Events of Interest for the Week of January 20, 2020

Tuesday, January 21, 2020
UCSC Center for Racial Justice
Refugee Returns
Hồng-Ân Trương, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
4:30 PM – 6:30 PM
Humanities 1, Room 210

Wednesday, January 22, 2020
Science & Justice Research Center and Institute for Social Transformation
Racial Reconciliation & the Future of Race in America
Alondra Nelson, Social Sciences Research Council
7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Kuumbwa Jazz Center, 320 Cedar St

Thursday, January 23, 2020
The Humanities Institute and the Center for Creative Ecologies
Beyond the End of the World Public Lectures
Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Music Recital Hall

To include your event in the “Of Interest” section of our email, fill out this form by noon on the Friday before your event.

January 17, 2019 — Ralina Joseph, “Postracial Resistance: Black Women, Media, and the Uses of Strategic Ambiguity”

Flyer for Ralina Joseph's talk, "Postracial Resistance"

January 17, 2019, 1:30-3:30 pm, Humanities 1 Room 210

Postracial Resistance: Black Women, Media, and the Uses of Strategic Ambiguity. How African American women celebrities, cultural products, and audiences subversively used the tools of postracial discourse — the media-propagated notion that race and race-based discrimination are over — in order to resist its very tenets.

April 5, 2017 – Matthew Fuller, “In Praise of Plasticity”

Plasticity, in neurology, is the ability to adapt, change, grow and find new forms at multiple scalar levels whilst retaining, rerouting or developing function. Professor Fuller examines the notion of plasticity as it is articulated by cybernetics, machine learning, and anarchism.

Matthew Fuller is Professor of Cultural Studies and Director of the Centre for Cultural Studies at Goldsmiths, University of London.

Date/Time

April 5, 2017 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue
Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

January 18, 2017 – Susan Buck-Morss, “History as Translation”

Susan Buck-Morss’s current project, Year 1, dives into recent research on the first century in order to topple various conceptual givens that have shaped modernity as an episteme (and led us into some unhelpful post-modern impasses), and argues there is no way forward without retracing our steps and charting another course (while discovering surprising fellow-travellers along the way).

Susan Buck-Morss is Distinguished Professor of Political Science at the CUNY Graduate Center and Professor Emerita of Government at Cornell University.

Date/Time

January 18, 2017 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue
Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

January 25, 2017 – Emily Mitchell-Eaton, “What’s Free About ‘Freely Associated Statehood’? Preserving Colonial Legacies in the Marshall Islands”

Emily Mitchell-Eaton’s work explores imperial citizenship forms and statecraft in the U.S. Pacific territories. Her research follows territorial migration policies from their enactment in the islands to the new sites of diaspora where imperial migrants resettle, exposing new racial formations, modes of (un)belonging, and immigrant solidarities.

Mitchell-Eaton is a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Non-citizenship, LALS/Chicano Latino Research Center at UCSC.

Date/Time

January 25, 2017 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue
Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

February 1, 2017 – Regina Kunzel, “In Treatment: Psychiatry and the Archives of Modern Sexuality”

Regina Kunzel’s current project explores the encounter of sexual- and gender-variant people with psychiatry in the mid-twentieth-century U.S. Drawing on multiple archives, she argues for the importance of psychiatric scrutiny, stigma, and medicalization in the making of modern sexuality.

Kunzel is Professor of History and Gender and Sexuality Studies, as well as the Director of the Program in Gender and Sexuality Studies at Princeton University.

Date/Time

February 1, 2017 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue
Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

February 2, 2017 – Christopher Newfield, “After The Great Mistake”

>Newfield’s (Professor of literature and American studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara) new book, “The Great Mistake,“ shows how privatization has weakened the educational quality and the budgetary stability of public universities and wrecked their true public mission. But how can they recover during an administration that promises to accelerate privatization in every arena? Newfield argues that universities should use this period to rebuild their public purpose from the ground up, with special attention to the non-college voters that allegedly turned the election towards Donald J. Trump.

Co-Sponsored by the Center for Cultural Studies and the Santa Cruz Faculty Association.

Christopher Newfield is Professor of English at UC Santa Barbara.

Date/Time

February 2, 2017 | 5:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue
Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz=

February 8, 2017 – Camilo Gomez-Rivas, “The Ransom Industry and the Expectation of Refuge on the Medieval Western Mediterranean Muslim-Christian Frontier”

Camilo Gomez-Rivas’s current project Refugees of the Reconquista is a history of social responses to displaced populations across the Muslim-Christian frontier over the long territorial decline of al-Andalus. Proceeding from a set of historical questions, the project is based on readings of multiple sources, including Arabic, Castilian, and Catalan legal, historiographical, and literary sources.

Gomez-Rivas is an Assistant Professor of Literature, UCSC, and an Alexander von Humboldt Fellow.

Date/Time

February 8, 2017 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue
Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

February 15, 2017 – Gary Wilder, “Black Radicalism/Radical Humanism: W.E.B. Du Bois’s Cooperative Commonwealth”

Gary Wilder is the author of Freedom Time: Negritude, Decolonization, and the Future of the World (2015) and The French Imperial Nation-State: Negritude and Colonial Humanism Between the World Wars (2005). He is currently co-editing the volume The Postcolonial Contemporary and working on a book entitled “Cooperative Commonwealth: Radical Humanism and Black Atlantic Criticism.”

Wilder is Professor of Anthropology, History, and French, as well as the Director of the Committee on Globalization and Social Change, at the CUNY Graduate Center.

Date/Time

February 15, 2017 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue
Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz

February 22, 2017 – Rick Prelinger, “Silence, Cacophony, Crosstalk: Archival Talking Points”

Rick Prelinger’s currently researches the political economy and aesthetics of archives. He produces live urban history film events made for participatory audiences and is in the early stages of a film counterposing the lived experience of citydwellers as shown in home movies with the pronouncements of urban theorists and historians.

Prelinger is an Associate Professor of Film and Digital Media at UCSC, as well as Founder of the Prelinger Archives and a board member at the Internet Archive.

Date/Time

February 22, 2017 | 12:00 PM
Free and open to the public

Venue
Humanities Building 1, Room 210
University of California, Santa Cruz