A headshot of Professor Laurie Palmer

February 13, 2019 — A. Laurie Palmer: “Public Sun”

This talk traces connections between oil, sun, and distributed forms of power by discussing three in-process projects: a large-scale model of California, a book on lichen, and a public tribunal charging private property for crimes against the common.

A. Laurie Palmer ’s place-based work takes form as sculpture, public projects, and writing, and she collaborates on strategic actions in the contexts of social and environmental justice. Her book In the Aura of a Hole: Exploring Sites of Material Extraction (2014) investigates what happens to places where materials are removed from the ground, and how these materials, once liberated, move between the earth and our bodies. She is currently researching the shapes and structures of underground oil shale formations and continuing to develop work on The Lichen Museum, a massively distributed, inside-out institution that considers this slow, resistant, adaptive and collective organism as an anti-capitalist companion and climate change survivor.

Date/Time

February 13, 2019 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

A photo of sand dunes in the desert

February 20, 2019 — Jerry Zee: “Continent in Dust: China in Aerosol Phases”

This talk offers a political anthropology of strange weather. As Chinese deserts increasingly appear as latent dust storms, it tracks geo-meteorological phase shifts as they rework contemporary land and air into a substantial continuum. It tracks territorial governance as it shifts into experimental formations that draw into the choreographies of sand, wind, and dust that they seek to re-engineer.

Jerry Zee is an assistant professor at UCSC’s Anthropology Department. His work considers experiments in politics and environments in China’s meteorological contemporary.


Date/Time

February 20, 2019 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

Photo by Boris Ulzibat

A still from Dr. Dee Hibbert-Jones' animated film, "Last Day of Freedom," depicting a line drawing of a man speaking and a helicopter in the background

February 27, 2019 — Dee Hibbert-Jones: Last Day of Freedom & Run With It

Professor Hibbert-Jones will be screening her Academy Award®-nominated short film Last Day of Freedom. When Bill Babbitt realizes his brother Manny has committed a crime he agonizes over his decision- should he call the police? Last Day of Freedom is a richly animated personal narrative that tells the story of Bill’s decision to stand by his brother, a veteran returning from war, as he faces criminal charges, racism, and ultimately the death penalty. This film is a portrait of a man at the nexus of the most pressing social issues of our day – veterans’ care, mental health access, and criminal justice. She will discuss Last Day of Freedom as well as her upcoming animated documentary Run With It about Troy Davis, a black man accused of killing a white police officer in Savannah Georgia, USA.

Dee Hibbert-Jones is an Academy Award®-nominated, Emmy®-award winning documentary filmmaker, a Guggenheim Fellow, and a MacDowell Fellow. Working in collaboration with Nomi Talisman, she produces animated documentary films that explore the crisis in the criminal justice system and the US racial divide, challenging entrenched attitudes, immersing viewers in a complex world of feelings and experiences, engendering empathy and critical reflection. In 2015 they received the Filmmaker Award from the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke, created to honor and support documentary artists whose works are potential catalysts for education and change. Hibbert-Jones was recently awarded a United States Congressional Black Caucus Veterans Braintrust Award in recognition for her “outstanding national commitment to civil rights, and social justice” and a Gideon award for “support to indigent minorities” for her film work. She a Professor of Art, Film, and Digital Art New Media at the University of California, Santa Cruz.


Date/Time

February 27, 2019 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

 

Photo: Still from Last Day of Freedom (Dee Hibbert-Jones and Nomi Talisman)

A photo of Professor Camilla Hawthorne

March 6, 2019 — Camilla Hawthorne: “On Diasporic Ethics: Locating the Black Mediterranean in Italian Citizenship Struggles”

This talk examines the possibilities and limitations of the “Black Mediterranean” (which emphasizes the power-laden relations of cultural exchange and racial violence linking Europe and Africa) as an analytical framework for understanding the historical and contemporary forms of racial criminalization and racialized citizenship in Italy. The emergent “Black Italian” movement in Italy has been increasingly confronted with the limits of national citizenship as a means for addressing racial inequality. In response, activists have begun to turn toward alternative political imaginaries and practices of community that extend far beyond the Italian nation-state. In this context, what can the Black Mediterranean open up in terms of new political praxes and transgressive alliance? Specifically, how might this framework help to bridge Black liberation politics in Italy with refugee rights mobilizations?

Camilla Hawthorne is Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Inequality in the Department of Sociology at UC Santa Cruz. She is a principal faculty member in the Critical Race and Ethnic Studies Program, and a faculty affiliate of the Science & Justice Research Center at UCSC. Camilla received her PhD in Geography with a designated emphasis in Science and Technology Studies from UC Berkeley in 2018. She also holds an MPA from Brown University. Camilla’s work addresses the politics of migration and citizenship, racism and inequality, and social movements. Her book project, tentatively titled Different Waters, Same Sea: Contesting Racialized Citizenship in the Black Mediterranean, explores the politics of race and citizenship in contemporary Italy. She is also co-editing a volume about Black Geographies with Dr. Jovan Scott Lewis of UC Berkeley, as well as a volume on racial subordination and resistance in the Mediterranean. Camilla serves as faculty member and project manager of the Summer School on Black Europe in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.


Date/Time

March 6, 2019 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

A photo of Professor Dai Jinhua. She is facing the camera and is wearing glasses.

March 13, 2019 — Dai Jinhua: “The Specter of Post-Revolution”

In this talk, Professor Dai Jinhua addresses the challenges for theorists and activists alike in these post-revolutionary times.  She begins by analyzing the terms “post-revolution” and “specter.” She argues that the “post” in post-revolution does not indicate the end of revolution. Rather, it points to the past and future of revolution and the ways that memories and imaginations of revolution still persist in various forms and haunt the present.  If we refuse the verdict that the revolution is over, if we refuse cynicism and the idea that there is no alternative outside of global capitalism, then how should we proceed?

Professor Dai answers this question by way of considering the novel cultural productions at the intersection of new technologies and new forms of media. She discusses three cultural sequences across different genres and media, such as internet novels, television dramas, films, and internet dramas derived from popular publications.  These cultural series include 1)ancient historical costume dramas; 2) contemporary reconstructions of the monkey king Sun Wukong; and 3) danmei internet novels (novels that narrate intimate romantic relationships between men and whose main readership is almost exclusively women).

In this new context of cultural production, we must reconsider our most basic concepts, such as “the author,” “to write,” “to create,” “originality,” and “ideology.”  In examining these cultural productions, Professor Dai highlights the different approaches to history and the differences in popular consciousness between the revolutionary generation (her own) and the post-revolutionary generation.

Dai Jinhua is an internationally well-known feminist Marxist critic. She is a Professor in the Institute of Comparative Literature and Culture and director of the Center for Film and Cultural Studies, Peking University. Her research interests include popular culture, film studies, and gender studies.

Date/Time

March 13, 2019 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

Co-Sponsored by the Center for Emerging Worlds

A photo of a crosswalk in New York City taken from a street corner. Vendors, pedestrians, and taxis line the street and sidewalk.

October 10, 2018 – Chris Benner: “A Universal Technology Dividend? Rethinking Price, Value, Work, and the Commons”

Benner’s current work considers the idea of a Universal Technology Dividend. This talk will explore questions related to the common-property characteristics of technology and innovation, the monopolistic characteristics of information markets, and the need to rethink how we define work in contemporary labor markets.

Dr. Chris Benner is the Dorothy E. Everett Chair in Global Information and Social Entrepreneurship, and a Professor of Environmental Studies and Sociology at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He currently directs the Everett Program for Technology and Social Change and the Santa Cruz Institute for Social Transformation. His research examines the relationships between technological change, regional development, and the structure of economic opportunity, focusing on regional labor markets and the transformation of work and employment. He has authored or co-authored six books (most recently Equity, Growth and Community, 2015, UC Press) and more that 70 journal articles, chapters and research reports. He received his Ph.D. in City and Regional Planning from the University of California, Berkeley.

Date/Time

October 10, 2018 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

Black and white photo of five people playing soccer. In the background, the soccer field is bordered by a fence; beyond the fence are multiple industrial smokestacks.

October 17, 2018 – Sharad Chari: “Apartheid Remains”

“Apartheid Remains” explores how people subjected to life in a patchwork landscape of industry and residence in the Indian Ocean City of Durban, South Africa, have sought to contest their social and spatial subjection across the 20th century, particularly in the revolutionary 1970s and 1980s, and in today’s racial capitalism.

Sharad Chari is a geographer working at the interface of political economy, historical ethnography, Marxist geography, agrarian studies, Black and subaltern radical traditions and oceanic studies. He has spent time at the Michigan Society of Fellows and the ‘Anthrohistory’ program at Michigan, Geography at the LSE, and Anthropology at the University of the Witwatersrand, before returning to Berkeley Geography. Sharad is a scholar of agrarian transition and industrialization in South India (his first book, Fraternal Capital, 2004) and has been working on South Africa since 2002 (on the book project Apartheid Remains which he is speaking from.) He has also begun new work on an oceanic conception of capitalism, in relation to the fetishism of ‘the Ocean Economy’ in the Southern African Indian Ocean region, focusing on the South African and Mozambican Indian Ocean littorals, Réunion and Mauritius. At Berkeley, he is also part of Berkeley Black Geographies and the Submergent Archive, both collective projects in Geography Department, and at WiSER he is part of the project on the Oceanic Humanities in the Global South.

Date/Time

October 17, 2018 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

Photo by Cedric Nunn

A photo of the Geneva UN building

October 24, 2018 – CANCELLED – Ashwini Tambe: “Tropical Exceptions: Racial Logics in Twentieth Century Intergovernmental Age of Consent Debates”

–CANCELLED–

–Dr. Tambe’s visit will be rescheduled for another date during the 2017-18 academic year–

This talk traces how intergovernmental efforts at setting common age standards for sexual consent and marriage occasioned elaborate posturing and coding of racial difference. In discussing the proceedings of two UN cases, Tambe demonstrates how seemingly neutral age categories became a means to express geopolitical hierarchies and undercut formal liberal relationships of equivalence.

Ashwini Tambe studies how societies regulate sexual practices, and why sexual practices are freighted with political meaning. Her previous work has engaged the history of sex trade regulation in Bombay. Her forthcoming book focuses on age standards for sexual consent and the legal paradoxes in defining girlhood in India. She is also writing a book on academic feminism and the #MeToo movement, and co-editing a volume on the history and future of transnational feminist theory. She is the editorial director of Feminist Studies, the oldest US journal of feminist interdisciplinary scholarship.

Date/Time

October 24, 2018 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

Co-Sponsored by the Center for Emerging Worlds & the Department of Feminist Studies

Headshot of Dr. Michel Feher

October 31, 2018 – Michel Feher: “Creditworthiness: The Political Stake of a Speculative Age”

Feher’s current research and forthcoming book, Rated Agency: Investee Politics in a Speculative Age (Zone Books) examines the extraordinary shift in conduct and orientation generated by financialization, particularly the new political resistances and aspirations that investees draw from their rated agency.

Michel Feher is a philosopher who has taught at the École Nationale Supérieure, Paris, and at the University of California, Berkeley, and was recently a Visiting Professor at Goldsmiths, University of London. He is the publisher and a founding editor of Zone Books, NY (in 1986) as well as the president and co-founder of Cette France-là, Paris (in 2008), a monitoring group on French immigration policy. He is the author of Powerless by Design: The Age of the International Community (2000) and, most recently, of Rated Agency: Investee Politics in a Speculative Age (2018); the co-author, with Cette France-là, of Xénophobie d’en haut: le choix d’une droite éhontée (2012) and Sans-papiers et préfets: la culture du résultat en portraits (2012) and the co-editor of Nongovernmental Politics (2007), with Gaëlle Krikorian and Yates McKee, and of Europe at a Crossroads/near Futures Online, with William Callison, Milad Odabaei and Aurélie Windels (2015).

Date/Time

October 31, 2018 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

Co-Sponsored by The Humanities Institute Research Cluster, “After Neoliberalism”

A photo taken from the sky of a sunken ship partially submerged in the ocean

November 7, 2018 – Kevin Dawson: “History Below the Waterline: Enslaved Salvage Divers Harvesting Seaports’ Hinter-Seas, c.1540-1840”

Dawson’s scholarship demonstrates how enslaved Africans carried swimming, surfing, canoe-making, and canoeing skills to the Americas where they were exploited by slaveholders. This talk considers how enslaved Africans employed as salvage divers transformed shipwrecks, especially sunken Spanish treasure ships, into hinter-seas generating capital that financed terrestrial production throughout the English Empire.

Kevin Dawson grew up surfing, swimming, and free-diving in south Los Angeles County, all of which profoundly informed his scholarship. He received a BA from California State University, Fullerton and was awarded his PhD from the University of South Carolina in 2005, where his advisor was Dan Littlefield. Dawson’s scholarship and teaching focus on the African diaspora and Atlantic History from roughly 1444, when the Portuguese first sailed into Sub-Saharan Africa to 1888, when Brazil became the last country in the New World to abolish slavery. He has conducted research throughout the continental US, Hawai‘i, the Caribbean, and West Africa and has published articles in the Journal of American History and Journal of Social History, as well as several chapters in edited volumes. His book Undercurrents of Power: Aquatic Culture in the Africa Diaspora was published by the University of Pennsylvania Press in 2018.

Date/Time

November 7, 2018 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue/Location

Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz