Of Interest Events for the Week of March 9, 2015

 

Monday, March 9 / FILM + DIGITAL MEDIA VISITING ARTIST SERIES / Caroline Martel / “Wavemakers” / 7:00pm / Communications 150 (Studio C)

Wednesday, March 11 / EDUCATION DEPARTMENT / Funie Hsu / “The Coloniality of the English-Only Movement: Race, Language, and Power” / 12:00-1:45pm / McHenry 0266 (Ground Floor)

Thursday, March 12 / SIKH AND PUNJABI STUDIES / Baagi & Hoodini / Sikh Rappers & Social Justice / 6:00-7:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

Friday, March 13 / FRIDAY FORUM FOR GRADUATE RESEARCH / Jessica Calvanico / “Collections of Subjections” / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

Saturday, March 14 / SHAKESPEARE WORKSHOP / “Shakespeare and Music” / 1:00-4:30pm / Digital Arts Research Center (DARC) Dark Lab, Room 108

 

* To advertise your unit or department’s event in the “Of Interest” section of this weekly bulletin, please e-mail complete event information in text format (no PDFs) to cult@ucsc.edu no later than noon on Friday of the prior week.

* Additional information and regular updates on many “Of Interest” events can be found on the IHR website.


 

OF-INTEREST EVENT DESCRIPTIONS:

Monday, March 9 / FILM + DIGITAL MEDIA VISITING ARTIST SERIES / Caroline Martel / “Wavemakers” / 7:00pm / Communications 150 (Studio C)

Caroline Martel has been synthesizing documentary theory and practice for over a decade, with a special interest in archives, invisible histories, and audio/visual technologies and heritage. Martel is an award-winning documentary filmmaker, artist and researcher whose work has been presented to critical acclaim internationally in diverse venues such as at the Toronto International Film Festival, the International Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam (IDFA), on SRC, NHK, and SVT, at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and at the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris. Her first feature documentary, The Phantom of the Operator, showed in more than fifty international festivals, and was reviewed by Variety as “… an enormously imaginative documentary … an hour of nonstop visual and intellectual stimulation.” Martel was one of the featured guests at the 57th Robert Flaherty Seminar. Her first gallery show, the montage installation Industry/Cinema, was presented at the Museum of the Moving Image in New York in 2012.

Integrating vérité, never-before-seen archival material, and an entrancing soundtrack, Wavemakers (2012, 97 min.) explores the origins and workings of the ondes Martenot, an electronic instrument of such extraordinary sensitivity that nearly a century after its invention, musicians, artisans, and scientists are still trying to unravel its secrets. A modern-day story set against a historical background, Wavemakers is a journey into the very heart of the mystery of music.

Free and Open to the Public
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Wednesday, March 11 / EDUCATION DEPARTMENT / Funie Hsu / “The Coloniality of the English-Only Movement: Race, Language, and Power” / 12:00-1:45pm / McHenry 0266 (Ground Floor)

This talk situates the English-Only movement within the theoretical framework of coloniality, to demonstrate not only the colonial legacies of English-Only, as Donaldo Macedo (2000) has argued, but to also illuminate how dimensions of colonial power persist beyond the official time and spaces of formal colonial administration and shape contemporary language instruction discourse. Drawing from a combination of memos from colonial administrators, reports of the War Department, educational reports, political cartoons and other primary sources, this talk pays special attention to the historical cases of settler and overseas colonialism as enacted through English instruction policies directed for Native American, Filipino, and Puerto Rican populations. It concludes with a discussion of the implications of coloniality and the English-Only movement and highlights the need for anti-colonial and liberatory English instruction practices.

Funie Hsu, Ph.D. is a University of California President’s Postdoctoral Fellow at the UC Davis School of Education. She received her Ph.D. from the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Education in Policy Organization Measurement and Evaluation with a Designated Emphasis in Women, Gender and Sexuality.
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Thursday, March 12 / SIKH AND PUNJABI STUDIES / Baagi & Hoodini / Sikh Rappers & Social Justice / 6:00-7:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

Sikh hip-hop artists Baagi and Hoodini will explore facets of the immigrant and minority experience in multicultural America, in an evening of music, poetry and collective discussion.

Baagi—“Babbey nu Kanna, Gaggay nu Bihari.” In spelling the word “Baagi,” the celebration of a rebellious Punjabi heritage is reborn. Baagi is one of the few artists to rap exclusively in Panjabi. Born and raised in Bombay until moving to Los Angeles in his early teens, Baagi brings a unique perspective both to Hip-Hop and to the evolution of Punjabi culture. A childhood passion for composing Punjabi poetry coupled with his love for Hip-Hop eventually turned an after-school hobby into a career of expression. This artist uses Farsi, Hindi and Panjabi vocabulary to add a new voice to the musical conglomerate. Baagi uses his platform to paint pictures of social issues, easygoing personal anecdotes, and day-to-day experiences, as seen through the lens of a young man influenced by the intersections of many worlds. His debut album, titled Baagi Di Vaari, is available for free download at http://beabaagi.bandcamp.com. You can follow him on Twitter @BaagiMedia.

Hoodini—Hoodini, also known as Hoodeez the Hindoo, has been hailed as “one of the most lyrical and charismatic emcees of South Asian descent” by critics. The poet and Hip-Hop artist combines witty wordplay, lyrical agility, and keen storytelling to present a novel narrative to his audience with natural ease. In listening to a Hoodini record, you may easily find yourself migrating from a commentary on issues of race relations to a jaunty reminiscence of a past love interest, often within the same verse. Hoodeez has released four studio albums to date and has shared the stage with notable Hip-Hop artists including Blu, Pacific Division, Skeme, and RZA of the Wu-Tang Clan. You can keep up with his latest works at http://HoodiniDidIt.com and on Twitter @HoodiniDidIt.
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Friday, March 13 / FRIDAY FORUM FOR GRADUATE RESEARCH / Jessica Calvanico / “Collections of Subjections” / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

Jessica Calvanico is a first year doctoral student in Feminist Studies. She is interested in critical prison studies, performance, ethnography, homosociality and visual culture. Her current work looks at corporeal subjection and the politics of collecting, owning and viewing these forms of subjection. She is also working on an ongoing performance project entitled AVALON, exploring utopia and homosocial space.

The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:00 to 1:30PM and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. Light refreshments will be available.

For more info, or to inquire about joining the roster of presenters for Spring quarter contact: fridayforum.ucsc@gmail.com
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Saturday, March 14 / SHAKESPEARE WORKSHOP / “Shakespeare and Music” / 1:00-4:30pm / Digital Arts Research Center (DARC) Dark Lab, Room 108

Shakespeare is famous for his speeches, but the London theaters where his plays took place were also filled with music. “Shakespeare and Music” is a symposium exploring the popular music of Renaissance England, the practice of vocal and instrumental music in Shakespeare’s plays, and Shakespeare’s meditation on music as a metaphor for his art and its effects. Featuring a keynote address by Ross Duffin, The Fynette H. Kulas Professor of Music at Case Western University and author of Shakespeare’s Songbook (W.W. Norton 2004). Free and open to the public.

Panelists:
Ross Duffin: “Reconstructing Shakespeare’s Songbook”
Samuel Arkin: “Shakespeare’s Music and Shylock’s Ears”
Ariane Helou: “Shakespeare’s Singers”

The symposium is held in conjunction with “Treasures from the Age of Shakespeare”, a performance of the Baltimore Consort for the Santa Cruz Baroque Festival at 7:30pm in the UCSC Music Recital Hall (Tickets: scbaroque.org/tickets).
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Of Interest Events for the Week of March 2, 2015

 

Tuesday, March 3 / SIKH AND PUNJABI STUDIES / Johanna Ogden / “Mutiny in Oregon: Early Twentieth Century East Indian Radicals and the Birth of the Ghadar Party” / 4:00-5:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

Wednesday, March 4 / FILM + DIGITAL MEDIA WEDNESDAY NIGHT CINEMA / “The Creators of Shopping Worlds” / 7:00pm / Studio C (Communications 150)

Wednesday, March 4 / DIRECTIONS IN DIGITAL HUMANITIES / Antonella Guidazzoli / “Open Virtual Heritage Applications: From Research Tools to Emotional and Participatory Virtual Spaces” / 5:00-7:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

Thursday, March 5 / PHILOSOPHY IN A MULTICULTURAL CONTEXT / Fabrizzio McManus Guerrero/ “From Queer Theory to Teoría Cuir: Latin American appropriations of Gay Identities” / 12:00-1:45pm / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

Thursday, March 5 / LIVING WRITERS SERIES / Maceo Montoya / 6:00-7:45pm / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

Friday, March 6 / FRIDAY FORUM FOR GRADUATE RESEARCH / Michael Wilson / “Violent Constructions: Classifying, Explaining, and Misrepresenting Contentious Politics” / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

Friday and Saturday, March 6-7 / CRITICAL RACE AND ETHNIC STUDIES / “From Ferguson to Salinas: Intersections Against State-Sanctioned Violence”

 

* To advertise your unit or department’s event in the “Of Interest” section of this weekly bulletin, please e-mail complete event information in text format (no PDFs) to cult@ucsc.edu no later than noon on Friday of the prior week.

* Additional information and regular updates on many “Of Interest” events can be found on the IHR website.
 


 

OF-INTEREST EVENT DESCRIPTIONS:

Tuesday, March 3 / SIKH AND PUNJABI STUDIES / Johanna Ogden / “Mutiny in Oregon: Early Twentieth Century East Indian Radicals and the Birth of the Ghadar Party” / 4:00-5:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

The Hindustani Association of the Pacific Coast, better known as the Ghadar Party, was a game-changing development in Indian history. Ghadarites called for and attempted the overthrow of British colonial rule in India during WWI, seeking a caste-free, secular and independent Indian nation. Ghadar was overwhelmingly initiated by and composed of Sikh laborers from the North American West and became a worldwide movement drawn from people of all castes and religions. San Francisco was home to the movement’s public office and its weekly newspaper, Ghadar, and has often been logged as the movement’s birthplace, especially by historians of the North American West. But remote Astoria, Oregon holds this distinction. Drawing on Indian historical accounts, oral histories and Oregon archival materials, Ms. Ogden both repopulates the East Indian community in Oregon and traces reasons for and key moments in Ghadar’s seemingly unlikely genesis there. Her larger interest, however, is exploring the dis-remembering of East Indians in Oregon and the window it provides into the targeting of Arabs, Muslims and South Asians in post-9/11 America.

Johanna Ogden is an independent historian and activist from Oregon. In 2013 she initiated and was the consulting historian for Astoria’s two-day Ghadar Party Centenary Commemoration and in 2014 participated in an international conference on Ghadar in Chandigarh, Punjab. Her most recent publications include the award-winning “Ghadar, Historical Silences & Notions of Belonging” Oregon Historical Quarterly, Summer 2012; “Ghadar’s Oregon Roots,” The Ghadar Movement: Background, Ideology, Action and Legacies (Punjabi Uni: 2013). She is presently writing a book about Ghadar’s roots in Oregon for the University of Washington Press.
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Wednesday, March 4 / FILM + DIGITAL MEDIA WEDNESDAY NIGHT CINEMA / “The Creators of Shopping Worlds” / 7:00pm / Studio C (Communications 150)

THE CREATORS OF SHOPPING WORLDS (2001, 72 min.)

Brave new shopping worlds are being created. What have mall owners, architects, surveillance technicians, and supermarket workers done to turn human subjects into pure streams of consumers, into the perfect inhabitants of shopping mall paradise?

“…Going to the supermarket is an exercise in predestination: research has proven, as we learn in The Creators of Shopping Worlds, that, “Customers orient themselves horizontally… and vertically they look for a specific item.” The mall planners and bread-display architects seen at work in Harun Farocki’s doc take on the sinister air of a worldwide conspiracy.” –Jessica Winter, Village Voice, October 31st, 2001
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Wednesday, March 4 / DIRECTIONS IN DIGITAL HUMANITIES / Antonella Guidazzoli / “Open Virtual Heritage Applications: From Research Tools to Emotional and Participatory Virtual Spaces” / 5:00-7:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

Antonella Guidazzoli, CINECA Supercomputer Center, Bologna Italy, leads research services for the 3D Virtual Information Research Lab at Italy’s supercomputer center in Bologna, CINECA, a non-profit consortium comprising 69 Italian universities, two national research centers, and the Ministry of Universities and Research. She has done distinguished work in the creation of virtual cultural heritage sites, including a 3D project on the Etruscans that includes an educational video featuring the Etruscan character, Ati: http://www.glietruschielaldila.it

Contact digitalhumanities@ucsc.edu for more details about any of the above events.
Follow @DH_UCSC on Twitter and Digital Humanities at UCSC on Facebook.
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Thursday, March 5 / PHILOSOPHY IN A MULTICULTURAL CONTEXT / Fabrizzio McManus Guerrero/ “From Queer Theory to Teoría Cuir: Latin American appropriations of Gay Identities” / 12:00-1:45pm / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

Fabrizzio McManus Guerrero studied Biology in the Faculty of Sciences at UNAM from 2000 to 2004 and wrote, as his undergraduate thesis, a taxonomic revision of the genus Jatropha (fam. Euphorbiaceae). From 2004 to 2006 he was a masters student in the Program in Philosophy of Science also at UNAM. There he wrote his master thesis focusing on the philosophical problems of phylogenetic reconstruction. His masters thesis won two prizes: the Norman Sverdlin prize for best philosophy thesis in 2006, and the UNAM prize medal “Alfonso Caso.”He started his doctorate in the same program in 2006. In his dissertation, he analyzed homosexuality in the context of philosophical accounts of mechanistic explanation and biopower. He successfully defended (with honors) his dissertation in November 2010: La homosexualidad a la luz de la filosofía de la ciencia: Mecanismos biologicos, subjetividad y poder (Homosexuality in Light of the Philosophy of Science: Biological Mechanisms, Subjectivity, and Power).

Fabrizzio is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Interdisciplinary Studies at UNAM.
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Thursday, March 5 / LIVING WRITERS SERIES / Maceo Montoya / 6:00-7:45pm / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

Maceo Montoya grew up in Elmira, California. He graduated from Yale University in 2002 and received his Master of Fine Arts in painting from Columbia University in 2006. His paintings, drawings, and prints have been featured in exhibitions and publications throughout the country as well as internationally. Montoya’s first novel, The Scoundrel and the Optimist (Bilingual Review, 2010), was awarded the 2011 International Latino Book Award for “Best First Book” and Latino Stories named him one of its “Top Ten New Latino Writers to Watch.” In 2014, University of New Mexico Press published his second novel, The Deportation of Wopper Barraza, and Copilot Press published Letters to the Poet from His Brother, a hybrid book combining images, prose poems, and essays.

Montoya is an assistant professor in the Chicana/o Studies Department at UC Davis where he teaches the Chicana/o Mural Workshop and courses in Chicano Literature. He is also affiliated with Taller Arte del Nuevo Amanecer (TANA), a community-based arts organization located in Woodland, CA.
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Friday, March 6 / FRIDAY FORUM FOR GRADUATE RESEARCH / Michael Wilson / “Violent Constructions: Classifying, Explaining, and Misrepresenting Contentious Politics” / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202
Michael S. Wilson is a Ph.D. student in the Politics Department with an emphasis in Social Documentary. A Mexico City native, he is broadly interested in issues of peace and conflict in Latin America, and his dissertation project is a comparison of social movements emerging against resource extraction in Brazil, Chile, and Peru. In this talk, Michael will explore how three sources of knowledge and information—media, statistics, and qualitative studies—tend to (mis)represent contentious politics.

The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:00 to 1:30PM and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. Light refreshments will be available.

For more info, or to inquire about joining the roster of presenters for Spring quarter contact: fridayforum.ucsc@gmail.com
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Friday and Saturday, March 6-7 / CRITICAL RACE AND ETHNIC STUDIES / “From Ferguson to Salinas: Intersections Against State-Sanctioned Violence”

March 6, 5:00-8:00 pm / Oakes Learning Center, UCSC
Resisting State Violence in California: Police Brutality and the Prison Industrial Complex

March 7, 10:00am-4:00pm / Resource Center for Nonviolence, 612 Ocean St, Santa Cruz, CA 95060
Ofrenda y altares Workshop, 10-11:30 am
Poetic Imaginaries Against Violence, 12-1:30 pm
Anti-Colonial Walking Tour, 2-5:00 pm

As folks across the country demand justice for Mike Brown and Eric Garner, community members in Salinas, CA are fighting the police murders of Angel Ruiz, 42 (d. March 20, 2014); Osman Hernandez, 26 (d May 9, 2014); Carlos Mejia-Gomez, 44 (d. May 20, 2014); Frank Alvarado, Jr., 39 (d. July 10, 2014); and Jaime Garcia, 35 (d. October 31, 2014). “From Ferguson to Salinas: Intersections Against State-Sanctioned Violence” brings together community members, political organizers, scholars, and artists/poets from across California to discuss the ongoing historical crisis of state-sanctioned violence against people of color and the movement to oppose white supremacist policing in the U.S. We hope to build upon the momentum we’ve witnessed over the last six months as people have taken to the streets to demand justice and offer visions of a world in which black and brown lives matter. We seek an analysis of the historical relationship between anti-black and anti-brown violence in the U.S. in the hopes of strengthening cross-racial solidarities. We seek to raise awareness about the intersections between racialization and economic violence, between police brutality and mass incarceration, and between intimate and state-based gender violence. We are interested in building connections between those who are grieving the loss of their loved ones, those who fight to stay alive despite the injustices of the U.S. justice system, and those who mobilize poetic imaginaries to build the world anew.

For more details see the IHR website.
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Of Interest Events for the Week of February 23, 2015

 

Monday & Tuesday, Feb 23-24 / UC PRESIDENTIAL CHAIR IN FEMINIST CRITICAL RACE & ETHNIC STUDIES / Film Screenings: “Anita: Speaking Truth to Power” / Various Times & Locations (See below)

Wednesday, Feb 25 / FILM + DIGITAL MEDIA WEDNESDAY NIGHT CINEMA / “The Interview” & “A New Product” / 7:00pm / Studio C (Communications 150)

Thursday, Feb 26 / FILM + DIGITAL MEDIA DEPARTMENT / Thomas Poell / “How are Facebook and Twitter Entangled in Activist Communication?” / 10:00-11:45am / Oakes, Room 105

Thursday, Feb 26 / ITALIAN STUDIES PROGRAM / Dacia Maraini / A Dramatic Reading of Dacia Maraini’s Play “Norma ’44” / 4:00-5:30pm / Cowell Provost House

Thursday, Feb 26 / UC PRESIDENTIAL CHAIR IN FEMINIST CRITICAL RACE & ETHNIC STUDIES / Anita Hill / “Speaking Truth to Power: Gender & Racial Equality 1991-2015” / 5:30-7:30pm / College 9/10 Multipurpose Room

Friday, Feb 27 / FRIDAY FORUM FOR GRADUATE RESEARCH / Tracy Perkins / “From Protest to Policy: The Political Evolution of California Environmental Justice Activism, 1980s-2010s” / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

Friday, Feb 27 / ITALIAN STUDIES PROGRAM / Dacia Maraini / “An Evening with Italian Writer: Dacia Maraini” / 5:15-7:00pm / Cowell, Room 131

 

* To advertise your unit or department’s event in the “Of Interest” section of this weekly bulletin, please e-mail complete event information in text format (no PDFs) to cult@ucsc.edu no later than noon on Friday of the prior week.

* Additional information and regular updates on many “Of Interest” events can be found on the IHR website.
 


 


Monday & Tuesday, Feb 23-24 / UC PRESIDENTIAL CHAIR IN FEMINIST CRITICAL RACE & ETHNIC STUDIES / Film Screenings: “Anita: Speaking Truth to Power”

Two separate film screenings. Monday’s screening is at the Nickelodeon Theater from 7:00-8:30pm. The cost is $10.50. Tuesday’s screening is on campus in the Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206 from 7:30-9:00pm. It is free.

Against a backdrop of sex, politics, and race, ANITA reveals the intimate story of a woman who spoke truth to power. Directed by Academy Award®-winning filmmaker Freida Mock, the film is both a celebration of Anita Hill’s legacy and a rare glimpse into her private life with friends and family, many of whom were by her side that fateful day 22 years ago. Anita Hill courageously speaks openly and intimately for the first time about her experiences that led her to testify before the Senate and the obstacles she faced in simply telling the truth. She also candidly discusses what happened to her life and work in the 22 years since.
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Wednesday, Feb 25 / FILM + DIGITAL MEDIA WEDNESDAY NIGHT CINEMA / “The Interview” & “A New Product” / 7:00pm / Studio C (Communications 150)

THE INTERVIEW (1997, 58 min.)

“In the summer of 1996 we filmed application training courses in which one learns how to apply for a job. School drop outs, university graduates, people who have to be retrained, the long-term unemployed, recovered drug addicts and mid-term managers – all of them are supposed to learn how to how to market and sell themselves, a skill to which the term “self-management” is applied. It was Kafka who likened being accepted for a job to entering the Kingdom of Heaven; the paths leading to both of them are completely uncertain. Today one speaks of getting a job with the greatest obsequiousness, but without any grand expectations.” — Harun Farocki

A NEW PRODUCT (2012, 36 min.

Scenes from meetings within a company which advises corporations how to design their offices — and the work done there. The film shows that words are not just tools, they have become an object of speculation.
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Thursday, Feb 26 / FILM + DIGITAL MEDIA DEPARTMENT / Thomas Poell / “How are Facebook and Twitter Entangled in Activist Communication?” / 10:00-11:45am / Oakes, Room 105

Over the past years, social media, such as Facebook and Twitter, have become vital elements in activist networks that connect local and national protests to global communication flows. These social media-enabled connections are, however, by no means smooth and unproblematic. In this lecture, Thomas Poell, Assistant Professor of Media Studies at the University of Amsterdam, will discuss some of the key complicating issues. First, the discussion will focus on language, or rather the multiplicity of languages used in global activist communication. Subsequently, the focus will shift to the social media platforms themselves. Far from constituting neutral communication platforms, these media very much shape the character of activist mobilization and communication. Finally, the lecture will highlight the role played by national states. A number of authoritarian states, most prominently China and Iran, have made far-reaching efforts to control online communication flows by filtering ‘harmful’ content, and by promoting national social platforms.
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Thursday, Feb 26 / ITALIAN STUDIES PROGRAM / Dacia Maraini / A Dramatic Reading of Dacia Maraini’s Play “Norma ’44” / 4:00-5:30pm / Cowell Provost House

Adapted for the stage from the translation by Monica Streifer and Lucia Re
Directed by Kimberly Jannarone (UCSC Theater Arts)

Set in an unnamed concentration camp in 1944 Germany, Norma ’44 tells the story of the perverse bond that grows between two female prisoners and the SS officer who coerces them into a performance of Bellini and Romani’s bel canto opera, Norma. The play explores dynamics of power, women’s solidarity, and art’s capacity to mediate, resist, and revise experience.

Author Dacia Maraini will be present for discussion with the audience.
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Thursday, Feb 26 / UC PRESIDENTIAL CHAIR IN FEMINIST CRITICAL RACE & ETHNIC STUDIES / Anita Hill / “Speaking Truth to Power: Gender & Racial Equality 1991-2015” / 5:30-7:30pm / College 9/10 Multipurpose Room

In 1991, Judge Clarence Thomas’ Senate Confirmation hearing sparked nation-wide conversations regarding gender representation, sexual harassment, and race. Anita Hill testified about Thomas’ inappropriate sexual behavior in the workplace when he served as Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights in the Department of Education and Chair of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Her testimony before a television audience of 22 million put the issues of sexual harassment on the national agenda. In her lecture, she will explore the impact of the hearing, including the legal developments, and related issues of credibility, consent, agency, and the interplay of culture, race, class, gender, and sexuality.

After the talk Anita Hill will be signing copies of her book, “Reimagining Equality: Stories of Gender, Race, and Finding a Home” (book signing hosted by Bookshop Santa Cruz).

There will be live simulcast in the Humanities Lecture Hall as an overflow venue.
Live radio broadcast on KZSC 88.1FM and www.kzsc.org.
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Friday, Feb 27 / FRIDAY FORUM FOR GRADUATE RESEARCH / Tracy Perkins / “From Protest to Policy: The Political Evolution of California Environmental Justice Activism, 1980s-2010s” / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:00 to 1:30PM and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. Light refreshments will be available.

For more info, or to inquire about joining the roster of presenters for Spring quarter contact: fridayforum.ucsc@gmail.com
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Friday, Feb 27 / ITALIAN STUDIES PROGRAM / Dacia Maraini / “An Evening with Italian Writer: Dacia Maraini” / 5:15-7:00pm / Cowell, Room 131

Preceded by Screening of 2013 Irish Braschi’s documentary film IO SONO NATA VIAGGIANDO: I was born travelling: A travel in Dacia Maraini’s memories.

Dacia Maraini is an influential writer, social critic and iconic figure in Italian contemporary literature and culture. She is the author of numerous novels, plays, short story and poetry collections including La lunga vita di Marianna Ucria, 1990, The Silent Duchess, and her latest work Chiara d’Assisi, Elogio della Disobbedienza, 2013, Chiara of Assisi, in Praise of Disobedience.
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Of Interest Events for the Week of February 16, 2015

 

Wednesday & Thursday, Feb 18-19 / CENTER FOR JEWISH STUDIES / “Liminal Spaces and the Jewish Imagination Conference” / Humanities 1, Room 210

Wednesday, Feb 18 / HISTORY DEPARTMENT / Manu Bhagavan /“Toward Universal Relief and Rehabilitation: India, UNRRA, and the New Internationalism” / 2:00-4:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 520

Wednesday, Feb 18 / VISUAL AND MEDIA CULTURES COLLOQUIA / Karen Barad / “Histories of Now: ‘Time Diffractions, Virtuality, and Material Imaginings’” / 4:00-6:00pm / Porter College, Room D245

Wednesday, Feb 18 / FILM + DIGITAL MEDIA WEDNESDAY NIGHT CINEMA / “Videograms of a Revolution” / 7:00pm / Studio C (Communications 150)

Thursday, Feb 19 / LIVING WRITERS SERIES / John Jota Leaños / 6:00-7:45pm / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

Friday, Feb 20 / CRITICAL RACE AND ETHNIC STUDIES / Steven Salaita / Seminar: “Inter/Nationalism from the New World to the Holy Land: Encountering Palestine in American Indian Studies” / 10:00am-12:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

Friday, Feb 20 / FRIDAY FORUM FOR GRADUATE RESEARCH / Melissa Yinger / “Ronsard’s Echo-critical Poetic Narcissism: The Elegies for Narcissus and Gâtine” / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

Friday, Feb 20 / CRITICAL RACE AND ETHNIC STUDIES / Steven Salaita / Public Talk, “Silencing Dissent: Palestine, Academic Freedom, and the New McCarthyism” / 2:00-4:00pm / Humanities I, Room 210

 

* To advertise your unit or department’s event in the “Of Interest” section of this weekly bulletin, please e-mail complete event information in text format (no PDFs) to cult@ucsc.edu no later than noon on Friday of the prior week.

* Additional information and regular updates on many “Of Interest” events can be found on the IHR website.
 


 


OF-INTEREST EVENT DESCRIPTIONS:

Wednesday & Thursday, Feb 18-19 / CENTER FOR JEWISH STUDIES / “Liminal Spaces and the Jewish Imagination Conference” / Humanities 1, Room 210

The Venice Ghetto serves as the starting point from which we address questions of modern Jewish spaces—a site that has played a central role in Jewish and European culture since the Jews were sequestered in the Ghetto at its founding in 1516. Contemporary globalization brings into focus the relationship between identity and spatial location, and highlights new and cross-cutting transnational allegiances.
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Wednesday, Feb 18 / HISTORY DEPARTMENT / Manu Bhagavan / “Toward Universal Relief and Rehabilitation: India, UNRRA, and the New Internationalism” / 2:00-4:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 520

“India” had been involved in the United Nations even in its wartime incarnation, inasmuch as the Crown Government of the colonized region brought the territory into the Second World War and, in turn, voted to support various institutions created to deal with the challenges wrought by the conflict. Among the most prominent of these was the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Agency (UNRRA), the mission of which was to aid countries negatively impacted by the military campaigns. The British Government of India strongly signaled its support even as the subcontinent weathered the effects of one the worst famines ever encountered in the region. UNRRA was based in the United States and led by several men who considered themselves friends of India, most notably famed New Yorkers Herbert Lehman and Fiorello LaGuardia. Over the next several years, UNRRA pushed to create an Indian office and to incorporate Indians into administration based in the US, in a good faith effort to circumvent charges of imperial complicity. So the agency leadership was especially surprised when they ran into resistance from India’s anti-colonial icons. UNRRA was too blind to the pernicious stranglehold of imperialism the Indians believed, and so had to be challenged, even as it was admired. The encounter thus exemplifies colonial India’s efforts to challenge and undo Great Power/Global North/Western control of UN bureaucracies from the outset, and to reset both the tone and the substance of international relations by insisting on shared responsibilities and mutual respect.

Manu Bhagavan is the Chair of the Human Rights Program at the Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute and a Professor of History at Hunter College and the Graduate Center at the City University of New York. He is a specialist on modern India, focusing on the twentieth-century late-colonial and post-colonial periods, with particular interests in human rights, (inter)nationalism, and questions of sovereignty. His most recent publication is The Peacemakers: India and the Quest for One World (Harper Collins, 2012).
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Wednesday, Feb 18 / VISUAL AND MEDIA CULTURES COLLOQUIA / Karen Barad / “Histories of Now: ‘Time Diffractions, Virtuality, and Material Imaginings’” / 4:00-6:00pm / Porter College, Room D245

Refreshments will be available 30 minutes before the talk.

Karen Barad is Professor of Feminist Studies, Philosophy, and History of Consciousness at the University of California at Santa Cruz. Barad’s Ph.D. is in theoretical particle physics and quantum field theory. Barad held a tenured appointment in a physics department before moving into more interdisciplinary spaces. Barad is the author of Meeting the Universe Halfway: Quantum Physics and the Entanglement of Matter and Meaning (Duke University Press, 2007) and numerous articles in the fields of physics, philosophy, science studies, poststructuralist theory, and feminist theory. Barad’s research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the Hughes Foundation, the Irvine Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. Barad is the Co-Director of the Science & Justice Graduate Training Program at UCSC.
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Wednesday, Feb 18 / FILM + DIGITAL MEDIA WEDNESDAY NIGHT CINEMA / “Videograms of a Revolution” / 7:00pm / Studio C (Communications 150)

In Europe in the fall of 1989, history took place before our very eyes. Farocki’s and Andrei Ujica’s Videograms shows the Romanian revolution of December 1989 in Bucharest in a new media-based form of historiography. Demonstrators occupied the television station in Bucharest and broadcast continuously for 120 hours, thereby establishing the television studio as a new historical site. Between December 21, 1989 (the day of Ceaucescu’s last speech) and December 26, 1989 (the first televised summary of his trial), the cameras recorded events at the most important locations in Bucharest, almost without exception. The determining medium of an era has always marked history, quite unambiguously so in that of modern Europe. As we know, the 20th century is filmic. But only the videocamera, with its heightened possibilities in terms of recording time and mobility, can bring the process of filming history to completion. Provided, of course, that there is history.
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Thursday, Feb 19 / LIVING WRITERS SERIES / John Jota Leaños / 6:00-7:45pm / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

John Jota Leaños is an award-winning Chicano new media artist using animation, documentary and performance focusing on the convergence of memory, social space and decolonization. Leaños’ animation work has been shown internationally at festivals and museums including the Sundance Film Festival, the Morelia International Film Festival, Mexico, San Francisco International Festival of Animation, the KOS Convention ’07, and the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego. Leaños has also exhibited at the 2002 and 2008 Whitney Biennial in New York, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Leaños is a Guggenheim Fellow in Film (2012), Creative Capital Foundation Grantee and has been an artist in residence at the University of California, Santa Barbara in the Center for Chicano Studies, Carnegie Mellon University in the Center for Arts in Society, and the Headlands Center for the Arts. Leaños is currently an Associate Professor of Social Documentary at the University of California, Santa Cruz.
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Friday, Feb 20 / CRITICAL RACE AND ETHNIC STUDIES / Steven Salaita / Seminar: “Inter/Nationalism from the New World to the Holy Land: Encountering Palestine in American Indian Studies” / 10:00am-12:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

Dr. Steven Salaita is the author of six books, including Israel’s Dead Soul, Modern Arab American Fiction: A Reader’s Guide, The Holy Land in Transit: Colonialism and the Quest for Canaan, and Anti-Arab Racism in the USA: Where it Comes From and What it Means for Politics.

For pre-circulated readings and to RSVP, please Contact Juliana Bruno (JulianaB@ucsc.edu). Co-Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Labor, the IHR Cultures in the Crisis of Capitalism Research Cluster, Students for Justice in Palestine, UAW 2865, the Santa Cruz Resource Center for Non-Violence, and the Palestine-Israel Action Committee.
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Friday, Feb 20 / FRIDAY FORUM FOR GRADUATE RESEARCH / Melissa Yinger / “Ronsard’s Echo-critical Poetic Narcissism: The Elegies for Narcissus and Gâtine” / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

Our current critical moment bears an ambivalent relationship to Renaissance humanism. On the one hand, we associate it with great art – Botticelli, Michelangelo, Petrarch – and on the other hand, we associate it with anthropocentrism and narcissism. But popular notions of narcissism threaten to obscure what Renaissance humanists found so appealing in Narcissus’s story and its accompanying aesthetic, an aesthetic that finds beauty in sameness. For this talk, I turn to the poetry of Pierre de Ronsard and examine his development of the formal features of this aesthetic in his elegy for Narcissus. Narcissus, of course, is only half of the story, however, and while Ronsard’s Narcissus elegy lays bare a particular cultural construction of beauty, his engagement with Echo’s story in a later poem, “Contre les bûcherons” (“Against the woodcutters”), bespeaks his anxieties about what that construction entails. His uneasiness, which bears a proleptic relationship to our own uneasiness about humanism, manifests itself as a nascent form of ecocriticism that is tethered to a narcissistic speaker; I call it Echo-criticism.

Melissa Yinger is a doctoral candidate in the department of literature. Her work focuses on lyric poetry of the Italian, French, and English Renaissance, and the works of William Shakespeare. She recently co-wrote an essay with Michael Ursell called “Shakespeare’s Books,” for The Ashgate Research Companion to Shakespeare and Classical Literature (forthcoming in 2016). For Friday Forum, Melissa will be presenting on the importance of Ovid’s Narcissus and Echo myth to the development of Renaissance humanism and poetics, as focalized through two poems by Pierre de Ronsard.

The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:00 to 1:30PM and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. Light refreshments will be available.

For more info, or to inquire about joining the roster of presenters for Spring quarter contact: fridayforum.ucsc@gmail.com
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Friday, Feb 20 / CRITICAL RACE AND ETHNIC STUDIES / Steven Salaita / Public Talk, “Silencing Dissent: Palestine, Academic Freedom, and the New McCarthyism” / 2:00-4:00pm / Humanities I, Room 210

Dr. Steven Salaita is the author of six books, including Israel’s Dead Soul, Modern Arab American Fiction: A Reader’s Guide, The Holy Land in Transit: Colonialism and the Quest for Canaan, and Anti-Arab Racism in the USA: Where it Comes From and What it Means for Politics.

Co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Labor, the IHR Cultures in the Crisis of Capitalism Research Cluster, Students for Justice in Palestine, UAW 2865, the Santa Cruz Resource Center for Non-Violence, and the Palestine-Israel Action Committee.
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Of Interest Events for Week of February 9, 2015

 

Monday, Feb 9 / CRISIS IN THE CULTURES OF CAPITALISM / Ching Kwan Lee / “Buying Stability in China: Markets, Protests and Authoritarianism” / 4:00-6:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

Monday, Feb 9 / ITALIAN STUDIES / Robert Davis / “The Socio-Economy of Head Hunting in Late Renaissance Italy” / 5:00-6:30pm / Stevenson Fireside Lounge

Tuesday, Feb 10 / CENTER FOR EMERGING WORLDS / Noah Salomon / “Understanding Conflict in South Sudan” / 6:30-7:30pm / Social Sciences 2, Room 75

Tuesday, Feb 10 / Institute of the Arts and Sciences / LASER: Leonardo Art/Science Evening Rendezvous / 6:45pm / DARC Room 108

Wednesday, Feb 11 / CENTER FOR EMERGING WORLDS / Noah Salomon / “When the State is Everywhere: Rethinking the Islamic Public Sphere” / 3:15-4:45pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

Wednesday, Feb 11 / FILM + DIGITAL MEDIA WEDNESDAY NIGHT CINEMA / “Indoctrination” & “A Day in the Life of Consumers” / 7:00pm / Studio C (Communications 150)

Thursday, Feb 12 / CENTER FOR EMERGING WORLDS / Noah Salomon / Manuscript Reading Seminar: “The People of Sudan Love You, Oh Messenger of God”/ 10:00am-12:00pm / Social Sciences 1, Room 261

Thursday, Feb 12 / LIVING WRITERS SERIES / Luis Alfaro / 6:00-7:45pm / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

Friday, Feb 13 / CHICANO LATINO RESEARCH CENTER / Carmen Boullosa / “Texas: The Great Theft” / 10:00am-12:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

Friday, Feb 13 / FRIDAY FORUM FOR GRADUATE RESEARCH / Delio Vásquez / “Criminalized Politics and Politicized Crime: Illegal Black Resistance in the 60s and 70s” / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

Friday, Feb 13 / HISTORY DEPARTMENT / Martin Devecka / “Polly Want a Caesar? Talking Birds and Prophetic Birds in Early Imperial Rome” / 4:00-5:30pm / Humanities I, Room 520

 

* To advertise your unit or department’s event in the “Of Interest” section of this weekly bulletin, please e-mail complete event information in text format (no PDFs) to cult@ucsc.edu no later than noon on Friday of the prior week.

* Additional information and regular updates on many “Of Interest” events can be found on the IHR website.

 


 

OF-INTEREST EVENT DESCRIPTIONS:

Monday, Feb 9 / CRISIS IN THE CULTURES OF CAPITALISM / Ching Kwan Lee / “Buying Stability in China: Markets, Protests and Authoritarianism” / 4:00-6:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

This talk outlines China’s trajectory of commodification and the counter-movements by state and society in the past quarter century. Unpacking the class specific dynamics and experiences of precarization, I discuss how the commodification of land, labor, housing and the environment has triggered collective struggles by farmers, workers and the middle class. To maintain social stability, the Chinese state has responded, on the one hand, with new social protection policies of uneven effectiveness, and on the other, a practice of “buying stability” which unwittingly commodifies state authority and citizen’s rights, sowing seeds of precariousness in the regime’s authoritarian governance.
Ching Kwan Lee is Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Los Angeles. She obtained her PhD in Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley and taught at the Chinese University of Hong Kong and University of Michigan before moving to UCLA. Her publications have focused on labor, social activism, political sociology and development in China and the Global South.

Lee is author of Against the Law: Labor Protests in China’s Rustbelt and Sunbelt (2007), and Gender and the South China Miracle: Two Worlds of Factory Women (1998). Her edited and co-edited books include From the Iron Rice Bowl to Informalization: Markets, Workers and the State in a Changing China (2011); Reclaiming Chinese Society: New Social Activism (2009), Re-envisioning the Chinese Revolution: Politics and Poetics of Collective Memory in Reform China (2007) and Working in China: Ethnographies of Labor and Workplace Transformation (2007).

She is currently working on two book manuscripts. One is on forty years of state and society relation in China, and the other on Chinese investment in Zambia.
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Monday, Feb 9 / ITALIAN STUDIES / Robert Davis / “The Socio-Economy of Head Hunting in Late Renaissance Italy” / 5:00-6:30pm / Stevenson Fireside Lounge

A distinguished professor of Early Modern Italy, Venice, and the Mediterranean, Professor Robert Davis has written or co-authored eight books and many articles that deal with a variety of topics, including slavery in the Mediterranean, Venetian shipbuilding, masculinity and the rituals of public violence, and Venice as a modern tourist city. His broad interests are always anchored by his fascination with the lives of ordinary people. Professor Davis’ current work is on brigandage in Early Modern Italy.

This lecture is co-sponsored by Italian Studies, the History Department, and Stevenson College. Contact: clpolecr@ucsc.edu
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Tuesday, Feb 10 / CENTER FOR EMERGING WORLDS / Noah Salomon / “Understanding Conflict in South Sudan” / 6:30-7:30pm / Social Sciences 2, Room 75

The recent outbreak of violence in South Sudan was quickly described in the media as a re-emergence of atavistic tendencies within its population and understood within the framework of a tribal conflict between two age-old enemies. While ethnic idioms have emerged as ways of organizing and motivating violence, today’s civil war in South Sudan is emblematic of much larger tensions built into the very blueprint of the world’s newest nation. In this lecture, Salomon will draw on his research in Sudan and South Sudan to contextualize the current conflict within a understanding of Sudanese/South Sudanese politics at large, as well as offer some examples of how these politics have been experienced by the diverse communities that have lived through them.
Moderated by Mark Massoud, Assistant Professor of Politics and Legal Studies, UCSC
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Tuesday, Feb 10 / Institute of the Arts and Sciences / LASER: Leonardo Art/Science Evening Rendezvous / 6:45pm / DARC Room 108

Featuring:

Lewis Watts is Professor Emeritus of Art at UC Santa Cruz. He is a photographer, curator, and archivist, examining the “cultural landscape” of African American Communities. He is co-author of New Orleans Suite, Music and Culture in Transition (2013) and Harlem of the West: The San Francisco Fillmore Jazz Era (2006) and his work has appeared in numerous exhibitions and publications.

Noah Wardrip-Fruin is Associate Professor of Computer Science at UC Santa Cruz and co-director of the Expressive Intelligence Studio, one of the world’s largest technical research groups focused on games. He also directs the Playable Media group in UCSC’s Digital Arts and New Media program.

Deanna Shemek is Professor of Literature at UC Santa Cruz. Her research and teaching centers on Renaissance studies and focuses on the crossroads between literary, historical, art historical, and political materials. Shemak has recently embarked on a digital humanities project aimed at preservation, access, and creative study of the European Renaissance.

Trained primarily as an animal behaviorist, Colleen Reichmuth conducts research in the areas of comparative cognition, bioacoustics, and behavioral ecology. Dr. Reichmuth currently heads the Cognition and Sensory Systems Laboratory, based at UC Santa Cruz’s Long Marine Lab. She has a B.Sc. in Biology, a M.Sc. in Marine Science, and a Ph.D. in Ocean Sciences, all from the UC Santa Cruz.
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Wednesday, Feb 11 / CENTER FOR EMERGING WORLDS / Noah Salomon / “When the State is Everywhere: Rethinking the Islamic Public Sphere” / 3:15-4:45pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

PLEASE NOTE THE TIME CHANGE.

Studies of the post-colonial state in the Muslim world have relied too often on a hard and fast distinction between state and civil society, official discourse and the public sphere. Questioning both the gloomy premise of an absolute space of discipline in the former and the utopian idealism of an unfettered democratic space of deliberation in the latter, my paper seeks to interrogate the continuing salience of the state/public sphere distinction on both conceptual and empirical grounds. Drawing off recent literature on the state from anthropology and political theory, while adding ethnographic observations from the Sudanese experiment with the Islamic state into the mix, my paper seeks to challenge the apotheosis of state sovereignty on which such theories of the public sphere are based, resituating the state within the political practice of everyday life. Through a close ethnographic reading of a movement in contemporary Islamic poetry in Sudan—an under-examined dwelling place for both the state and the public sphere—I will examine how state projects become spaces of creative deliberation and how the public sphere comes to rely on modes of subjectivation central to state ideology. In doing so, I hope both to put into question the coherence of these central categories of political analysis, as well as to lay bare the complicated inner-workings of the Islamic state as it seeks at once to monopolize political power and to extend it into new domains.

Event is free and open to the public. For more information contact lrofel@ucsc.edu or sjetha@ucsc.edu
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Wednesday, Feb 11 / FILM + DIGITAL MEDIA WEDNESDAY NIGHT CINEMA / “Indoctrination” & “A Day in the Life of Consumers” / 7:00pm / Studio C (Communications 150)

INDOCTRINATION (1987, 43 min.)

This film is about a five-day seminar designed to teach executives to “sell themselves” better. This course, designed for managers, teaches the basic rules of dialectics and rhetoric and provides training in body language, gesture and facial expression. The aim of selling something has always been a principle of mercantile action. Yet it was only through the marriage of psychology and modern capitalism that the idea of selling oneself was perfected.

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF CONSUMERS (1993, 44 min.)

In this highly conceptual piece, Farocki pieces together every moment of a typical day, from dawn to nightfall, using only television advertisements. Taken out of context and streamed seamlessly together, these German commercials of the 80s and 90s reveal the unsettling oppressiveness and mania of a consumer-driven society.
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Thursday, Feb 12 / CENTER FOR EMERGING WORLDS / Noah Salomon / Manuscript Reading Seminar: “The People of Sudan Love You, Oh Messenger of God”/ 10:00am-12:00pm / Social Sciences 1, Room 261

Featuring Professor Noah Salomon, Assistant Professor of Religion, Carleton College.To receive readings, please email sjetha@ucsc.edu
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Thursday, Feb 12 / LIVING WRITERS SERIES / Luis Alfaro / 6:00-7:45pm / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

The Creative Writing Program presents Luis Alfaro in the Winter 2015 Living Writers Series.
Luis Alfaro is a Chicano writer and performer known for his work in poetry, theatre, short stories, performance and journalism. He is also a producer and director who spent ten years at the Mark Taper Forum as Associate Producer, Director of New Play Development and co-director of the Latino Theatre Initiative.
His work has been shown at venues including La Jolla Playhouse, Smithsonian Museum, Institute of Contemporary Art in London, The Kennedy Center in Washington D.C., Magic Theatre, Goodman Theatre-Chicago, and Latino Chicago and Playwrights Arena in Los Angeles. His plays and performances include Oedipus el Rey, Electricidad, Downtown, No Holds Barrio, Body of Faith, Straight as a Line, Bitter Homes and Gardens, Ladybird, Black Butterfly, and Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner.
He teaches at the University of Southern California (in the Graduate Playwriting Program, Solo Performance, and Youth Theater) and California Institute of the Arts (in Solo Performance and Actors Studio).
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Friday, Feb 13 / CHICANO LATINO RESEARCH CENTER / Carmen Boullosa / “Texas: The Great Theft” / 10:00am-12:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

Carmen Boullosa is one of Mexico’s leading novelists, poets, and playwrights, whose works interweave speculative, historical, and psychological themes with a powerful feminist point of view and a sharp satirical wit. She has published fifteen novels, among them El complot de los románticos (winner of the Premio de Novela Café Gijón in 2008), Las paredes hablan, La virgen y el violin, and perhaps most famously, Llanto. Her works in English translation include They’re Cows, We’re Pigs; Leaving Tabasco; and Cleopatra Dismounts, all published by Grove Press, and Jump of the Manta Ray, with illustrations by Philip Hughes, published by The Old Press. Her novels have also been translated into Italian, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese, Chinese, and Russian. A prominent essayist and journalist, she writes a regular column for El Universal in Mexico City. She has taught at Georgetown, Columbia, and New York University, as well as at universities in nearly a dozen other countries. She is currently Distinguished Lecturer at the City College of New York.

In her latest novel, Texas: The Great Theft (Deep Vellum, 2014), originally published as Tejas: La gran ladronería en la frontera norte (Editorial Alfaguera, 2013), Carmen Boullosa challenges US versions of the romantic origins of Texas. Set on the eve of the US Civil War in the fictional twin border cities of Bruneville and Matasanchez, the novel depicts relations among gringos, German immigrants, Mexican landowners and laborers, escaped slaves, Apaches, and Comanches. In the words of the Dallas Morning News’ Roberto Ontiveros, it “sardonically explodes and seductively reins itself back in with a panoptic prose that stares down hard into the absurd and uncomfortable prejudices that have historically split this region.”

For an advance PDF copy of the novel in Spanish and/or in English, please contact Kirsten Silva Gruesz (ksgruesz@ucsc.edu).
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Friday, Feb 13 / FRIDAY FORUM FOR GRADUATE RESEARCH / Delio Vásquez / “Criminalized Politics and Politicized Crime: Illegal Black Resistance in the 60s and 70s” / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

When political agents engage in criminal acts, and when criminals engage in political acts, both groups are forced to face the language of the state, in particular legal discourse through indictment, prosecution, and imprisonment. How these groups portray themselves and their intentions during these moments of state interpellation reveals a lot about the epistemological relationship between political resistance and criminal activity. In my attempt to explore this terrain, I look at two African American organizations from the 1960s and 70s: the Black Liberation Army and the Chicago-based Black P Stone Nation/El Rukns gang. I also draw on insights and language from the histories of other “political criminals,” such as the California Radical Prison Movement and the French Illegalists (early 20th century anarchists who embraced criminality). I examine the contradictory ways that participants depict themselves, and how these epistemological frames help them pursue their goals.

The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:00 to 1:30PM and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. Light refreshments will be available.

For more info, or to inquire about joining the roster of presenters for Spring quarter contact: fridayforum.ucsc@gmail.com
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Friday, Feb 13 / HISTORY DEPARTMENT / Martin Devecka / “Polly Want a Caesar? Talking Birds and Prophetic Birds in Early Imperial Rome” / 4:00-5:30pm / Humanities I, Room 520

In Republican Rome, birds had served as the messengers of the gods, communicating in ways that only a few religious specialists could fully understand and interpret. At the turn of the first century CE, these same birds began to speak plain Latin, apparently endorsing the new regime of the Caesars in language that anyone could understand. On closer examination, however, these talking birds turn out to be transmitting a much more troubling message about the constitution of the Roman body politic at a moment of uncertainty and rapid change.

Martin Devecka is a post-doctoral fellow at Yale University who will join the Classical Studies faculty at UC Santa Cruz in 2015-16. He is a cultural historian with a special interest in applying the methods of sociology to the ancient world. Current projects include a comparative history of ruins, a historical zoology of the Roman Empire, and an investigation of peripatetic attitudes toward technology.
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Of Interest Events for Week of February 2, 2015

 

Monday, Feb 2 / CRISIS IN THE CULTURES OF CAPITALISM / Steve Wright / “The Political: Some Experiences from the Italian Operaismo of the 1960s and 1970s” / 4:00-6:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

Tuesday, Feb 3 / CRISIS IN THE CULTURES OF CAPITALISM / Steve Wright / Seminar: “Revolution from Above? Money and Class Composition in Italian Operaismo” / 2:00-4:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

Wednesday, Feb 4 / FILM + DIGITAL MEDIA WEDNESDAY NIGHT CINEMA / “Still Life” / 7:00pm / Studio C (Communications 150)

Thursday, Feb 5 / LIVING WRITERS SERIES / Rigoberto Gonzalez / 6:00-7:45pm / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

Thursday, Feb 5 / SESNON ART GALLERY / Tom Franco / The Artist Community Collaborative Experience / 7:30-8:30pm / UCSC Music Center Recital Hall

Friday, Feb 6 / FRIDAY FORUM FOR GRADUATE RESEARCH / Melissa Brzycki / “Inventing the Socialist Child, 1945-1976” / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

 

* To advertise your unit or department’s event in the “Of Interest” section of this weekly bulletin, please e-mail complete event information in text format (no PDFs) to cult@ucsc.edu no later than noon on Friday of the prior week.

* Additional information and regular updates on many “Of Interest” events can be found on the IHR website.

 


 

OF-INTEREST EVENT DESCRIPTIONS:

Monday, Feb 2 / CRISIS IN THE CULTURES OF CAPITALISM / Steve Wright / “The Political: Some Experiences from the Italian Operaismo of the 1960s and 1970s” / 4:00-6:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

This talk will critically examine debates around ‘the political’ amongst the Italian workerists. While championing new understandings of class composition that challenged the traditional Leninist separation of economic and political struggles, the workerists of the 1960s and 1970s nonetheless struggled to formulate an agreed approach to theorizing and practicing ‘the political’. The talk will seek to explore the ways in which this tension played itself out, from early debates concerning the traditional institutions of the workers movement, to efforts to develop organizational projects outside the existing parties and unions. Along the way, attention will also be paid to the contributions of those (such as the editors of Collegamenti and Le operaie della casa) who, despite the incisiveness of many of their contributions, found themselves situated largely on the margins of the workerists’ debates as these unfolded at the time.

Steve Wright teaches in the Faculty of Information Technology, Monash University, and is the author of Storming Heaven: Class Composition and Struggle in Italian Autonomist Marxism (Pluto Press, 2002). His current research is focused on the creation and use of documents amongst the Italian workerists of the 1960s and 1970s.
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Tuesday, Feb 3 / CRISIS IN THE CULTURES OF CAPITALISM / Steve Wright / Seminar: “Revolution from Above? Money and Class Composition in Italian Operaismo” / 2:00-4:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

Steve Wright will be leading a seminar discussion based on “Revolution from Above? Money and Class Composition in Italian Operaismo,” recently published in Marcel van der Linden and Karl Heinz Roth, Beyond Marx: Theorising the Global Labour Relations of the Twenty-First Century (Brill, 2013).

Participants are invited to read the text and join the discussion. The text can be downloaded here.

This seminar is part of the series “What Is to Be Done? Organizational Forms and Political Futures,” organized by the Crisis in the Cultures of Capitalism Research Cluster and the Institute for Humanities Research, with the co-sponsorship of the Literature, Sociology, Anthropology, and Politics Departments; Stevenson, Cowell, and Porter Colleges; and the Vice Chancellor for Research.
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Wednesday, Feb 4 / FILM + DIGITAL MEDIA WEDNESDAY NIGHT CINEMA / “Still Life” / 7:00pm / Studio C (Communications 150)

STILL LIFE (1997, 56 min.)
According to Harun Farocki, today’s photographers working in advertising are, in a way, continuing the tradition of 17th century Flemish painters in that they depict objects from everyday life – the “still life”. The filmmaker illustrates this intriguing hypothesis with three documentary sequences, which show the photographers at work creating a contemporary “still life”: a cheese-board, beer glasses and an expensive watch.
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Thursday, Feb 5 / LIVING WRITERS SERIES / Rigoberto Gonzalez / 6:00-7:45pm / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

The Creative Writing Program presents Rigoberto Gonzalez in the Winter 2015 Living Writers Series.

Rigoberto González is the author of fifteen books of poetry and prose, and the editor of Camino del Sol: Fifteen Years of Latina and Latino Writing. He is the recipient of Guggenheim and NEA fellowships, winner of the American Book Award, The Poetry Center Book Award, The Shelley Memorial Award of The Poetry Society of America, the Lambda Literary Award, the Lenore Marshall Prize from the Academy of American Poets, and a grant from the New York Foundation for the Arts. He is contributing editor for Poets & Writers Magazine, on the executive board of directors of the National Book Critics Circle, and is professor of English at Rutgers-Newark, the State University of New Jersey.
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Thursday, Feb 5 / SESNON ART GALLERY / Tom Franco / The Artist Community Collaborative Experience / 7:30-8:30pm / UCSC Music Center Recital Hall

To kick off our yearlong celebration of UC Santa Cruz’s 50th anniversary, the Sesnon Gallery is thrilled to present an innovative exhibition collaboration and performance series with UCSC alumnus Tom Franco and his Firehouse Art Collective, along with UCSC students, alumni and special guests.
This Co-Lab project is part of a Porter College course called Curatorial Practice, taught by Sesnon Gallery Director Shelby Graham with special guest Tom Franco. This course will cultivate a creative community through a collaborative exhibition format. The students will learn participatory aspects of exhibition development, performance, promotion, art handling and installation, including a chance to paint collaborative murals inside and outside of the Sesnon Gallery.
Tom Franco is an artist based in Berkeley, California, and the founder and director of the Firehouse Art Collective. Franco was an Art major at UC Santa Cruz (earning his BA in 2002), and then studied ceramics at the California College of Arts in Oakland (CCA). His work as a sculptor and painter has been the foundation for the Tom Franco Co-Lab, which is comprised of works done in tandem with one or more artists. Franco’s philosophy around art practice has always been centered on collaboration, with other influences on his work such as dance ensemble, Tai Chi and martial arts. These practices provided the backbone for his view that visual arts should be experienced in groups instead of in isolation and that performance is a central element in understanding visual representation.
Exhibition Dates: Thursday, February 5, 2015 – Friday, March 13, 2015
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Friday, Feb 6 / FRIDAY FORUM FOR GRADUATE RESEARCH / Melissa Brzycki / “Inventing the Socialist Child, 1945-1976” / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

Melissa Brzycki is a graduate student in History. Her dissertation project explores efforts to stabilize the place of children in Maoist China (1949-1976.) In 1949 the new People’s Republic of China proclaimed its success in part by moving to normalize the lives of children who had been orphaned, traumatized, and denied schooling by eight years of Japanese invasion and four years of tension and outright civil war. Melissa’s research focuses on the thinking, institution-building, and daily practices by which childhood was re-established in the context of socialist nation-building. Her research explores what the proper place for children looked like during this time of industrialization and increased agricultural production, which was accompanied by, and closely connected to, a massive mobilization of women. Her work also explores the child as a social subject and focal point of the state’s political imaginings about the ideal socialist upbringing, the relationship between state actors and families, and the shared responsibility among the various state organizations tasked with creating the socialist child.

The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:00 to 1:30PM and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. Light refreshments will be available.

For more info, or to inquire about joining the roster of presenters for Spring quarter contact: fridayforum.ucsc@gmail.com
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Of Interest Events for Week of January 26, 2015

 

Tuesday, Jan 27 / FEMINIST SCIENCE STUDIES COLLOQUIA / Kristina Lyons / “Decomposition as Life Politics: Soils, Shared Bodies, and Stamina Under the Gun of the US Colombia War on Drugs” / 5:00-6:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

Tuesday, Jan 27 / IHR QUESTIONS THAT MATTER / Making the Cosmos Local—SOLD OUT / 6:00pm / Kuumbwa Jazz Center

Wednesday, Jan 28 / FILM + DIGITAL MEDIA WEDNESDAY NIGHT CINEMA / “War at a Distance” and “Eye/Machine III” / 7:00pm / Studio C (Communications 150)

Wednesday, Jan 28 / 31st ANNUAL MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. MEMORIAL CONVOCATION / Angela Davis / “Racism, Militarism, Poverty: From Ferguson to Palestine” / 7:00pm – 9:00pm / Santa Cruz Civic Auditorium

Thursday, Jan 29 / LIVING WRITERS SERIES / Maya Chinchilla / 6:00-7:45pm / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

Friday, Jan 30 / FRIDAY FORUM FOR GRADUATE RESEARCH / Aubrey Hobart / “The Queen of Heaven and the Prince of Angels: Saintly Rivalry in Colonial Mexico” / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

Friday, Jan 30 / ANCIENT STUDIES / Michael Frachetti / “Uncovering a Nomadic City Along the Medieval Silk Road” / 5:00-7:00pm / Humanities I, Room 210

 

* To advertise your unit or department’s event in the “Of Interest” section of this weekly bulletin, please e-mail complete event information in text format (no PDFs) to cult@ucsc.edu no later than noon on Friday of the prior week.

*For more on many of the Of Interest events please see the Institute for Humanities Research calendar.

 


 


Tuesday, Jan 27 / FEMINIST SCIENCE STUDIES COLLOQUIA / Kristina Lyons / “Decomposition as Life Politics: Soils, Shared Bodies, and Stamina Under the Gun of the US Colombia War on Drugs” / 5:00-6:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

What does it mean to live in a criminalized ecology in the Andean Amazonian foothills of Colombia? In what way does antinarcotics policy that aims to eradicate la mata que mata (the plant that kills) pursue peace through poison? Since 2000, the US-Colombia War on Drugs has relied on the militarized aerial fumigation of coca plants coupled with alternative development interventions that aim to forcibly eradicate illicit-based rural livelihoods. With ethnographic engagement among small farmers in the frontier department of Putumayo – gateway to the country’s Amazon and a region that has been the focus of hemispheric counternarcotic operations – this talk explores the di‑erent possibilities and foreclosures for life and death that emerge in a tropical forest ecology pushed to its metabolic limits under military duress. I closely trace the way human-soil relations come to potentiate forms of resistance to the violence and criminalization produced by militarized, growth-oriented development.

Kristina Lyons, PhD in Anthropology from UC Davis is a UC President’s Postdoc Fellow at UCSC in the Anthropology Department and with the Science and Justice Research Center.

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Tuesday, Jan 27 / IHR QUESTIONS THAT MATTER / Making the Cosmos Local—SOLD OUT / 6:00pm / Kuumbwa Jazz Center

This series brings together UC Santa Cruz scholars with community members to explore questions that matter to all of us.

Featuring: Minghui Hu (History) and Anthony Aguirre (Physics)
Facilitated by: Nathaniel Deutsch (IHR Director)

For millennia, people across the globe have searched the sky for answers. They have imagined and reimagined the cosmos, from an infinite and eternal backdrop full of other worlds, to a young Earth encircled by nearby planets and crystal spheres of stars. What is the relation between our lives here on Earth and the wider realm of nearby planets, distant stars, unfathomably faraway galaxies, and a potentially infinite universe—or swarm of universes? Where do we find, or create, meaning in such a picture?

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Wednesday, Jan 28 / FILM + DIGITAL MEDIA WEDNESDAY NIGHT CINEMA / “War at a Distance” and “Eye/Machine III” / 7:00pm / Studio C (Communications 150)

WAR AT A DISTANCE (2003, 54 min.)
Since the Gulf War in 1991, warfare and reporting it have become hyper-technological affairs, in which real and computer-generated images cannot be distinguished any more. With the aid of new and also unique archive material, Farocki sketches a picture of the relationship between military strategy and industrial production and shows how war technology finds its way into everyday use.

EYE / MACHINE III (2003, 25 min.)
“These are images which do not portray a process, but are themselves part of a process. As early as the Eighties, cruise missiles used a stored image of a real landscape, then took an actual image during flight; the software compared the two images, resulting in a comparison between idea and reality, a confrontation between pure war and the impurity of the actual. Superfluous reality is denied–a constant denial provoking opposition.”
–Harun Farocki

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Wednesday, Jan 28 / 31st ANNUAL MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. MEMORIAL CONVOCATION / Angela Davis / “Racism, Militarism, Poverty: From Ferguson to Palestine” / 7:00 – 9:00pm / Santa Cruz Civic Auditorium

Through her activism and scholarship over the last decades, Angela Davis has been deeply involved in our nation’s quest for social justice. Her work as an educator – both at the university level and in the larger public sphere – has always emphasized the importance of building communities of struggle for economic, racial, and gender equality. She is Distinguished Professor Emerita of History of Consciousness and Feminist Studies at UC Santa Cruz, and the author of nine books, including her most recent book of essays called The Meaning of Freedom.

In recent years a persistent theme of her work has been the range of social problems associated with incarceration and the generalized criminalization of those communities that are most affected by poverty and racial discrimination. She draws upon her own experiences in the early seventies as a person who spent eighteen months in jail and on trial, after being placed on the FBI’s “Ten Most Wanted List.”

She is a founding member of Critical Resistance, a national organization dedicated to the dismantling of the prison industrial complex. Internationally, she is affiliated with Sisters Inside, an abolitionist organization based in Queensland, Australia that works in solidarity with women in prison.

Having helped to popularize the notion of a “prison industrial complex,” she now urges her audiences to think seriously about the future possibility of a world without prisons and to help forge a 21st century abolitionist movement.

Also featuring a performance by: Singer and songwriter, AlexisRose

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Thursday, Jan 29 / LIVING WRITERS SERIES / Maya Chinchilla / 6:00-7:45pm / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

The Creative Writing Program presents Korimar Press, Lorenzo Herrera Y Lozano & Maya Chincilla in the Winter 2015 Living Writers Series.

Maya Chinchilla is a Guatemalan, Bay Area-based writer, video artist, and educator. Maya received her MFA in English and Creative Writing from Mills College and her undergraduate degree from University of California, Santa Cruz, where she also founded and co-edited the annual non-exclusive publication, La Revista. Maya writes and performs poetry that explores themes of historical memory, heartbreak, tenderness, sexuality, and alternative futures. Her work —sassy, witty, performative, and self-aware— draws on a tradition of truth-telling and poking fun at the wounds we carry.

Her work has been published in anthologies and journals including: Mujeres de Maíz, Sinister Wisdom, Americas y Latinas: A Stanford Journal of Latin American Studies, Cipactli Journal, and The Lunada Literary Anthology. Maya is a founding member of the performance group Las Manas, a former artist-in-residence at Galería de La Raza in San Francisco, CA, and La Peña Cultural Center in Berkeley, CA, and is a VONA Voices and Dos Brujas workshop alum. She is the co-editor of Desde El Epicentro: An anthology of Central American Poetry and Art and is a lecturer at San Francisco State University.

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Friday, Jan 30 / FRIDAY FORUM FOR GRADUATE RESEARCH / Aubrey Hobart / “The Queen of Heaven and the Prince of Angels: Saintly Rivalry in Colonial Mexico” / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

Aubrey Hobart is a graduate student in History of Art and Visual Culture (HAVC). Her presentation explores evidence that the historic rivalry between Tenochtitlan/Mexico City and Tlaxcala did not simply fade away after the arrival of the Spanish in the sixteenth century, but instead transferred to the veneration of Catholic saints, especially the Virgin Mary and the archangel Michael — saints that seemed to confer political and religious favor at the local level in association with specific miracle-working images of themselves.

The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:00 to 1:30PM and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. Light refreshments will be available.

For more info, or to inquire about joining the roster of presenters for Spring quarter contact: fridayforum.ucsc@gmail.com

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Friday, Jan 30 / ANCIENT STUDIES / Michael Frachetti / “Uncovering a Nomadic City Along the Medieval Silk Road” / 5:00-7:00pm / Humanities I, Room 210

From at least 200 BC to the 16th century CE, the Eurasian Silk Road formed the most extensive network of trade and commerce the world had ever seen. Its pathways linked populations from Beijing to Jerusalem in one of the first global networks. Much of what we know about the Silk Road is defined by archaeology from lowland oases, but mountainous regions occupied by nomads offer new insights. The newly discovered city of Tashbulak, unearthed in 2011 in the highlands of Uzbekistan, is one of the most recent and exciting discoveries along the Medieval Silk Road. Tashbulak pushes us to question our common understanding of the role of nomads in shaping the history and technology of medieval empires across Central Asia and sparks many questions about political, religious and economic change in the 11th century CE.

Dr. Michael Frachetti is Associate Professor of Anthropology at Washington University in St. Louis. His work addresses the ancient nomadic societies of Central and Eastern Eurasia and how these shaped inter-regional networks from as early as 2000 BCE (the Mid-Bronze Age) down to the time of the later Silk Roads. He is the author of Pastoralist Landscapes and Social Interaction in Bronze Age Eurasia (UCPress, 2008). He currently conducts archaeological field research in Eastern Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan.

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Of Interest Events for the Week of January 19, 2015

 

Tuesday, Jan 20 / FEMINIST SCIENCE STUDIES COLLOQUIA / Sara Giordano / “Tinkering with Science: IRB, DIY and Feminist Science Ethics” / 5:00-6:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

Wednesday, Jan 21 / CENTER FOR EMERGING WORLDS / Naveeda Khan / MANUSCRIPT READING: “The Flow Forms of Electrons on the Sand Bars of the Jamuna” / 3:30-5:00pm / Social Sciences 1, Room 261

Wednesday, Jan 21 / FILM + DIGITAL MEDIA WEDNESDAY NIGHT CINEMA / “As You See” and “Respite” / 7:00pm / Studio C (Communications 150)

Thursday, Jan 22 / CRISIS IN THE CULTURES OF CAPITALISM / Warren Neidich / 10:00-11:45am / Oakes College, Room 105

Thursday, Jan 22 / CENTER FOR EMERGING WORLDS / Naveeda Khan / Graduate Student Workshop / 10:00am – 12:00pm / Social Sciences 1, Room 261

Thursday, Jan 22 / HISTORY OF CONSCIOUSNESS / Lauren Berlant / “Structures of Unfeeling: Mysterious Skin” / 2:00 – 3:30pm / Humanities I, Room 210

Thursday, Jan 22 / LIVING WRITERS SERIES / Veronica Reyes & Javier Huerta / 6:00-7:45pm / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

Friday, Jan 23 / FRIDAY FORUM FOR GRADUATE RESEARCH / Wes Modes / “A Secret History of American River People” / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202


 


Tuesday, Jan 20 / FEMINIST SCIENCE STUDIES COLLOQUIA / Sara Giordano / “Tinkering with Science: IRB, DIY and Feminist Science Ethics” / 5:00-6:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

The field of synthetic biology has been promoted as a new kind of science based on the promises of affordable medicines, environmental bioremediation and democratic, DIY science practices. With the development of this field the subject of the Tinkerer as a creative, anti-establishment scientist has emerged. In this presentation, Giordano considers multiple definitions of tinkering to examine conceptions of the relationship between “ethics” and “science.” They look at the production of this relationship at three sites—traditional institutional sciences, DIY synthetic biology, and feminist science—drawing attention not only to the differing ideas of ethics but to the ways the latter two related oppositionally to the first. Finally, by using their own neuroscientific research on muscle coordination, I suggest possibilities for feminist sciences rooted in social justice to ethically tinker in knowledge production.

Sara Giordano is an Assistant Professor of feminist science studies in the Department of Women’s Studies at San Diego State University.

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Wednesday, Jan 21 / CENTER FOR EMERGING WORLDS / Naveeda Khan / MANUSCRIPT READING: “The Flow Forms of Electrons on the Sand Bars of the Jamuna” / 3:30-5:00pm / Social Sciences 1, Room 261

This is a manuscript reading seminar with Professor Khan. Students are welcome. Email sjetha@ucsc.edu to receive readings.

Dr. Khan is a multidisciplinary scholar with research and teaching interests in environmental studies, religious studies, urban studies, agrarian change, science studies, and political and social anthropology. Methodologically, her work relies on ethnographic fieldwork, archival work, and textual analysis. Her first book, Muslim Becoming: Aspiration and Skepticism in Pakistan (Duke University Press, 2012), traces the emergence of Pakistan as a future-oriented society of experimentation and political and ethical aspiration. Challenging conventional claims about Pakistan’s relationship to Islam as one of fragmentation and failure, Khan analyzes how intellectuals and ordinary people strive to be better Muslims and, in so doing, recast Islam as an open religion with possible futures yet unrealized. Central to the book is Khan’s focus on poet, philosopher, and politician Muhammad Iqbal, whose engagement with European and Muslim philosophers reflects, Khan argues, a tradition of striving also taken up in everyday practices of mosque building, Qur’an reading, and religious pilgrimage.

Her more recent research focuses on the intersection of ethics, ecologies, and temporalities, taking up how rural and riverine environments in Bangladesh intersect with multiple possible futures, including those of everyday life, of material substances like silt sedimentation, and of climate change. Moreover, Khan is committed to intervening as a scholar in contemporary public and political debates, and is the editor of Beyond Crisis: Re-evaluating Pakistan (Routledge India/UK, 2010), which brings together nineteen scholars in the social sciences and humanities to explore what it means to live with or refuse the designation of crisis.

Although South Asia is the regional focus of Khan’s research, her thematic interests are broad: global Islam; the built environment; temporality and futurity; political aspiration; everyday life; philosophies of skepticism; political theology; discourses of crisis; human and non-human ecologies; and the anthropocene.

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Wednesday, Jan 21 / FILM + DIGITAL MEDIA WEDNESDAY NIGHT CINEMA / “As You See” and “Respite” / 7:00pm / Studio C (Communications 150)

AS YOU SEE (1986, 72 min.)
This wide-ranging film essay continues Farocki’s concern for the links between technology and warfare, tracing the ways that engineering advances have brought increasing automation and mechanization to physical labor and warfare , formerly the exclusive province of the body. A key sequence involving the dubbing of a porn film implies that this mechanization extends to another bodily province-sexuality itself. As You See lays the foundation for Farocki’s later essay films to come by bringing together little-known fragments of history with sharp interviews and extended observational sequences.

RESPITE (2007, 40 min.)
Respite consists of silent black-and-white films shot at Westerbork, a Dutch refugee camp established in 1939 for Jews fleeing Germany. In 1942, after the occupation of Holland, its function was reversed by the Nazis and it became a ‘transit camp.’ In 1944, the camp commander commissioned a film, shot by a photographer, Rudolph Breslauer.

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Thursday, Jan 22 / CRISIS IN THE CULTURES OF CAPITALISM / Warren Neidich / 10:00-11:45am / Oakes College, Room 105

Warren Neidich is an artist and critic, editor of The Psychopathologies of Cognitive Capitalism (Archive Books, 2013). He will be speaking in Warren Sack’s lecture course, and interested parties are invited to attend. Those who would like to participate in a further discussion with Neidich that afternoon should email wsack@ucsc.edu.

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Thursday, Jan 22 / CENTER FOR EMERGING WORLDS / Naveeda Khan / Graduate Student Workshop / 10:00am – 12:00pm / Social Sciences 1, Room 261

Professor Khan will work with selected graduate students to workshop their research. The discussion is open to graduate students and faculty.

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Thursday, Jan 22 / HISTORY OF CONSCIOUSNESS / Lauren Berlant / “Structures of Unfeeling: Mysterious Skin” / 2:00 – 3:30pm / Humanities I, Room 210

This is a talk about flat affect, anachronism, and the history of the present. The concept of a “structure of feeling” offered by Raymond Williams points to atmospheres shared among strangers but circulating beneath the surface of explicit life. How do we access that material? What happens to our capacity for trust and interpretation when the shared affects are manifested in flat or recessive styles of being that occlude expressivity? “Structures of Unfeeling: Mysterious Skin” works with Scott Helm’s novel and Gregg Araki’s film to think about how scenes of “underperformed” or flat emotion shift social norms of trust and aesthetic norms of the event: to do this, it implicates a history of aesthetic movements from twentieth century avant-gardes and theories of traumatic dissociation to the inside knowledges of sexual culture and the DIY aesthetics of punk and mumblecore.

Professor Berlant is George M. Pullman Professor of English and Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago, where she has taught since 1984.

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Thursday, Jan 22 / LIVING WRITERS SERIES / Veronica Reyes & Javier Huerta / 6:00-7:45pm / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

Verónica Reyes is a Chicana feminist jota poet from East Los Angeles, California. She earned her BA from California State University, Long Beach and her MFA from University of Texas, El Paso. She scripts poetry for the people. Her poems give voice to all her communities: Chicanas/os, immigrants, Mexicanas/os, and la jotería. Reyes has won AWP’s Intro-Journal Project, an Astraea Lesbian Foundation Emerging Artist award, and was a Finalist for Andrés Montoya Poetry award. Her work has appeared in Calyx, Feminist Studies, ZYZZYZVA, The New York Quarterly, Ms. Magazine (Online), and The Minnesota Review. She is a proud member of Macondo Writers’ Workshop.
Her first poetry book, Chopper! Chopper! Poetry from Bordered Lives (Arktoi Books, an imprint of Red Hen Press 2013), has won Best Poetry from International Latino Book Awards 2014, Best Poetry from Golden Crown Literary Society Awards 2014, Goldie award, and was a Finalist for Lesbian Poetry from Lambda Literary Awards 2014.

Javier O. Huerta is the author of Some Clarifications y otros poemas (Arte Publico 2007), which received the Chicano/Latino Literary Prize from UC Irvine, and American Copia: An Immigrant Epic (Arte Publico 2012). His poems have recently been anthologized in American Tensions: Literature of Identity and the Search for Social Justice, The Best American Nonrequired Reading 2011, and Everyman’s Library Art and Artists: Poems. He lives in Berkeley, California.

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Friday, Jan 23 / FRIDAY FORUM FOR GRADUATE RESEARCH / Wes Modes / “A Secret History of American River People” / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

Wes Modes is an MFA candidate in Digital Arts and New Media (DAMN). His project, “Secret History,” is a journey to discover, present, and connect the lost narratives of people who live and work on the river from the deck of a recreated shantyboat. With help from numerous people who work and live on the river, Wes Modes is creating a growing digital archive of personal histories — the lost stories of river people, river communities, and the river itself, including the personal chronicle of the artist’s adventure.

The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:00 to 1:30PM and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. Light refreshments will be available.

For more info, or to inquire about joining the roster of presenters for Spring quarter contact: fridayforum.ucsc@gmail.com

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For more on Of Interest events please see the Institute for Humanities Research calendar.

November 15 Philosophy Colloquium- Scott Gilbert: “We are all lichens: How symbiosis research has reconstituted a new realm of individuality”

4:00pm, Humanities 1, Room 210

Co-sponsored by UCSC Philosophy, History of Consciousness, Center for Cultural Studies, and the Science and Justice Working Group.

ABSTRACT: The notion of the “biological individual” is crucial to studies of genetics, immunology, evolution, development, anatomy, and physiology. Each of these biological sub-disciplines has a specific conception of individuality, which has historically provided conceptual contexts for integrating newly acquired data. During the past decade, nucleic acid analysis, especially genomic sequencing and high-throughput RNA techniques, has challenged each of these disciplinary definitions by finding significant interactions of animals and plants with symbiotic microorganisms that disrupt the boundaries which heretofore had characterized the biological individual. Animals cannot be considered individuals by anatomical, or physiological criteria, because a diversity of symbionts are both present and functional in completing metabolic pathways and serving other physiological functions. Similarly, these new studies have shown that animal development is incomplete without symbionts. Symbionts also constitute a second mode of genetic inheritance, providing selectable genetic variation for natural selection. The immune system also develops, in part, in dialogue with symbionts, and thereby functions as a mechanism for integrating microbes into the animal-cell community. Recognizing the “holobiont”—the multicellular eukaryote plus its colonies of persistent symbionts– as a critically important unit of anatomy, development, physiology, immunology, and evolution, opens up new investigative avenues and conceptually challenges the ways in which the biological sub-disciplines have heretofore characterized living entities.

ABOUT: Scott F. Gilbert is the Howard A. Schneiderman Professor of Biology at Swarthmore College, where he teaches developmental genetics, embryology, and the history and critiques of biology. He received his B.A. in both biology and religion from Wesleyan University (1971), and he earned his PhD in biology from the pediatric genetics laboratory of Dr. Barbara Migeon at the Johns Hopkins University (1976). His M.A. in the history of science, also from The Johns Hopkins University, was done under the supervision of Dr. Donna Haraway. He pursued postdoctoral research at the University of Wisconsin in the laboratories of Dr. Masayasu Nomura and Dr. Robert Auerbach. Dr. Gilbert has been Chair of the Division of Developmental and Cell Biology of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology, and he is a member of the education committee of the Society for Developmental Biology.

He has also been elected a fellow of the AAAS and the St. Petersburg Society of Naturalists. He currently has three books in print:Developmental Biology (a textbook in its eighth edition), Bioethics and the New Embryology (a volume, co-authored with two students, that discusses new findings in developmental biology with respect to philosophy and religion), and Ecological Developmental Biology, a textbook co-authored with David Epel which integrates developmental plasticity, epigenetics, and symbiosis into discussions of medicine and evolution. Scott has received several awards, including the Medal of François I from the Collège de France, the Dwight J. Ingle Memorial Writing Award, the Choice Outstanding Academic Book Award,  honorary doctorates from the University of Helsinki and the University of Tartu, and a John Simon Guggenheim Foundation Grant. In 2002, the Society for Developmental Biology awarded him its first Viktor Hamburger Prize for Excellence in Education, and in 2004, he was awarded the Kowalevsky Prize in Evolutionary Developmental Biology. He has recently become a Finland Distinguished Professor at the University of Helsinki and has received a grant from the National Science Foundation to work on that most interesting of topics-how the turtle forms its shell-and he continues to do research and write in both developmental biology and in the history and philosophy of biology.

Outside the class and laboratory, his interests include hiking, photography, and he plays piano in KNISH, one of Swarthmore’s premier Klezmer bands

Grace Lee Boggs

Nov 8 Sustaining Activism and Political Hope: Webinar with Grace Lee Boggs

2:00-4:00pm | Social Sciences 1, Room 261

Anyone who wishes to attend the webinar online instead of in person, please contact Nancy Chen <nchenucsc@gmail.com> as soon as possible to reserve a spot.  We will be using Google + hangouts as the webinar platform so be prepared to have a Google account.  The platform is limited to 10 parties so please rsvp by November 7 for instructions.

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A legendary activist for social justice, Grace Lee Boggs—now 97 years old—has participated in social and political movements against war and on behalf of labor, civil rights, environmental justice, Black Power, Asian Americans, and women. In her writing and through her organizing, Boggs has helped to transform the lived experience of work, community and politics. Someone who perceives a vacant lot to be a space of possibility rather than an occasion for despair, Boggs has been a leader in the nationally recognized movement to construct a new kind of economy “from the ground up” in Detroit and to effect a paradigm shift there in the concept of education.

Participants in the webinar are encouraged to read Grace Lee Boggs’s book, The Next American Revolution: Sustainable Activism for the Twenty-First Century (UC Press, 2011), which includes autobiographical and theoretical chapters, chapters about the economic and educational movements in Detroit, and a conversation between Grace Lee Boggs and Immanuel Wallerstein. Chapter Two of the book—“Revolution as a New Beginning”—is available here or here. Copies of the book are available at the Literary Guillotine.