Spring 2001 Colloquium Series

Colloquium Series

In Spring 2001, the Center for Cultural Studies will continue to host a Wednesday colloquium series, which features current cultural studies work by campus faculty and visitors. The sessions are informal, normally consisting of a 30-40 minute presentation followed by discussion. We gather at noon, with presentations beginning at 12:15. Participants are encouraged to bring their own lunches; the Center will provide coffee, tea, and cookies. 

 

ScheduleALL COLLOQUIA ARE IN THE OAKES MURAL ROOMApril 4
Radhika Mongia
(Women’s Studies, UC Santa Cruz )
Rethinking State Sovereignty or, Colonial Genealogies of the Modern State 

April 11
Anjali Arondekar
(Women’s Studies, UC Santa Cruz)
The Story of an India-Rubber Dildo: Locations of Desiere in Colonial Pornography 

April 18
Frazer Ward
(Art History, Maryland Institute, College of Art)
Notes on Approaching Marina Abramovic’s Rhythm 

April 25
Caroline Streeter
(UC President’s Postdoctoral Fellow, Sociology and the Center for Cultural Studies, UC Santa Cruz)
“I’m thinking if that Oprah got her a gun…”: African American Celebrity and Popular Culture in Gayl Jones’s ‘Mosquito and The Healing'”

May 2 
John Dean
(American Literature and Cultural Studies, University of Versailles St. Quentin en Yvelines)
How Twentieth Century American Subcultures Have Contributed to the Nation’s Pantheon of Popular Heroes

May 9
Bettina Aptheker
Memoir, Memory, and the Collective (De)Construction of Women’s History

May 16
Bob White
(Anthropology, UC Santa Cruz )
Cuban ‘Rumba’ and Other Cosmopolitanisms in the Belgian Congo (1949-1999)

May 23
Christopher Breu
(English, Illinois State University)
Come Fly With Me: Frank Sinatra and the Short American Century 

 

Participants

Radhika Mongia is Assistant Professor of Women’s Studies, UCSC. She is currently working on a book-length project, titled Genealogies of Globalization: Migration, Colonialism, and the State. The project focuses on the emergence of state technologies for controlling international migration examining, in particular, how the distinction between ‘legal’ and’illegal’ migration is historically produced. “Race, Natonality, Mobility: A History of the Passport,” a portion of this research, appeared in Public Culture, in Public Culture in 1999.

Anjali Arondekar is Assistant Professor in Women’s Studies at UCSC, having recently arrived from Smith College where she was the Andrew W. Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellow (1999-2001). Her research interests include queer studies, Victorian studies, critical race studies and post-colonial theory. She has published variously in the Journal of Asian Studies,Symploke, Post-Modern Culture and The Village Voice. Her most recent article, “Lingering Pleasures, Perverted Texts,” is forthcoming in collection entitled Queer Texts/Colonial Texts(University of Minnesota Press, 2002). She is currently co-editing a collection, Queer Postcolonialities: Borders, Limits and Margins, with Professor Geeta Patel, and also working on a book manuscript titled A Perverse Empire: Victorian Sexuality and the Indian Colony.

Frazer Ward is Assistant Professor of Art History at the Maryland Institute, College of Art, and currently Visiting Assistant Professor of Art History at Stanford University. He is working on a project dealing with Vietnam-era performance art, examining the ethical implications of the ways in which publics constitute themselves around violence and its representations. He has recently written an essay surveying Vito Acconci’s career, an essay on Chris Burden’s Shoot for the journal October, and guest-edited an issue of the journal Documents on the topic of privacy.

Caroline Streeter is a UC President�s Postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Cultural Studies and the Department of Sociology at UC Santa Cruz. She received her Ph.D. in Ethnic Studies with a Designated Emphasis in Women, Gender and Sexuality from UC Berkeley in 2000. Her postdoctoral research investigates how cultural work by black women negotiates the complex terrain of consumption in mass commercial culture. Shehas been active in the area of mixed-race scholarship, and her areas of research interest include narratives of race mixing in African American literature, film, and visual art, along with the politicized emergence of mixed-race identities i the post-Civil Right era. She is published in The Multiracial Experience (Sage, 1996) and has an essay in the forthcoming New Faces in a Changing America: Multiracial Identity in the 21st Century.

John Dean is on the faculty of the University of Versailles St. Quentin en Yvelines, where he teaches American literature and cultural studies. He has held research positions at the University of Strasbourg and the Kennedy Institute for American Studies in Berlin. His publications include European Readings of American Popular Culture (1996) and Restless Wanderers: Shakespeare and the Pattern of Romance(1979), several volumes on the United States published in French, a large number of articles on French and English language science fiction, as well as poetry, fiction, scholarly articles, and journalism on a wide range of topics. While at the Center this spring, he will work on several projects, among them a book on the hero and heroine in American popular culture.

Bettina Aptheker is Professor and Chair of Women’s Studies. Her books include: The Morning BreaksThe Trial of Angela Davis, second edition, Cornell University Press, 1999; Tapestries of Life: Women’s Work, Women’s Consciousness and the Meaning of Daily Experience, University of Massachusetts Press, 1989; Woman’s Legacy: Essays on Race, Sex and Class in American History, University of Massachusetts Press, 1982. She is near completion of work on a memoir.

Bob White, Assistant Professor in Anthropology at UC Santa Cruz, specializes in popular culture and politics in francophone Africa. His primary research examines the production and meaning of popular dance music in Congo-Zaire (now Democratic Republic of the Congo), where he conducted fieldwork and worked as a musician in a local band from 1995-1996. He has published several articles on this subject: “Modernity’s Trickster: ‘Dipping’ and ‘Throwing’ in Congolese Popular Dance Music” (forthcoming in Research in African Literatures, special issue on performance), and “Soukouss or Sell-Out? Congolese Popular Dance Music on the World Market,” in Commodities and Globalization: Anthropological Perspectives, Angelique Haugerud, M. Priscilla Stone, and Peter D. Little (eds.), forthcoming.

Christopher Breu is an Assistant Professor of English at Illinois State University, where he teaches courses in twentieth-century American literature, popular culture, and critical theory. He is currently completing work on a book manuscript entitled Hard-Boiled Masculinities: Fantasizing Gender in American Literature and Popular Culture, 1920-45. In addition, he has published on a diverse array of subjects including Maryse Cond�’s _I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem and contemporary techno and indie-rock. His current work on Frank Sinatra represents the beginning of a larger project on internal struggles over politics and culture in the United States and their relationship to the emergence of the U.S. as a global hegemon in the middle years of the twentieth century.

Winter 2001 Colloquium Series

Colloquium Series
In winter 2001, the Center for Cultural Studies will continue to host a Wednesday colloquium series, which features current cultural studies work by campus faculty and visitors. The sessions are informal, normally consisting of a 30-40 minute presentation followed by discussion. We gather at noon, with presentations beginning at 12:15. Participants are encouraged to bring their own lunches; the Center will provide coffee, tea, and cookies. 

 

ScheduleALL COLLOQUIA ARE IN THE OAKES MURAL ROOMJanuary 10
Earl Jackson
(Literature, UC Santa Cruz )
Toward a Post-Wave East Asian Cinema
 

January 17
Wlad Godzich
(Dean of Humanities, UC Santa Cruz)
Reconstructing the Subject 
 

January 27
Margaret Jolly
(Gender Relations Centre, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, Australian National University)
Looking Back? Gender, Race and Sexuality in Pacific Cinema 
 

January 31
Dana Frank
(American Studies, UC Santa Cruz)
GIRL STRIKERS OCCUPY CHAIN STORE, WIN BIG: the Detroit Woolworth’s Sit-Down Strike
 

February 7 
Ann Saetnan
(Sociology and Political Science, Norweigan University of Science and Technology)
Elicited Whispers, Broken Sound Barriers 
 

February 14
Rob Wilson
(Literature, UC Santa Cruz)
Global/local rumblings inside Empire: Gladiator and sublime spectacle
 

February 21
Marcial Gonzalez
(English, UC Berkeley )
Fredric Jameson’s Arrested Dialectic and the ‘Absent First Step of Renewed Praxis’
 

February 28
Alexandra Stern
(History, UC Santa Cruz)
Modern Racial Formations: Interrogating the History of Eugenics in California 
 

March 7
Renya Ramirez
(American Studies, UC Santa Cruz)
Sarah Morgan’s Government Story: A Redefinition of Culture, Community and Citizenship 
 

Participants

Earl Jackson is Associate Professor of Literature at UCSC. His research interests include new Asian cinema, science fiction, suspense, and genre fiction, gay male sexuality, digital media, and Japanese literature and poetics. He has published poetry, fiction, and many articles, and is involved in numerous web-based critical and literary activities. His books include Fantastic Living: The Speculative Autobiographies of Samuel Delany(forthcoming, Oxford) and Strategies of Deviance: Essays in Gay Male Representational Agency(Indiana, 1994). His web projects can be found at www.letsdeviant.com and www.anotherscene.com. Professor Jackson’s talk is from a current project on New Asian cinema.

Wlad Godzich is Dean of Humanities at UCSC, having recently arrived from the University of Geneva, where he was Professor of English and Chair of Emergent Literature. He is the author of numerous books and articles, including The Culture of Literacy(Harvard, 1994), Philosophie einer un-europ�ischen Literaturkritik(Philosophy of a Non-European Literary Criticism, Wilhelm Fink, 1988), and An Essay in Prosaics: The Emergence of Prose in the French Middle Ages(co-authored with Jeffrey Kittay, Minnesota, 1987). Dean Godzich’s current research interests include theories and modes of subjectivity, globalization and culture, and the field he founded: emergent literature.

Dana Frank is a Professor of American Studies at UCSC, where she teaches labor history, political economy, race, gender, and the cultural politics of class. She is the author of Buy American: The Untold Story of Economic Nationalism(Beacon Press, 1999), which was excerpted in the Washington Postand won the Book of the Year Award from the International Labor History Association. She is also the author of Purchasing Power: Consumer Organizing, Gender and the Seattle Labor Movement, 1919-1929(Cambridge, 1994), and reviews books regularly for The Nation. Her current project, on the Detroit Woolworth’s sit-down strike of 1937, is part of a forthcoming book with Robin D. G. Kelley and Howard Zinn, in which each author tells the story of a different strike.

Margaret Jolly is Professor and Head of the Gender Relations Project at the Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies at the Australian National University. She has been at ANU since 1989. One of the world’s distinguished scholars of Pacific Island anthropology and cultural studies, Professor Jolly has published a wide-ranging series of books and articles, including Women of the Place: Kastom, Colonialism and Gender in Vanuatu (1994). A recent manuscript, An Ocean of Difference: Colonialisms, Maternalisms, and Feminisms in the Pacific, is under review. While at the Center, Professor Jolly will pursue research on gender, indigeneity, and diaspora in the Pacific with a particular emphasis on cinema and the visual arts.

Ann Saetnan is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and Political Science at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim, Norway. Her research focuses on science and technology as they relate to gender and to work. Her co-edited volume, Localizing and Globalizing Reproductive Technologies,was just published by Ohio State University Press. While at the Center, Professor Saetnan will work on her new book project, provisionally titled Ultrasonic Discourse,a mapping of the debates surrounding the use of ultrasound in pregnancy in Norway.

Rob Wilson joins the UCSC faculty this quarter as Professor of Literature, after having been a faculty member at the University of Hawaii at Manoa since 1976. He is one of the world�s most prominent scholars of Hawaiian and Pacific literatures and cultural production, as well as of American literature and poetics. His books include Reimagining the American Pacific: From �South Pacific� to Bamboo Ridge and Beyond(Duke, 2000), American Sublime: The Genealogy of a Poetic Genre(Wisconsin, 1991), as well as the co-edited volumes Inside Out: Literature, Cultural Politics and Identity in the New Pacific(Rowman and Littlefield, 1999) and Global/Local: Cultural Production in the Transnational Imaginary.

Marcial Gonzalez received his Ph.D. in Modern Thought and Literature from Stanford University in 2000, and became an Assistant Professor in the English Department at UC Berkeley in the fall of 2000. He works on Chicana/o literary and cultural studies, and is currently working on a book manuscript titled Postmodernism, History and the Chicana/o Novel: Toward a Dialectical Literary Criticism,a study of several important Chicana/o novels published from 1970-1992, which includes an argument that the postmodern critique of history has limited the potential for Chicana/o studies to develop an effective social criticism. An earlier version of his talk this quarter won the Michael Sprinker Award for best dissertation chapter from the Marxist Literary Group of the MLA in June 2000.

Alexandra Stern is Assistant Professor of History at UCSC, having completed her Ph.D. in History at the University of Chicago in 1999. From 1999-2000 she was interim director of the Historical Center for Health Sciences at the University of Michigan. Her work is on the history of science and technology, specifically eugenics. Recent articles include “Buildings, Boundaries, and Blood: Medicalization and Nation-Building on the U.S.-Mexico Border, 1910-1930” (Hispanic American Historical Review, Feb. 1999) and “Responsible Mothers and Normal Children: Eugenics, Welfare, and Nationalism in Post-Revolutionary Mexico, 1900-1940” (Journal of Historical Sociology,Fall 1999). Her talk is from a book in progress on eugenics and the U.S.-Mexican borderland.

Renya Ramirez is Assistant Professor of American Studies. She received her Ph.D. from the School of Education at Stanford University in 1999, and her Masters degree in Anthropology from Stanford in 1998. She has published several articles and given many papers on contemporary Native American issues, several of which draw on her fieldwork, which explored Native American healing practices and community formation in San Jose, California. Among the articles is “Healing Through Grief: Urban Indians Re-imagining Culture and Community in San Jose, California” (Journal of American Indian Culture and Research,1999). Her work is part of an attempt to establish new frameworks for the study of urban Indians.

Spring 2000 Colloquium Series

Colloquium Series

In Spring 2000, the Center for Cultural Studies will continue to host a Wednesday colloquium series, which features current cultural studies work by campus faculty and visitors. The sessions are informal, normally consisting of a 30-40 minute presentation followed by discussion. We gather at noon, with presentations beginning at 12:15. Participants are encouraged to bring their own lunches; the Center will provide coffee and tea.

 

ScheduleApril 12 OAKES MURAL ROOM
Jonathan Hunt
(English, Santa Clara University)
The Ominous Bicycle

April 19 OAKES MURAL ROOM
Ulla Haselstein
(American Literature, University of Munich)
‘To give one’s self’: The ethics of the gift in Harriet Jacobs’Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl

April 26 OAKES MURAL ROOM
Shu-mei Shih
(Comparative Literature, East Asian Languages and Cultures, and Asian American Studies, UCLA)
The End of Nostalgia and the Problem of National Allegory

May 3 OAKES MURAL ROOM
David Anthony
(History, UC Santa Cruz)
African Americans and South Africans: Narratives of A Jouney

May 10 OAKES MURAL ROOM
Pheng Cheah
(Rhetoric, UC Berkeley)
Chinese Cosmopolitanism in Two Senses and Postcolonial National Memory

May 17 OAKES MUAL ROOM
Hugh Raffles
(Anthropology, UC Santa Cruz)
The Dreamlife of Ecology

May 24 OAKES MURAL ROOM
Melissa Orlie
(Political Science, Criticism & Interpretive Theory, and Women’s Studies, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign)
Political Capitalism, the Desire for Freedom,and the Consumption of Politics

 

Presenters

Jonathan Hunt is Lecturer in the Department of English at Santa Clara University and an associate editor of College English. His dissertation, Naturalist Democracy (UC Santa Cruz Department of Literature, 1996) examines 19th-century French and U.S. literary naturalism’s participation in and resistance to the political and cultural project of producing the democratic citizen. He writes, “This talk, which might be considered an exercise in critical bicycle historiography, is part of a new project on obsolescence and nostalgia, and has its roots in literary naturalism’s anxious fixation on the mechanical technologies of the steam age. These technologies, particularly the railroad, both demonstrated the racial and cultural superiority of the economic core and ominously figured the eclipse of the human subject in a relentless determinism. The bicycle, widely popularized in the 1880s and 1890s, is a uniquely human-powered product of the industrial era, and thus becomes the site of a particular set of cybernetic anxieties. This project examines the wobbly path of these anxieties through the bicycle’s twentieth-century trajectory of obsolescence.” 

Ulla Haselstein is Professor of American Literature at the University of Munich, where she directs the graduate program in gender studies and the America Institute. She is the author of the 1991 book Entziffernde Hermeneutik: Studien zum Begriff der Lekture in der psychoanalytischen Theorie des Unbewubten (Deciphering Hermeneutics: Studies in the Concept of Reading in Psychoanalytic Theories of the Unconscious) and the forthcoming Die Gabe der Zivilisation: Interkultureller Austausch und literarische Textpraxis in Amerika, 1661-1861 (The Gift of Civilization: Intercultural Exchange and Literary Textual Practice in America, 1661-1861). Her many articles range across topics such as contemporary U.S. fiction, Derridean theory, psychoanalysis, and feminist literary theory. Her talk concerns the circulations of the female body as gift in the economics of slavery, of love and of textuality. 

Shu-mei Shih is Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature, East Asian Languages and Cultures, and Asian American Studies at UCLA. Her book, The Lure of the Modern: Writing Modernism in Semicolonial China, 1917-1937, is forthcoming from the University of California Press this year. Shih’s current project is entitled “Visuality and Identity: Cultural Transactions Across the Chinese Pacific.” Her research interests include Chinese literary modernism in local/global circulation, the politics of transnationality in art and cinema from Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Asian America, and third world feminisms. Her talk looks at post- 1997 Hong Kong cinema and art as ironic commentaries on the nostalgic search for cultural identity and the national allegory paradigm of third world cultural production.

David Anthony is Associate Professor of History at UCSC and Provost of Oakes College. His research interests encompass the history of Africa and the African diaspora. He has written on the urban history of Dares Salaam, and is currently at work on Pan African Enigma: The Life and Times of Max Yergan, 1892-1975, which explores the life of an activist whose venues spanned South Africa and the United States, and whose politics ranged from communism to extreme conservatism. Because it will be the first full-length published biography on this controversial subject, the Yergan work has spawned ancillary discoveries which may help point the way to new vistas in research on Africa’s diaspora. In his colloquium talk, Anthony will discuss his ongoing research with Professor Robert Edgar, a historian at Howard University, chronicling the relationship between African Americans and South Africans from the late eighteenth century, when African American sailors began venturing to South Africa, to 1965. Anthony and Edgar are preparing a multivolume collage of primary documents, including diaries, private papers, travelers’ accounts, autobiographies, speeches, songs and hymns, government documents, missionary journals, magazines, newspapers, books, and interviews from the United States, Europe, and South Africa. 

Pheng Cheah is Assistant Professor of Rhetoric at UC Berkeley. He is co-editor of Cosmopolitics: Thinking and Feeling Beyond the Nation (Minnesota, 1998) and Thinking Through the Body of the Law(Allen and Unwin and New York University Press, 1996), and author of “Universal Areas: Asian Studies in a World in Motion,” Traces, Vol. 1, no. 1 (forthcoming, Fall 2000). He is currently working on a book entitled Spectral Nationality, which looks at the philosopheme of culture as freedom in modern philosophy, primarily in the work of Kant, Fichte, Hegel and Marx, and the vicissitudes of this philosopheme in decolonizing nationalism and contemporary postcoloniality. His talk, on the Chinese diaspora in Southeast Asia, is from a second book in progress on global financialization and the inhuman.

Hugh Raffles is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at UCSC. His research concerns questions of locality and region-making, exploring the links between some highly material “local” practices of place-making in the eastern Amazon, and the role of traveling naturalists in the generation of Euro-American imaginaries of Amazonia since the 16th century. His book On the Nature of the Amazon is forthcoming from Princeton University Press. Raffles’s colloquium talk offers a preliminary account of fieldwork among ecological researchers on the devastated mahogany “frontier” of southeastern Amazonia. He writes, “My concern is to detail the simultaneously historical, intertextual, intersubjective, and political-economic exigencies through which this particular scientific work materializes Amazonia in discourse and in place. Scientists working in the midst of such knotted social relations display sophisticated understandings of both constraints and opportunities as they struggle to salvage dreams of conservation from the excess of transregional realpolitik.”

Melissa Orlie is Associate Professor of Political Science, Criticism & Interpretive Theory, and Women’s Studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Her research explores sources of normativity and ethical motivation from a perspective that is political rather than epistemological, driven by issues of meaning and inspiration rather than justification and prescription. She is the author of Living Ethically, Acting Politically (Cornell, 1997). Her current work focuses upon the evaluative aspirations and distinctions ineluctably at work in our everyday conduct, what she describes as our capacity to imagine and accept responsibility for something beyond what we already know or have achieved. She is currently at work on a book entitled Suffering Humanity: Aspiration and Joy after Nietzsche & Freud. Her colloquium talk uses Michel Foucault’s analytic of ethics to reconsider commodity consumption as the dominant practice of the self in the regime of political capitalism. 

Winter 2000 Colloquium Series

Colloquium Series

In Winter 2000, the Center for Cultural Studies will continue to host a Wednesday colloquium series, which features current cultural studies work by campus faculty and visitors. The sessions are informal, normally consisting of a 30-40 minute presentation followed by discussion. We gather at noon, with presentations beginning at 12:15. Participants are encouraged to bring their own lunches; the Center will provide coffee and tea.

 

ScheduleJanuary 12 OAKES MURAL ROOM
Manuela Ribeiro Sanches
(German Studies, University of Lisbon)
Color of Skin, Shape of the Body: “Race” Difference and the Nature of “Man” in 18th-Century Germany

January 19 COWELL PROVOST HOUSE
Peter Euben (Politics, UCSC)
The Polis, Globalization and the Politics of Place

January 26 OAKES MURAL ROOM
Helene Moglen (Literature, UCSC)
The Trauma of Gender: Psychosexuality and the Bimodal Novel 

February 2 COWELL PROVOST HOUSE
Barry D. Adam
(Sociology, University of Windsor)
Globalization/Mobilization: Gay and Lesbian Movements

February 9 OAKES MURAL ROOM
Amelie Hastie
(Film and Digital Media, UCSC)
The Cam�ra Stylo: Intermedial Authorship and Film History

February 16 OAKES MURAL ROOM
Susan Gillman (Literature, UCSC)
The Occult History of Du Bois

February 23 OAKES MURAL ROOM
Dana Takagi (Sociology, UCSC)
Native Nationalisms and Incommensurability; or, Why We Would Rather Not Talk About God

March 1 COWELL PROVOST HOUSE
Kerwin Klein (History, UC Berkeley)
The Culture Concept and Historical Discourse, or What Was the New Cultural History? 

 

Presenters

Manuela Ribeiro Sanches is Assistant Professor in the Department of German Studies at the University of Lisbon, Portugal. She has published extensively on Georg Forster, a naturalist who participated in Cook’s second voyage and who was to die in exile in Paris in 1794. This talk, part of her work in progress in German anthropology in the 18th century, reflects on the debates about “race” and difference that opposed Forster to Immanuel Kant, a major figure in German anthropology. She places this debate in the contexts of European colonialism, the abolitionist movement, and the appeal to universal human rights, as well as the French Revolution and the way it affected an emergent German anthropology. How were questions of difference approached and interpreted by an academic discourse apparently removed from the colonial centers? How was difference perceived, narrated, classified? How was “race” represented and constructed? How did it relate to cultural difference? And how are these issues to be read from a postcolonial perspective?

Helene Moglen is Professor of Literature at UC Santa Cruz. She has published extensively on the English novel- including books on Laurence Sterne and Charlotte Bronte- and has written on issues relevant to feminist theory, psycho-analysis and education. In her forthcoming book, The Trauma of Gender: A Feminist Theory of the English Novel, she offers an innovative theory of the novel’s form and function. Her book seeks to move beyond long-dominant accounts that have focused almost exclusively on the realist tradition of the novel and the class interests which that tradition serves. Instead, she insists that the modern novel has been essentially bimodal, and that its bimodaliity has functioned to manage the strains and contradictions of the sex-gender system. Further, she suggests that the principal theoretical models through which the novel has been studied are themselves structured by competing narrative modes: the same modes that have shaped the novel and exposed its ambivalent attitudes about sexuality and gender. In her paper, she will set out the theoretical argument of her book, and will ask others to join her in considering its applicability to diverse national literatures, from the 18th through the 20th centuries, and to other disciplinary discourses.

Peter Euben is Professor of Politics at UC Santa Cruz. He is the author of The Tragedy of Political Theory: The Road Not Taken (1990), Corrupting Youth: Political Education and Democratic Culture (1997) and the forthcoming Platonic Noise: Essays on the Modernity of Classical Political Thought (2000). He also co-edited Athenian Democratic Thought and the Reconstitution of American Democracy. His current work focuses on the necessity of utopia and the idea of ironic politics. His colloquium talk asks whether there is an illuminating analogy to be drawn between the experience of political dislocation and the theoretical struggles to understand it that accompanied the eclipse of the classical polis, and our experience of globalization and attempts to understand it theoretically. It explores two oppositions: that between the classical polis and the moral critique leveled at it by Cynics and Stoics, and between neo-Stoic cosmopolitanism of Martha Nussbaum and political critics of her moral universalism.

Barry D. Adam is Professor of Sociology at the University of Windsor. He is author or co-editor of The Survival of DominationThe Rise of a Gay and Lesbian MovementExperiencing HIV, and The Global Emergence of Gay and Lesbian Politics, as well as articles on new social movement theory, neighborhood mobilization in Sandinista Nicaragua, HIV transmission, and gay and lesbian studies. A central theme of his work is the subjectivity of inferiorized peoples, that is, the ways in which people build identity, community, and a sense of efficacy in highly adverse social conditions. This talk seeks to sort through the thickets of globalization discourse to better understand how social movements develop on a transnational basis. Using gay and lesbian movements as an example, the talk will address ways in which globalizing forces articulate with movement formation.

Amelie Hastie is Assistant Professor of Film and Digital Media at UC Santa Cruz. An assistant editor of Camera Obscura, she is the author of “Fashion, Femininity, and Historical Design: The Visual Texture of Three Hong Kong Films” Post Script (Fall 1999), and “A Fabricated Space: Assimilating the Individual on Star Trek: The Next Generation” in the edited volume Enterprise Zones: Liminal Positions on Star Trek. Her work in progress “examines the role of writing in the construction of cinematic histories, theories, and even images, especially as such writings point toward the multiple roles women have played as ‘authors’ within the production of films and the production of our knowledge about them.” She reconnects the visual and written forms through an exploration of writings by three primary figures who worked in the silent film industry and later took up writing in an attempt to secure their places in film history: early film director Alice Guy-Blach� and silent film stars Louise Brooks and Colleen Moore. Hastie considers how each woman is configured in a complex intertextual system of narrative films, documentaries, their own writings and writings about them, and other diverse objects they have collected and/or produced.

Susan Gillman, Professor of Literature at UC Santa Cruz, has long been interested in how popular genres give voice to racial and national affinities and conflicts. Her previous work on Mark Twain, including Dark Twins: Imposture and Identity in Mark Twain’s America (Chicago, 1989) and an essay collection, co-edited with Forrest Robinson, Mark Twain’s Pudd’nhead Wilson: Race, Conflict, and Culture (Duke, 1990), focuses on Twain’s uses of the discourses of detective and fantasy fiction (legal, scientific, medical, psychological) in his ongoing exploration of race as a “fiction of law and custom.” The point of departure for her new book, American Race Melodramas, 1877-1915, is a pattern of derogatory references to a wide variety of late 19th-century race writing as “melodramatic.” American race melodrama was a malleable cultural mode that cut across periods, genres and ideologies. Responding to the historically specific situation of post-Reconstruction U.S. nationalism and global internationalism, when the discipline of American history was both politicized and popularized, late 19th-century race melodramas emerge as an explicitly historiographic mode. Gillman’s talk explores W. E. B. Du Bois’s philosophy of history as a project combining his lifelong engagements with science and mysticism, providing Du Bois with a bridge between objectivity and activism, politics and poetry, as well as a means of uncovering the mystical history of race consciousness itself.

Dana Takagi is Associate Professor of Sociology at UC Santa Cruz. Her research interests center on Asian Americans, rights discourses of minority and indigenous peoples, and contemporary nationalism in the age of globalization. She is author of The Retreat from Race: Asian American Admissions and Racial Politics (1993), which won the Gustavus-Myer Center for Human Rights Outstanding Book Award and the National Book Award of the Association of Asian American Studies. She also co-edits the UC Press book series “American Crossroads.” Her most recent article is “Forget Postcolonialism: Self Determination and Sovereignty in Hawaii” (Colorlines, Winter 1999). This talk is drawn from her research on Hawaiian nationalism(s), multiculturalism and various kinds of “rights” discourses in the Pacific, and the expression of nationalist precepts in the odd venues of popular culture, especially card games and collectibles such as Magic and Poke �mon. Professor Takagi�s presentation is also offered as part of the Sociology Department�s colloquium series.

Kerwin Klein is Assistant Professor of History at UC Berkeley. He is the author of Frontiers of Historical Imagination: Narrating the European Conquest of Native America, 1890-1990(University of California, 1997) and “The Emergence of ‘Memory’ in Historical Discourse,” (Representations, forthcoming). Klein is a member of the editorial boards of Representations and the Pacific Historical Review. He is at work on two books: Frontier Tales, which explores the relationship between decolonization and philosophy of history in the Americas, and Charles Manson and the Meaning of History, an account of California and philosophy of history in pop culture.

Fall 1999 Colloquium Series

Colloquium Series

In Fall 1999, the Center for Cultural Studies will continue to host a Wednesday colloquium series, which features current cultural studies work by campus faculty and visitors. The sessions are informal, normally consisting of a 30-40 minute presentation followed by discussion. We gather at noon, with presentations beginning at 12:15. Participants are encouraged to bring their own lunches; the Center will provide coffee and tea.

 

ScheduleOctober 6 OAKES MURAL ROOM
Richard Terdiman (Literature, UC Santa Cruz)
Enlightenment Representation and the Critique of Postmodernity

October 13 SILVERMAN LOUNGE
Anthony Chennells (English, University of Zimbabwe)
Early Rhodesian Women Novelists and White Rhodesian Nationalism

October 20 OAKES MURAL ROOM
Lisa Rofel (Anthropology, UC Santa Cruz)
Qualities of Desire: Imagining Gay Identities in China

October 27 SILVERMAN LOUNGE
Carla Freccero (Literature, UC Santa Cruz)
Queer Encounters: Early Modern France and the New World

November 3 OAKES MURAL ROOM
Cristina Lucia Ruotolo (Humanities, San Francisco State University)
Music, Audience, and Femininity in Turn-of-the-Century America

November 10 SILVERMAN LOUNGE
Lionel Cantu (Sociology, UC Santa Cruz)
Queer Diasporas: U.S. Immigration and the Political Economy of Sexual Identity

November 17 OAKES MURAL ROOM
Christopher Nealon (English, UC Berkeley)
The Ambivalence of Lesbian Pulp Fiction

 

Participants

Richard Terdiman is Professor of Literature at UCSC. His work is primarily in French literature and history, and he is the author of several books that deal with representation, the social formation and reception of theory, and the role of memory in culture, including Discourse/ Counter-Discourse: The Theory and Practice of Symbolic Resistance in Nineteenth-Century France (1985) and Present Past: Modernity and the Memory Crisis (1993). His talk is drawn from a book in progress that deals with Enlightenment pre-occupations with some of the theoretical choices also prominent in poststructuralism. It might be thought of as something like “Diderot Reads Derrida.” In addition to his current work on the Enlightenment and postmodernity, he is also completing a book on social time.

Anthony Chennells is Associate Professor of English at the University of Zimbabwe. He has published extensively on South African and Zimbabwean literature, history and culture. His co-authored Expanding Perspectives on Dambudzo Marechera appeared last year. During Southern Rhodesia’s ninety-year history, settlers produced over three hundred novels, most of which were published in London. Professor Chennells, whose family settled in Rhodesia more than a hundred years ago, has studied this body of writing to trace how it contributed to the myth of a discrete Rhodesian identity which was neither British nor South African, leading to Ian Smith’s declaration of Rhodesian independence in 1965 and to the liberation war from which Zimbabwe was born in 1980. Several scholars are now beginning to re-examine the women novelists in this group to see how they were implicated in the Rhodesian imperial and nationalist projects. This paper is a contribution to that discussion..

Lisa Rofel is Associate Professor of Anthropology at UC Santa Cruz. Her book Other Modernities: Gendered Yearnings in China After Socialism was published this spring by UC Press. This study of three generations of Chinese women silk workers proposes a cross-cultural approach to modernity that “treats it as a located cultural imaginary, arising from and perpetuating relations of difference across an East-West divide.” Rofel argues that “other modernities” are neither exclusively local nor variations on a universal model. Rather, “[t]hey are forced cross-cultural translations of various projects of science and management called modernity.” Rofel is also co-editor of Engendering China: Women, Culture, and the State (Harvard, 1994). Her talk is part of a current project on transnational culture, cosmopolitanism, and gender and sexuality in contemporary China.

Carla Freccero is Professor in the Literature Department at UC Santa Cruz, and specializes in early modern cultural studies, feminist and queer theory, and U.S. popular culture. Her first book, a study of Rabelais, is entitled Father Figures (Cornell 1991). She is co-editor, with Louise Fradenburg, of Premodern Sexualities(Routledge 1996), and most recently the author of Popular Culture: An Introduction (NYU 1999). Her talk is part of a book-length project on 16th-century French writings about South America and the Tupinamba Indians. This talk focuses on Jean de Lery’s History of a Voyage to the Land of Brazil, an account of a Protestant preacher’s exile among the Tupi in the 1550s near the bay of Rio. Claude Levi-Strauss called de Lery’s book the first modern ethnography. Using rhetorical and psychoanalytic methods of discourse analysis, the talk explores a configuration of European homoerotic ideological fantasies surrounding the ‘New World’ man.

Cristina Lucia Ruotolo is Assistant Professor of Humanities at San Francisco State University. She completed her Ph.D. in English at Yale University, and her Master’s in Violin Performance at the New England Conservatory of Music. She has been a violinist in the San Jose Symphony and the Marin Symphony orchestras. Professor Ruotolo’s talk is from a book in progress that explores the dramatic changes in American music cultures beginning in the 1890s from the perspective of their impact on and presence in literature, particularly works by Willa Cather, Kate Chopin, James Weldon Johnson and Theodore Dreiser. She writes, “With the development of a centralized music publishing industry (“Tin Pan Alley”), of African American influence on both popular and classical music, and of a strong female presence in public audiences and on the stage, music began to have„ and to be perceived as having„a powerful role in shaping its audience’s sense of self and place. At issue in debates, and for these four writers, is the nature and extent of that power. Does music merely arouse emotions and states of being that already exist within the listening self? Or does music have the capacity to enter into and change a listener’s way of being„to, for example, infuse a young white man with not only black sounds but blackness itself? Or to lead a young middle-class woman into prostitution? In my talk I will bring such questions to bear on Willa Cather’s Song of the Lark and Kate Chopin’s The Awakening.”

Lionel Cantu is a new Assistant Professor of Sociology at UCSC, and has received a post-doctoral fellowship at UC Davis for 1999-2000 to work with anthropologist Roger Rouse on the linkages between global capitalism, sexual commodification, migration, and sexual identities. A Ph.D. in Social Science from UC Irvine, Cantu’s work centers on the intersections of Chicano/ Latino studies, gay and lesbian studies, social movements, globalization, and immigration. His dissertation, “Border Crossings: Mexican Men and the Sexuality of Migration,” is representative of that project. His publications include the forthcoming article “Entre Hombres/Between Men: Latino Masculinities and Homosexualities, and other studies of Latina/o literary and cultural production.

Christopher Nealon is Assistant Professor in the English Department at UC Berkeley, having received his Ph.D. from Cornell two years ago. He works on U.S. lesbian and gay literary and cultural studies, and is also a published poet. His first book, Foundlings: Lesbian and Gay Historical Invention Before Stonewall, is forthcoming from Duke, and his articles include “The Modernity of Queer Studies” and “Affect-Genealogy: Feeling and Affiliation in Willa Cather.” Nealon’s talk centers on Ann Bannon’s lesbian pulp novels of the 1950s and 1960s and the ambiguous reception of those novels. Nealon reads the problematics of Bannon’s model of lesbian bodies as gender-inverted to suggest that the novels offer contemporary readers a signal example of how to produce a livable relationship between historical possibilities and historical limits.

Spring 1999 Colloquium Series

Colloquium Series

In Spring 1999, the Center for Cultural Studies will continue to host a Wednesday colloquium series, which features current cultural studies work by campus faculty and visitors. The sessions are informal, normally consisting of a 30-40 minute presentation followed by discussion. We gather at noon, with presentations beginning at 12:15. Participants are encouraged to bring their own lunches; the Center will provide coffee and tea.

 

ScheduleApril 14 OAKES MURAL ROOM
Curtis Marez (American Studies, UC Santa Cruz)
Signifying Spain, Becoming Comanche: Indian Warfare and the Genealogies of Chicana/o Studies

April 21 COWELL CONFERENCE ROOM
Neil Brenner (Sociology, New York University)
Late Neoliberalism: Urban Governance, Uneven Development and the Politics of Scale in the European Union

April 28 OAKES MURAL ROOM
Margaret Morse (Film and Video, UC Santa Cruz)
Breathing Space

October 27 COWELL CONFERENCE ROOM
Lisa Parks (Film Studies, UC Santa Barbara)
To the Edge of Time: Satellite Vantage Points and the Cosmic Zoom

May 12 OAKES MURAL ROOM
Ruth Gilmore (Geography and Women’s Studies, Rutgers University)
Fatal Festivals: Race, Gender, and Power in Corcoran

May 19 COWELL CONFERENCE ROOM
Jody Greene (Literature, UC Santa Cruz)
Revenge of the Straw Woman

May 26 OAKES MURAL ROOM
Louis Chude-Sokei (Literature, UC Santa Cruz)
The Landscape of A Zone Shared Elsewhere: Harlem and the Caribbean Imagination

 

Participants

Curtis Marez is Professor of Literature at UCSC. His work is primarily in French literature and history, and he is the author of several books that deal with representation, the social formation and reception of theory, and the role of memory in culture, including Discourse/ Counter-Discourse: The Theory and Practice of Symbolic Resistance in Nineteenth-Century France (1985) and Present Past: Modernity and the Memory Crisis (1993). His talk is drawn from a book in progress that deals with Enlightenment pre-occupations with some of the theoretical choices also prominent in poststructuralism. It might be thought of as something like “Diderot Reads Derrida.” In addition to his current work on the Enlightenment and postmodernity, he is also completing a book on social time.

Neil Brenner is Associate Professor of English at the University of Zimbabwe. He has published extensively on South African and Zimbabwean literature, history and culture. His co-authored Expanding Perspectives on Dambudzo Marechera appeared last year. During Southern Rhodesia’s ninety-year history, settlers produced over three hundred novels, most of which were published in London. Professor Chennells, whose family settled in Rhodesia more than a hundred years ago, has studied this body of writing to trace how it contributed to the myth of a discrete Rhodesian identity which was neither British nor South African, leading to Ian Smith’s declaration of Rhodesian independence in 1965 and to the liberation war from which Zimbabwe was born in 1980. Several scholars are now beginning to re-examine the women novelists in this group to see how they were implicated in the Rhodesian imperial and nationalist projects. This paper is a contribution to that discussion..

Margaret Rose is Associate Professor of Anthropology at UC Santa Cruz. Her book Other Modernities: Gendered Yearnings in China After Socialism was published this spring by UC Press. This study of three generations of Chinese women silk workers proposes a cross-cultural approach to modernity that “treats it as a located cultural imaginary, arising from and perpetuating relations of difference across an East-West divide.” Rofel argues that “other modernities” are neither exclusively local nor variations on a universal model. Rather, “[t]hey are forced cross-cultural translations of various projects of science and management called modernity.” Rofel is also co-editor of Engendering China: Women, Culture, and the State (Harvard, 1994). Her talk is part of a current project on transnational culture, cosmopolitanism, and gender and sexuality in contemporary China.

Lisa Parks is Professor in the Literature Department at UC Santa Cruz, and specializes in early modern cultural studies, feminist and queer theory, and U.S. popular culture. Her first book, a study of Rabelais, is entitled Father Figures (Cornell 1991). She is co-editor, with Louise Fradenburg, of Premodern Sexualities(Routledge 1996), and most recently the author of Popular Culture: An Introduction (NYU 1999). Her talk is part of a book-length project on 16th-century French writings about South America and the Tupinamba Indians. This talk focuses on Jean de Lery’s History of a Voyage to the Land of Brazil, an account of a Protestant preacher’s exile among the Tupi in the 1550s near the bay of Rio. Claude Levi-Strauss called de Lery’s book the first modern ethnography. Using rhetorical and psychoanalytic methods of discourse analysis, the talk explores a configuration of European homoerotic ideological fantasies surrounding the ‘New World’ man.

Ruth Gilmore is Assistant Professor of Humanities at San Francisco State University. She completed her Ph.D. in English at Yale University, and her Master’s in Violin Performance at the New England Conservatory of Music. She has been a violinist in the San Jose Symphony and the Marin Symphony orchestras. Professor Ruotolo’s talk is from a book in progress that explores the dramatic changes in American music cultures beginning in the 1890s from the perspective of their impact on and presence in literature, particularly works by Willa Cather, Kate Chopin, James Weldon Johnson and Theodore Dreiser. She writes, “With the development of a centralized music publishing industry (“Tin Pan Alley”), of African American influence on both popular and classical music, and of a strong female presence in public audiences and on the stage, music began to have„ and to be perceived as having„a powerful role in shaping its audience’s sense of self and place. At issue in debates, and for these four writers, is the nature and extent of that power. Does music merely arouse emotions and states of being that already exist within the listening self? Or does music have the capacity to enter into and change a listener’s way of being„to, for example, infuse a young white man with not only black sounds but blackness itself? Or to lead a young middle-class woman into prostitution? In my talk I will bring such questions to bear on Willa Cather’s Song of the Lark and Kate Chopin’s The Awakening.”

Jody Greene is a new Assistant Professor of Sociology at UCSC, and has received a post-doctoral fellowship at UC Davis for 1999-2000 to work with anthropologist Roger Rouse on the linkages between global capitalism, sexual commodification, migration, and sexual identities. A Ph.D. in Social Science from UC Irvine, Cantu’s work centers on the intersections of Chicano/ Latino studies, gay and lesbian studies, social movements, globalization, and immigration. His dissertation, “Border Crossings: Mexican Men and the Sexuality of Migration,” is representative of that project. His publications include the forthcoming article “Entre Hombres/Between Men: Latino Masculinities and Homosexualities, and other studies of Latina/o literary and cultural production.

Luis Chude-Sokei is Assistant Professor in the English Department at UC Berkeley, having received his Ph.D. from Cornell two years ago. He works on U.S. lesbian and gay literary and cultural studies, and is also a published poet. His first book, Foundlings: Lesbian and Gay Historical Invention Before Stonewall, is forthcoming from Duke, and his articles include “The Modernity of Queer Studies” and “Affect-Genealogy: Feeling and Affiliation in Willa Cather.” Nealon’s talk centers on Ann Bannon’s lesbian pulp novels of the 1950s and 1960s and the ambiguous reception of those novels. Nealon reads the problematics of Bannon’s model of lesbian bodies as gender-inverted to suggest that the novels offer contemporary readers a signal example of how to produce a livable relationship between historical possibilities and historical limits.

Winter 1999 Colloquium Series

Colloquium Series

In Winter 1999, the Center for Cultural Studies will continue to host a Wednesday colloquium series, which features current cultural studies work by campus faculty and visitors. The sessions are informal, normally consisting of a 30-40 minute presentation followed by discussion. We gather at noon, with presentations beginning at 12:15. Participants are encouraged to bring their own lunches; the Center will provide coffee and tea.

 

ScheduleJanuary 13 OAKES MURAL ROOM
Elisabetta Villari (Ancient Greek History, University of Genoa)
On Some Motifs in Walter Benjamin

January 20 SILVERMAN LOUNGE
Catherine Soussloff (Art History, UC Santa Cruz)
After Aesthetics: Visual Representation, Jewish Identity, and Cultural Studies

January 27 OAKES MURAL ROOM
David Turnbill (Comparative Studies in Art, Science and Religion, Deakin University, Australia)
Travelling, Mapping, and narrating: Aboriginal, Maori, Pacific Islander and Western Ways of Knowledge and Place-making

February 3 SILVERMAN LOUNGE
Sandria Freitag (Executive Director, American Historical Association)
Acts of Seeing: Mass-Produced Visual Images in the Creation of Modern India

February 10 OAKES MURAL ROOM
Laurence Rickels (Germanic, Slavic and Semitic Studies, UC Santa Barbara)
Resistance in Theory

February 17 SILVERMAN LOUNGE
Manu Goswami (Politics, UC Santa Cruz)
Rethinking Modularity: Beyond Objectivist and Subjectivist Approaches to Nationalism

February 24 OAKES MURAL ROOM
Emily Honig (Women’s Studies, UC Santa Cruz)
Sexing the Cultural Revolution

 

March 3 SILVERMAN LOUNGE
Samantha Frost (Women’s Studies, UC Santa Cruz)
Faking It: Madness, Morals, and Hobbe;s “Thinking Bodies”

 

Participants

Elisabetta Villari is a Researcher in Ancient Greek History at the University of Genoa. She is also a visitor at the Center for the Winter Quarter. Her research encompasses two areas: the biography in Greek antiquity, and modern classical historiography and philosophy of history, with an emphasis on Walter Benjamin. She has recently published a book in Italian on Benjamin�s encounter with the late nineteenth-century German historian and philosopher Johan Jakob Bachofen, known for his theory of matriarchy. During her time at UCSC, Professor Villari will work on several ongoing research projects on Benjamin, among them an intellectual biography of his exile years in Paris.

Catherine Soussloff has taught Art History at UCSC since 1987. She presently holds the Patricia and Rowland Rebele Chair in Art History. Her book, The Absolute Artist: The Historiography of a Concept was published by University of Minnesota Press in 1987. Her edited volume, Jewish Identity in Modern Art History,, will be published by UC Press early in 1999. Two of her essays, “The Concept of the Artist” and “Historicism in Art History” were recently published in the Encyclopedia of Aesthetics (Oxford, 1998). Her work in progress includes a book on Jewish identity and aesthetics, essays on performativity and the historicized body in European visual representation, and a historiography of media discourse.

David Turnbill is Associate Professor of Anthropology at UC Santa Cruz. Her book Other Modernities: Gendered Yearnings in China After Socialism was published this spring by UC Press. This study of three generations of Chinese women silk workers proposes a cross-cultural approach to modernity that “treats it as a located cultural imaginary, arising from and perpetuating relations of difference across an East-West divide.” Rofel argues that “other modernities” are neither exclusively local nor variations on a universal model. Rather, “[t]hey are forced cross-cultural translations of various projects of science and management called modernity.” Rofel is also co-editor of Engendering China: Women, Culture, and the State (Harvard, 1994). Her talk is part of a current project on transnational culture, cosmopolitanism, and gender and sexuality in contemporary China.

Sandria Freitag is Executive Director of the American Historical Association and a historian of South Asia (see page 1). Freitag writes that her current work is “a theorized approach to the creation and dissemination of new visual mass media reflecting on community and national identity in South Asia, 1870-1970. The time period and technological context of the project crosses the divide between British colonial India and the independent state, and so tells us much about how a colonized area becomes ‘modern,’ particularly in the intersection of global and local visual practices and constructions of meaning.”

Laurence Rickels teaches in the Departments of Art, Comparative Literature, Germanic, Slavic, and Semitic Studies, and Film Studies at UC Santa Barbara and works as a psychotherapist at the Westside Neighborhood Medical Clinic in Santa Barbara. He is the author of Aberrations of Mourning, (1988), Der unbetra-uerbare Tod (1990), The Case of California (1991), and The Nazi Psychoanalysis Chronicles, which will be appearing in three installments with the University of Minnesota Press: 1) Only Psychoanalysis Won the World Wars; 2) Crypto Fetishism,; 3) Psy Fi. The Chronicles complete the series on Unmourningwhich began with Aberrations of Mourning and continued with The Case of California. Rickels�s current theoretical work addresses resistance to the transferential setting within theoretical bodies of work (Benjamin and DeMan) and/or receptions of Freud (M. Klein, M. Graf, and Otto Gross).

Manu Goswami received her Ph.D. in 1998 from the University of Chicago Department of Political Science. Her dissertation, entitled “The Production of ‘India’: Colonialism, Nationalism and Territorial Nativism, 1870-1948,” integrates recent developments in studies of nationalism, the political economy of globalization, and socio-spatial theory to rethink the complex dynamic between colonial modernity and anti-colonial nationalism. Professor Goswami has a forthcoming article in Comparative Studies in Society and History (vol. 40, 4, 1998) which analyzes the nationalization and naturalization of conceptions of economy and territory in late nineteenth-century colonial India from a comparative historical and global perspective. Her talk is drawn from a work-in-progress which frames contemporary debates about nationalism through the optic of recent calls to mediate the canonical opposition between objectivity and subjectivity. It attempts to propose an alternative perspective on nationalism through a critical reconstruction of Benedict Anderson�s theory of modular nationalism.

Emily Honig is Professor of Women�s Studies and History at UC Santa Cruz. A historian of China, she is the author of Sisters and Strangers: Women in the Shanghai Cotton Mills (1986), Creating Chinese Ethnicity (1992), and Personal Voices: Chinese Women in the 1980�s (coauthored, 1988). Her current research focuses on gender and sexuality during the Chinese Cultural Revolution (1966-76).

Samantha Frost recently received her Ph.D. from Rutgers University, and is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Women�s Studies department at UC Santa Cruz. A political theorist with special interests in modern, contemporary, and feminist political theory, as well as histories/theories of the body, she is currently working on a project that uses Thomas Hobbes and his iconographic status within political theory to explore how bodies shape the contexts within which we make political judgments.

Fall 1998 Colloquium Series

Colloquium Series

In fall 1998, the Center for Cultural Studies will continue to host a Wednesday colloquium series, which features current cultural studies work by campus faculty and visitors. The sessions are informal, normally consisting of a 30-40 minute presentation followed by discussion. We gather at noon, with presentations beginning at 12:15. Participants are encouraged to bring their own lunches; the Center will provide coffee, tea, and cookies. 

 

ScheduleOctober 14
Alice Yang Murray
(History, UC Santa Cruz )
From Relocation Center to Concentration Camp: Historianc and Reinterpretations of Internment
Cowell Provost House

October 21
Shirley Samuels
(English and American Studies, Women’s Studies, Cornell University)
Whitman and the Face of the Nation 
Oakes Mural Room

October 28
Noriko Aso
(History, UC Santa Cruz)
The “New Japan” on Display: Nationalism, Internationalism, and Commerce in Postwar Art Exhibits 
Cowell Conference Room

November 4
Yvette Huginnie
(American Studies, UC Santa Cruz)
Towards a Multi-Referent Understanding of Race
Oakes Mural Room

November 11 
Stephen Best
(English, UC Berkeley)
The Fugitive’s Properties 
Cowell Conference Room

November 18
Victor Burgin
(History of Consciousness, UC Santa Cruz)
Jenni’s Room

December 2
Jonathan Beller
(Cultural Studies, UC Santa Cruz)
Visual Culture and Philippine Modernity
Oakes Mural Room

 

Participants

Alice Yang Murray is Assistant Professor of History at UCSC. Her work explores constructions of historical memory: how they reflect and facilitate political, social, and cultural change. Her book-in-progress, Better Americans in a Greater America: Japanese American Internment, Redress, and Historical Memory, 1942-1998, analyzes how changing representations of internment history by government officials, scholars, and activists affected the Japanese American redress movement. Her other published work explores how Asian American organizations have addressed issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality; the advantages and disadvantages of using oral history sources; and the challenge to traditional views of “feminist” agency and consciousness posed by the history of Korean immigrant women in America.

Shirley Samuels is Professor of English and American Studies and Director of the Women�s Studies Program at Cornell University. She is the author of Romances of the Republic: Women, the Family, and Violence in the Literature of the Early American Nation(Oxford University Press, 1996) and editor of The Culture of Sentiment: Race, Gender, and Sentimentality in Nineteenth-Century America(Oxford University Press, 1992). Her time at the Center will be devoted to another book project, National Gender: American Iconography and the Civil War, in which Samuels will “explore the charged emphasis on gender and the use of both men and women to highlight political iconography in the sensation fiction and historical novels written about the Civil War, and …address how gender appears in the political cartoons and broadsides that were used to promote or attack slavery.”
Noriko Aso is Visiting Assistant Professor of History at UCSC; she has also taught at Portland State University and Ohio State University. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1997, with a dissertation entitled New Illusions: The Emergence of a Discourse on Traditional Japanese Arts and Crafts, 1868-1945. Her talk will focus on the importance accorded refashioning Japan as a bunka kokka (cultural nation) in the postwar period, exploring the strategies deployed in representing a Japanese aesthetic heritage in three cases: early postwar department store exhibits, an exhibit commemorating the signing of the 1951 San Francisco Peace Treaty, and the 1964 Tokyo Olympics arts festival.

Yvette Huginnie is an Assist-ant Professor in American Studies at UCSC, where she teaches courses on the U.S. West, U.S. Labor History, and Race and Ethnicity in the U.S.. Her current research project is a book manuscript, tentatively titled Mexicans in a White Man�s Town, , which explores the intersections of racial categorization, class formation, and imperialism in the late nineteenth- and early twentieth-centuries.

Stephen Best is an Assistant Professor in the Department of English at the University of California-Berkeley, where he teaches classes in American and African-American Literature, as well as Film Studies. His talk is drawn from a book-in-progress which explores genealogies of possession in the law, with a particular emphasis on the late nineteenth-century debate surrounding mechanical reproduction and intellectual property�a debate marred by the dual fears of dubious fiduciary motive (i.e., theft, trespass, piracy, plagiary, usurpation), and the law�s grudging return to the problem of the injurious commodification of persons and personhood. Professor Best contends that, as these debates surrounding technology and property unfold, the law animates subterranean affiliations, both rhetorical and logical, between purloined intellectual properties (stolen voices, stolen images) and the expropriated and unremunerated labor and personhood (that is, the property) of slavery�an exchange and commodification rationalized by means of legal algorithms of the fugitive slave (as indebted, obligated, culpable, responsible). Professor Best�s talk will map the correspondences between Harriet Beecher Stowe�s novel Uncle Tom�s Cabin, and later film versions of the same, paying particular attention to issues of translation and adaptation when novel and film appear in the text of intellectual property law; appearances which often entail the rescripting of Uncle Tom as fugitive slave.

Victor Burgin is Professor of History of Consciousness at UCSC. His books include In/Different Spaces: Place and Memory in Visual Culture (University of California, 1997), Some Cities (University of California and Reaktion Books, 1996), and The End of Art Theory: Criticism and Postmodernity(MacMillan, 1986). About his talk on “Jenni�s Room” he writes, “Shortly before her twenty-first birthday Jennifer Ringley attached a video camera to her computer and began to upload images of her college dormitory room to the Internet. Since then, at any time of day or night, anyone who logs onto her �JenniCam� web site may look into Jenni�s room. Interviews with Ringley and articles about her have tended to treat her as an exhibitionist. Everyday language has taken the word �exhibitionist� from psychiatry and psychoanalysis. In this talk I draw upon psychoanalytic theory to suggest other ways of thinking about Jenni�s room.”

Jonathan Beller was awarded a J. Paul Getty Postdoctoral Fellow in Art History and the Humanities for his research project Visual Transformations and Philippine Modernity. He is the author of PMLA in the Philippines?(1998), Capital/Cinema, in Deleuze and Guattari: New Mappings in Politics/Philoso-phy/Culture (1998), and The Spectatorship of the Proletariat (1995). Beller writes that “this work is concerned with the qualitative changes in visuality wrought by culture and technology accompanying and enabling economic �development.� The Philippines is a particularly interesting scene of visual encounter given its status as an American colony: subject to U.S. media of all types, yet producing its own counter-visions. And finally, the case for the inclusion of Philippine painting among the art that counts as art history is a matter of aesthetics. The Filipino artists in whom I am interested exhibit as profound an accommodation to and analysis of the shifting conditions of visuality which they helped to bring into being as any of the Western innovators, despite the fact that their creativity has been radically under-mediated.”