentina”

María Inés La Greca’s research focuses on the relationship between narrativity, performativity and gender. In light of Judith Butler’s work, especially her recent ethical interest on narrative, psychoanalysis & subject formation, her aim is to offer a critical reflection on discourse, embodiment & identity constitution in gender theory and feminist writing.

Inés La Greca is an adjunct professor at Tres de Febrero National University in Argentina.

Date/Time

October 18, 2017 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz