Brihony Doyle stands in front of a fence.

October 5, 2017 – Briohny Doyle, “Postapocalypse Now”

Briohny Doyle’s research positions the postapocalyptic imagination as a reply to apocalyptic forms that obliterate & totalize. Her work considers postapocalyptic literary & theoretical texts that move beyond revelation to consider the various breakdowns of capitalism through potent figures like the ruin, the virus, & the nomad. ​

Briohny Doyle is a Melbourne-based writer and academic. Her debut novel, The Island Will Sink, is the critically acclaimed first book published by The Lifted Brow. Her first book of nonfiction Adult Fantasy is out through Scribe in 2017.

Date/Time

October 5, 2017 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

A portrait of Carrie Smith is shown against a grey backdrop

October 11, 2017 – Carrie Smith, “Digital Feminist Futures: Creative Resistance, Art Activism, & the Affects of Political Practice”

Carrie Smith-Prei’s research examines how the digital restructures cultures of feminism, including creative materializations & world-making practices. It asks after the future of feminist craft & activism in the digital sphere & the meaning (and limits) of global feminist solidarity, intersectional community-building, & transnational collaboration in developing just futures on & offline.

Smith-Prei Associate Professor of of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies at the University of Alberta.

Date/Time

October 11, 2017 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

Judith Butler and María Inés La Greca are shown seated at a conference table.

October 18, 2017 – María Inés La Greca, “The Collective Shout of ‘Ni una menos’ (‘Not one less’) in the Streets, the Media & the University: Feminists & Women’s Movement Against Gender Violence in Argentina”

María Inés La Greca’s research focuses on the relationship between narrativity, performativity and gender. In light of Judith Butler’s work, especially her recent ethical interest on narrative, psychoanalysis & subject formation, her aim is to offer a critical reflection on discourse, embodiment & identity constitution in gender theory and feminist writing.

Inés La Greca is an adjunct professor at Tres de Febrero National University in Argentina.

Date/Time

October 18, 2017 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

Carla Freccero is shown giving a talk, with a laptop and microphone.

October 25, 2017 – Carla Freccero, “Queer/Animal/Theory: Psychoanalysis & Subjectivity”

Psychoanalysis is queer insofar as it does not presume a model of sexuality & gender from which to extrapolate a normative outcome. Likewise, psychoanalysis does not presume “the human” as the starting point for analyzing how adult human subjectivity is achieved. How might we describe a non-anthropocentric subjectivity in psychoanalytic & queer theoretical terms?

Carla Freccero is Distinguished Professor of Literature and History of Consciousness, and Professor of Feminist Studies, at UC Santa Cruz.

Date/Time

October 25, 2017 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

A profile of Najat Abulhaq speaking is shown.

November 1, 2017 – Najat Abdulhaq, “Unconventional Revision of Narratives: The Emergence of the ‘Arab Jew’ in Contemporary Arabic Literature”

For decades, two official nationalist narratives, Arab-Egyptian & Israeli, dominated the discourse on the history of Egypt’s Jews. Recently, a different narrative is emerging in the Arabic speaking sphere, with documentaries, films & novels taking a cardinal role in this process. How and why is this emergence taking place?

Najat Abdulhaq is the author of Jewish and Greek Communities in Egypt: Entrepreneurship and Business Before Nasser (I. B. Tauris).

Date/Time

November 1, 2017 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue
Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

Nirvikar Singh is shown in front of a blue curtain.

November 8, 2017 – Nirvikar Singh, “The Other One Percent? Indians in Trump’s America”

What is the selection process that governed the migration of people of Indian origin to the United States? How has that selection been important in determining of the economic success of this group? This talk highlights the diversity within this broad group, & the lessons of that diversity, and concludes by exploring some of the challenges that Indian Americans face as a minority in the contemporary United States & the implications of events in contemporary India.

Nirvikar Singh holds the Sarbjit Singh Aurora Chair of Sikh and Punjabi Studies at UC Santa Cruz. He also directs the UCSC South Asian Studies Initiative within the Division of Social Sciences.

Date/Time

November 8, 2017 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue
Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

To the left, On Barak is shown giving a lecture. To the right, a classroom of seated students.

November 15, 2017 – On Barak, “Against Energy: Provincializing Thermodynamics between Aden and Port Said”

Despite feigning perpetuity, “energy” is a child of its time, the nineteenth century. Born from the related challenges of steam engineering and British imperialism its legacies still haunt and limit our thinking on matters ranging from fossil fuels to race, from labor to the underground. This talk seeks to situate the emblematic energy source – coal – back in its imperial context, revealing what may be called “coalonialism” at play in the territories between the two major global fueling stations of the century, Aden and Port Said. Such acts of provincializing flesh out alternative ways for regarding fossil fuels, including ethical, political and environmental insights that the science of thermodynamics helped evaporate.

On Barak is currently completing a manuscript tentatively titled Coalonialism, Energy and Empire before the Age of Oil. The book is based on multi-sited research into the geopolitical, social, and cultural implications of energy shifts during the long nineteenth century, focusing on the “age of coal” in the Middle East, a region usually associated with oil.

Barak is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Middle Eastern & African History at Tel Aviv University.

Date/Time

November 15, 2017 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue
Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

Jenny Reardon is shown in a hallway.

November 29, 2017 – Jenny Reardon, “The Postgenomic Condition: Meaning & Justice After the Genome”

Jenny Reardon’s research draws into focus questions about identity, justice and democracy that are often silently embedded in scientific ideas and practices, particularly in modern genomic research. Her training spans molecular biology, the history of biology, science studies, feminist and critical race studies, and the sociology of science, technology and medicine.

Dr. Reardon is a Professor of Sociology and the Founding Director of the Science and Justice Research Center at the UC Santa Cruz.

Date/Time

November 29, 2017 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue
Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

 

May 31, 2017 – Shahzad Bashir, “Islamic Pasts and Futures: Conceptual Issues”

This talk emerges from Professor Bashir’s current project, Islamic Pasts and Futures: Conceptual Explorations, a critique of the conceptualization of Islamic history in modern scholarship. Bashir suggests alternatives emphasizing multiple temporalities and engaging contemporary academic debates regarding language, historiography, and history on the basis of materials of Islamic provenance.

Shahzad Bashir is professor in Islamic Studies and Director of the Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies at Stanford University

Date/Time

May 31, 2017 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue
Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

May 17, 2017 – Martin Devecka, “Socratic Economics”

Martin Devecka is in the early stages of a research project on leisure and labor in fourth-century Athens.  His work explores the processes through which competing claims to leisure and to the labor of others led to the privileging of politics as a way of thinking about collective action.

Martin Devecka is Assistant Professor of Literature and Classics at UCSC.

Date/Time

May 17, 2017 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue
Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz